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Termite Parade

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Termite Parade Cover

ISBN13: 9780982015162
ISBN10: 098201516x
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Awards

Review-A-Day

"Mired (rhymes with tired) is a woman with rather poor taste in men. One former boyfriend drunkenly urinated in her closet. Another, a dreadlocked white boy, drunkenly shaved her head. Anybody notice a trend here? When she finally met somebody who would tolerate her self-destructive behavior, she dumped him because she didn't want to attend his drum circle. She doesn't hold up much better with her current beau, Derek, who, after enduring an embarrassing drunken rant, drops Mired down a flight of stairs in a moment of blind fury." Gerry Donaghy, Powells.com (read the entire Powells.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Termite Parade is the second novel from San Francisco Chronicle best-selling author Joshua Mohr. It is a mature look at the honest side of human interaction.

Derek drops his black-out drunk and verbally abusive girlfriend, Mired, down a flight of stairs in their apartment building on purpose, and then calls his estranged twin brother Frank to help clean up the mess.

Mired thinks she fell and blames herself; Frank knows better; Derek, ravaged with guilt, plays along before ditching town altogether.

Termite Parade examines how Derek, Mired, and Frank cope with the incident, and, more deeply, the concepts of how we love one another; whether individuals are capable of change or whether we simply are who we are; and how capable we are, despite being an extremely intelligent and evolved species, of being savage animals.

Review:

"Told by three narrators, this is the fabulously grim if perhaps too intentionally murky tale of Mired ('pronounced like the verb'); her boyfriend, Derek; and his twin brother, Frank, as they fumble through the aftermath of Mired's strangely fateful drunken tumble down a flight of stairs. 'There were days I felt like the bastard daughter of a mnage trois between Fyodor Dostoyevski, Sylvia Plath, and Eeyore,' Mired says, and this could be said about the rest of the misanthropic trio as they spend the totality of the book trying to uncover truths about themselves and one another. Each has a chance to share parts of the story, and occasionally the brothers chime in together with childhood memories, which allows the story to lift itself, somewhat, from the confusion and disorder shared by the narrators. The prose, meanwhile, is oddly lovely, considering the characters' dark, boozy, mostly joyless worlds. As Derek grows more depressed and Frank has a falling out with his brother's girlfriend, the group moves toward a frenzied climax that calls for a tumbler of whiskey. (July)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Mohr's prose roams with chimerical liquidity." Boston's Weekly Dig

Review:

"[A] wry and unnerving story of bad love gone rotten. [Mohr] has a generous understanding of his characters, whom he describes with an intelligence and sensitivity that pulls you in. This is no small achievement." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Similar to Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment: the most crucial action serves as a portal to and wellspring for the various psychologies of its characters. But Mohr's storytelling is so absorbing that Termite Parade does not read like an analytical rumination; if he is examining the very nature of these characters under a microscope, he at least lets the specimens speak for themselves." San Francisco Chronicle

Synopsis:

A mature second novel from the best-selling author of Some Things That Meant the World to Me.

About the Author

Joshua Mohr is the author of Some Things That Meant the World to Me, which was one of O Magazine's Top 10 reads of 2009, and the newly released Termite Parade, which was an Editor's Choice selection of The New York Times Book Review. He has an MFA from the University of San Francisco and has published numerous short stories and essays in publications such as Other Voices, The Cimarron Review, Pleiades, and Gulf Coast, among others. Joshua is a regular contributor to TheRumpus.net, teaches writing in San Francisco, and sings in the band Damn Handsome and The Birthday Suits. Please visit him at joshuamohr.net.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

jabiz, October 9, 2010 (view all comments by jabiz)
Joshua Mohr’s second novel, Termite Parade, can best be summarized by the scraps of its own prose. The regurgitated chunks of text when spread out on a blank page are all one needs to understand the painful themes he has so tactfully woven into the perfectly paced plot. Ignoring any traces of sophomore novel angst, Mohr unabashedly allows the reader to wallow in the “vibrancy of creation” while he holds up “a mirror to humankind, so the animals could see themselves.”

