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1 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z

Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman

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Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman Cover

ISBN13: 9781400044610
ISBN10: 1400044618
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Staff Pick

Murakami's third short story collection for the West is a varied assortment of sublime confections. His prose voice speaks to me in a way few writers can. The story "The Kidney-Shaped Stone That Moves Every Day" still haunts me.
Recommended by Gerry, Powells.com

There are two kinds of people in this world: those who have never read Haruki Murakami and those who love his books with feverish devotion. Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman is a career-spanning collection of short stories guaranteed to amuse, disturb, beguile, and delight both devotees and novices alike.
Recommended by Gerry, Powells.com

Murakami's third short story collection for the West is a varied assortment of sublime confections. His prose voice speaks to me in a way few writers can. The story "The Kidney-Shaped Stone That Moves Every Day" still haunts me.
Recommended by Gerry, Powells.com

There are two kinds of people in this world: those who have never read Haruki Murakami and those who love his books with feverish devotion. Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman is a career-spanning collection of short stories guaranteed to amuse, disturb, beguile, and delight both devotees and novices alike.
Recommended by Gerry, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

"Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, Murakami's first collection of short stories in more than a decade, again demonstrates his fabulous talent for transporting readers and making 'the world fade away' with a few short strokes of his pen....What shines in all of [these stories] is Murakami's love for the open-ended mystery at the core of existence and his willingness to give himself up 'to the flow' in order to capture some of the magic in the mundane." Heller McAlpin, The Christian Science Monitor (read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Following the best-selling triumph of Kafka on the Shore — "daringly original," wrote Steven Moore in the Washington Post Book World, "and compulsively readable" — comes a collection that generously expresses Murakami's mastery. From the surreal to the mundane, these stories exhibit his ability to transform the full range of human experience in ways that are instructive, surprising, and relentlessly entertaining. As Richard Eder has written in the Los Angeles Times Book Review, "He addresses the fantastic and the natural, each with the same mix of gravity and lightness."

Here are animated crows, a criminal monkey, and an iceman, as well as the dreams that shape us and the things we might wish for. Whether during a chance reunion in Italy, a romantic exile in Greece, a holiday in Hawaii, or in the grip of everyday life, Murakami's characters confront grievous loss, or sexuality, or the glow of a firefly, or the impossible distances between those who ought to be the closest of all.

"While anyone can tell a story that resembles a dream," Laura Miller wrote in the New York Times Book Review, "it's the rare artist, like this one, who can make us feel that we are dreaming it ourselves" — a feat performed anew twenty-four times in this career-spanning book.

Review:

"[Signature] Reviewed by Lily Tuck One of my favorite Haruki Murakami stories is 'The Elephant Vanishes' — part of an earlier collection published in 1991 — in which the narrator watches as an elephant in a zoo grows smaller and smaller until finally the elephant disappears. No explanation is given, there is no resolution, the vanished elephant remains a mystery at the same time that the narrator's life is changed forever. Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, Murakami's new collection of 25 stories, many of which have appeared in the New Yorker and other publications, also describes these epiphanic instances. In the title story, a character who is half deaf, alludes to a John Ford movie, Fort Apache, in which John Wayne tells the newly arrived colonel that if he actually saw some Indians on his way to the fort that means there weren't any. Everything is a bit off — including of course the blind willow trees whose pollen carry flies that burrow inside a sleeping woman's ears — as in a dream, where explanations are always lacking but where interpretations are plentiful. In 'Mirror,' the narrator sees someone who appears to be both himself and not himself in a mirror and then finds out the mirror does not exist; the disaffected woman — a lot of Murakami's characters are handicapped or incapacitated in some physical way — in 'The Shinagawa Monkey,' loses her own name; in 'Man-Eating Cats,' the narrator's girlfriend disappears and as he searches for her finds that 'with each step I took, I felt myself sinking deeper into a quicksand where my identity vanished.' Murakami's stories are difficult to describe and one should, I think, resist attempts to overanalyze them. Their beauty lies in their ephemeral and incantatory qualities and in his uncanny ability to tap into a sort of collective unconscious. In addition, a part of Murakami's genius is that he uses images as plot points, going from image to image, like in the marvelous story 'Airplane,' where, while making love, the narrator imagines strings hanging from the ceiling and how each one might open up a different possibility — good and bad. It is clear that Murakami is well acquainted with the teachings of Buddhism, western philosophies, Jungian theory; he has a deep knowledge of music and, also, I have been told, is a dedicated, strong swimmer. In his stories, he roams freely and convincingly through all these elements (and no doubt many more) without differentiating to create a world where cats talk and elephants disappear. In the introduction to this collection, Murakami writes how, for him, writing a novel is a challenge and how writing short stories is a joy — these stories are a joy for his readers as well. Lily Tuck's most recent novel, The News from Paraguay, won the 2004 National Book Award. " Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Readers who fear the short story...need to set hesitations aside here. Murakami is an open-armed, hospitable short story writer [with] a greatly appealing and embracing personal narrative voice....The beauty of the author's prose style seals every story's sharp delivery." Booklist

