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The Death of Punishment: Searching for Justice Among the Worst of the Worst

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The Death of Punishment: Searching for Justice Among the Worst of the Worst Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For twelve years Robert Blecker, a criminal law professor, wandered freely inside Lorton Central Prison, armed only with cigarettes and a tape recorder. The Death of Punishment tests legal philosophy against the reality and wisdom of street criminals and their guards.  Some killers poignant circumstances should lead us to mercy; others show clearly why they should die. After thousands of hours over twenty-five years inside maximum security prisons and on death rows in seven states, the history and philosophy professor exposes the perversity of justice: Inside prison, ironically, its nobodys job to punish. Thus the worst criminals often live the best lives.

The Death of Punishment challenges the reader to refine deeply held beliefs on life and death as punishment that flare up with every news story of a heinous crime. It argues that society must redesign life and death in prison to make the punishment more nearly fit the crime. It closes with the final irony: If we make prison the punishment it should be, we may well abolish the very death penalty justice now requires.

 

Review:

"Opponents of capital punishment will find this treatise unsettling, if not outright maddening. Blecker, a professor at New York Law School, makes his case for an ethics of retributive punishment — a proportional 'eye for an eye' — but ends up getting bogged down in tangential, and occasionally disingenuous, arguments about the current state of the criminal justice system. Blecker notes discrepancies in treatment between 'the worst of the worst' and others serving life, or even death sentences, demonstrating that life without parole is not always the harsh sentence many assume. But Blecker is dismissive of abolitionists' criticisms, even stating that it's worth the risk of executing the innocent in the pursuit of 'the near certainty of justice.' His proposal for Permanent Punitive Segregation — a sentence that would deprive the worst of the worst any pleasures in order to make their time behind bars oppressive — is one that Connecticut has adopted and that other jurisdictions would do well to consider, he says. Blecker's potentially sympathetic argument about the merits of retributive punishment for mankind's 'monsters' gets lost amid his continual attempts repudiate those who think otherwise. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A passionate and counterintuitive defense of the death penalty that asks us to reconsider punishment as the key to reforming our judicial system

About the Author

Robert Blecker is a professor at New York Law School, a nationally known expert on the death penalty, and the subject of the documentary "Robert Blecker Wants Me Dead."  He formerly prosecuted corruption in New York's criminal justice system as a Special Assistant Attorney General and has been the sole keynote speaker supporting the death penalty at several major national and international conferences.  A post-graduate Harvard fellow in Law and Humanities, Blecker wrote a stage play "Vote NO!"  which premiered at the Kennedy Center.  Profiled by the New York Times and Washington Post, the subject of a USA Today cover story, and recently featured on ABC Nightline,  Blecker frequently comments for national media, including the New York Times, PBS, CNN and BBC World News.  He lives in New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781137278562
Author:
Blecker, Robert
Publisher:
Palgrave MacMillan
Subject:
Law Enforcement
Subject:
Penology
Subject:
Criminal Law - Sentencing
Subject:
Crime-Enforcement and Investigation
Subject:
Crime-Prisons and Prisoners
Publication Date:
20131131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
10 x 7 x 2 in 1 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
History and Social Science » Crime » Enforcement and Investigation
History and Social Science » Crime » Prisons and Prisoners
History and Social Science » Crime » Punishment
History and Social Science » Law » Criminal Law » Sentencing
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Science and Mathematics » Chemistry » General

The Death of Punishment: Searching for Justice Among the Worst of the Worst New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$28.00 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Palgrave MacMillan - English 9781137278562 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Opponents of capital punishment will find this treatise unsettling, if not outright maddening. Blecker, a professor at New York Law School, makes his case for an ethics of retributive punishment — a proportional 'eye for an eye' — but ends up getting bogged down in tangential, and occasionally disingenuous, arguments about the current state of the criminal justice system. Blecker notes discrepancies in treatment between 'the worst of the worst' and others serving life, or even death sentences, demonstrating that life without parole is not always the harsh sentence many assume. But Blecker is dismissive of abolitionists' criticisms, even stating that it's worth the risk of executing the innocent in the pursuit of 'the near certainty of justice.' His proposal for Permanent Punitive Segregation — a sentence that would deprive the worst of the worst any pleasures in order to make their time behind bars oppressive — is one that Connecticut has adopted and that other jurisdictions would do well to consider, he says. Blecker's potentially sympathetic argument about the merits of retributive punishment for mankind's 'monsters' gets lost amid his continual attempts repudiate those who think otherwise. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A passionate and counterintuitive defense of the death penalty that asks us to reconsider punishment as the key to reforming our judicial system
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