The idea of humans as animals is the backbone of Mohr’s tale. He forces the reader into the cages of three characters who “reveal every contortion of their flimsy spirits,” in everything they do and say. He unhurriedly creates a tapestry of shame, guilt, and regret. But rather than pity these lost souls who are trapped in their self-inflicted “dilapidated zoo,” and floundering in their “arrogant betrayals,” Mohr forces us to see ourselves in their malice and indignity.

Mohr’s characters and their abusive existences act as a reminder to us all that the human spirit, while masquerading as noble and benevolent is really just, “seconds from crumbling away.”

Early in the novel, Mohr states, “maybe there is no difference between evolution and devolution as long as it leads to change.” He then spends the remainder of the book deconstructing his three characters down to their most base emotions, and he painfully unveils the animal in us all. By allowing us to relate to their self-loathing, Mohr helps us unhurriedly peel back the duplicity we all hide behind to survive. “What’s the difference between lying to yourself and being redeemed?” He asks. Mohr dares us to admit that we don’t all constantly lie to ourselves.

While Termite Parade is a book that forces you to acknowledge the “neglected, hoarse conscience,” within us all, ultimately it is a novel of hope. Mohr may expose the hypocrisy of human happiness, but at the same time he alleges that perhaps when broken down to our most animal instincts we can, help the unveiled animal get “it’s voice back and sing.”

This novel is an honest and tender testimony to what it means to be human in the face of a world trapped in it’s own apathy and tedium. With every sentence carefully crafted, and every word chosen for immediate impact, it is littered with intense visceral scenes. You may be able to read it in one sitting, but this is a novel that will stay with you every time you look in a mirror and lie to yourself.



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Product Details

ISBN:
9780982015162
Author:
Mohr, Joshua
Publisher:
Two Dollar Radio
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Man-woman relationships
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20100731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
7.40x5.40x.80 in. .48 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Small Press » Fiction and Prose
History and Social Science » Archaeology » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General

Termite Parade New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.00 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Two Dollar Radio - English 9780982015162 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Told by three narrators, this is the fabulously grim if perhaps too intentionally murky tale of Mired ('pronounced like the verb'); her boyfriend, Derek; and his twin brother, Frank, as they fumble through the aftermath of Mired's strangely fateful drunken tumble down a flight of stairs. 'There were days I felt like the bastard daughter of a mnage trois between Fyodor Dostoyevski, Sylvia Plath, and Eeyore,' Mired says, and this could be said about the rest of the misanthropic trio as they spend the totality of the book trying to uncover truths about themselves and one another. Each has a chance to share parts of the story, and occasionally the brothers chime in together with childhood memories, which allows the story to lift itself, somewhat, from the confusion and disorder shared by the narrators. The prose, meanwhile, is oddly lovely, considering the characters' dark, boozy, mostly joyless worlds. As Derek grows more depressed and Frank has a falling out with his brother's girlfriend, the group moves toward a frenzied climax that calls for a tumbler of whiskey. (July)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Mired (rhymes with tired) is a woman with rather poor taste in men. One former boyfriend drunkenly urinated in her closet. Another, a dreadlocked white boy, drunkenly shaved her head. Anybody notice a trend here? When she finally met somebody who would tolerate her self-destructive behavior, she dumped him because she didn't want to attend his drum circle. She doesn't hold up much better with her current beau, Derek, who, after enduring an embarrassing drunken rant, drops Mired down a flight of stairs in a moment of blind fury." (read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review" by , "Mohr's prose roams with chimerical liquidity."
"Review" by , "[A] wry and unnerving story of bad love gone rotten. [Mohr] has a generous understanding of his characters, whom he describes with an intelligence and sensitivity that pulls you in. This is no small achievement."
"Review" by , "Similar to Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment: the most crucial action serves as a portal to and wellspring for the various psychologies of its characters. But Mohr's storytelling is so absorbing that Termite Parade does not read like an analytical rumination; if he is examining the very nature of these characters under a microscope, he at least lets the specimens speak for themselves."
"Synopsis" by , A mature second novel from the best-selling author of Some Things That Meant the World to Me.
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