Review:

"Murakami's matchless gift for making the unconventional and even the surreal inviting and gratifying creates hard little narrative gems....A superlative display of a great writer's wares. Absolutely essential." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Many of these stories have a good chance of surviving, fusing as they do the great modern magical realist tradition with a compelling insouciance and an emotional spareness many readers will find they share." Chicago Tribune

Review:

"A warning to new readers of Haruki Murakami: You will become addicted....Murakami is a true believer in the unexpected phone call with a ghost on the other end. Read him and you may begin seeing things." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"In Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, the 25 stories juxtapose the deeply bizarre with the mundane to evoke fleeting moods of sadness, hope, nostalgia, and dread. (Grade: B+)" Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"[A] satisfying, entertaining collection from the writer of the brilliant Kafka on the Shore. It is a solid introduction to the eclectic talents of this master storyteller of the absurd." Seattle Times

Review:

"In this extraordinary new story collection...reality is ever in danger of breaking loose of its moorings....Life becomes more problematic after you read a Murakami story, one reason, among many, why he is truly a great writer." Baltimore Sun

Synopsis:

From the bestselling author of Kafka on the Shore and The Wind-up Bird Chronicles comes this superb collection of twenty-four stories that generously expresses Murakamis mastery of the form. From the surreal to the mundane, these stories exhibit his ability to transform the full range of human experience in ways that are instructive, surprising, and relentlessly entertaining.

Here are animated crows, a criminal monkey, and an iceman, as well as the dreams that shape us and the things we might wish for. Whether during a chance reunion in Italy, a romantic exile in Greece, a holiday in Hawaii, or in the grip of everyday life, Murakamis characters confront grievous loss, or sexuality, or the glow of a firefly, or the impossible distances between those who ought to be closest of all.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

Haruki Murakami was born in Kyoto in 1949 and now lives near Tokyo. His work has been translated into thirty-four languages, and the most recent of his many honors is the Yomiuri Literary Prize, whose previous recipients include Yukio Mishima, Kenzaburo Oe, and Kobo Abe.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Table of Contents

Introduction to the English Edition

1) Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman
2) Birthday Girl
3) New York Mining Disaster
4) Airplane: Or, How He Talked to Himself as If Reciting Poetry
5) The Mirror
6) A Folklore for My Generation: A Pre-History of Late-Stage Capitalism
7) Hunting Knife
8) A Perfect Day for Kangaroos
9) Dabchick
10) Man-Eating Cats
11) A "Poor Aunt" Story
12) Nausea 1979
13) The Seventh Man
14) The Year of Spaghetti
15) Tony Takitani
16) The Rise and Fall of Sharpie Cakes
17) The Ice Man
18) Crabs
19) Firefly
20) Chance Traveler
21) Hanalei Bay
22) Where I'm Likely to Find It
23) The Kidney-Shaped Stone That Moves Every Day
24) A Shinagawa Monkey

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

vvvavoom, September 16, 2006 (view all comments by vvvavoom)
finally! it always seems like too long between murakami's new releases which, happily, are always worth the wait. although the titles of the short stories are fantastic on their own, the content behind them is expectedly great murakami prose.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(13 of 23 readers found this comment helpful)
bobbiemcgarey, September 6, 2006 (view all comments by bobbiemcgarey)
A willow tree's branches drape down to the ground forming a natural umbrella to hide those under its branches. One could sleep there unobserved neither seeing the world nor being seen. It sounds as well like a perfect place to sit and read and be quiet with a very chaotic world swirling around.
Evocative title for a book of short stories and I want to know what's behind the 'veil'.




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(10 of 22 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400044610
Author:
Murakami, Haruki
Publisher:
Knopf
Translator:
Gabriel, Philip
Translator:
Rubin, Jay
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Short Stories (single author)
Subject:
Short stories, japanese
Copyright:
Edition Description:
American
Publication Date:
20060829
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.44x6.58x1.13 in. 1.39 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Rare Books » Fiction and Poetry » Literature

Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Alfred A. Knopf - English 9781400044610 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Murakami's third short story collection for the West is a varied assortment of sublime confections. His prose voice speaks to me in a way few writers can. The story "The Kidney-Shaped Stone That Moves Every Day" still haunts me.

"Staff Pick" by ,

There are two kinds of people in this world: those who have never read Haruki Murakami and those who love his books with feverish devotion. Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman is a career-spanning collection of short stories guaranteed to amuse, disturb, beguile, and delight both devotees and novices alike.

"Staff Pick" by ,

Murakami's third short story collection for the West is a varied assortment of sublime confections. His prose voice speaks to me in a way few writers can. The story "The Kidney-Shaped Stone That Moves Every Day" still haunts me.

"Staff Pick" by ,

There are two kinds of people in this world: those who have never read Haruki Murakami and those who love his books with feverish devotion. Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman is a career-spanning collection of short stories guaranteed to amuse, disturb, beguile, and delight both devotees and novices alike.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "[Signature] Reviewed by Lily Tuck One of my favorite Haruki Murakami stories is 'The Elephant Vanishes' — part of an earlier collection published in 1991 — in which the narrator watches as an elephant in a zoo grows smaller and smaller until finally the elephant disappears. No explanation is given, there is no resolution, the vanished elephant remains a mystery at the same time that the narrator's life is changed forever. Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, Murakami's new collection of 25 stories, many of which have appeared in the New Yorker and other publications, also describes these epiphanic instances. In the title story, a character who is half deaf, alludes to a John Ford movie, Fort Apache, in which John Wayne tells the newly arrived colonel that if he actually saw some Indians on his way to the fort that means there weren't any. Everything is a bit off — including of course the blind willow trees whose pollen carry flies that burrow inside a sleeping woman's ears — as in a dream, where explanations are always lacking but where interpretations are plentiful. In 'Mirror,' the narrator sees someone who appears to be both himself and not himself in a mirror and then finds out the mirror does not exist; the disaffected woman — a lot of Murakami's characters are handicapped or incapacitated in some physical way — in 'The Shinagawa Monkey,' loses her own name; in 'Man-Eating Cats,' the narrator's girlfriend disappears and as he searches for her finds that 'with each step I took, I felt myself sinking deeper into a quicksand where my identity vanished.' Murakami's stories are difficult to describe and one should, I think, resist attempts to overanalyze them. Their beauty lies in their ephemeral and incantatory qualities and in his uncanny ability to tap into a sort of collective unconscious. In addition, a part of Murakami's genius is that he uses images as plot points, going from image to image, like in the marvelous story 'Airplane,' where, while making love, the narrator imagines strings hanging from the ceiling and how each one might open up a different possibility — good and bad. It is clear that Murakami is well acquainted with the teachings of Buddhism, western philosophies, Jungian theory; he has a deep knowledge of music and, also, I have been told, is a dedicated, strong swimmer. In his stories, he roams freely and convincingly through all these elements (and no doubt many more) without differentiating to create a world where cats talk and elephants disappear. In the introduction to this collection, Murakami writes how, for him, writing a novel is a challenge and how writing short stories is a joy — these stories are a joy for his readers as well. Lily Tuck's most recent novel, The News from Paraguay, won the 2004 National Book Award. " Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, Murakami's first collection of short stories in more than a decade, again demonstrates his fabulous talent for transporting readers and making 'the world fade away' with a few short strokes of his pen....What shines in all of [these stories] is Murakami's love for the open-ended mystery at the core of existence and his willingness to give himself up 'to the flow' in order to capture some of the magic in the mundane." (read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)
"Review" by , "Readers who fear the short story...need to set hesitations aside here. Murakami is an open-armed, hospitable short story writer [with] a greatly appealing and embracing personal narrative voice....The beauty of the author's prose style seals every story's sharp delivery."
"Review" by , "Murakami's matchless gift for making the unconventional and even the surreal inviting and gratifying creates hard little narrative gems....A superlative display of a great writer's wares. Absolutely essential."
"Review" by , "Many of these stories have a good chance of surviving, fusing as they do the great modern magical realist tradition with a compelling insouciance and an emotional spareness many readers will find they share."
"Review" by , "A warning to new readers of Haruki Murakami: You will become addicted....Murakami is a true believer in the unexpected phone call with a ghost on the other end. Read him and you may begin seeing things."
"Review" by , "In Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, the 25 stories juxtapose the deeply bizarre with the mundane to evoke fleeting moods of sadness, hope, nostalgia, and dread. (Grade: B+)"
"Review" by , "[A] satisfying, entertaining collection from the writer of the brilliant Kafka on the Shore. It is a solid introduction to the eclectic talents of this master storyteller of the absurd."
"Review" by , "In this extraordinary new story collection...reality is ever in danger of breaking loose of its moorings....Life becomes more problematic after you read a Murakami story, one reason, among many, why he is truly a great writer."
"Synopsis" by , From the bestselling author of Kafka on the Shore and The Wind-up Bird Chronicles comes this superb collection of twenty-four stories that generously expresses Murakamis mastery of the form. From the surreal to the mundane, these stories exhibit his ability to transform the full range of human experience in ways that are instructive, surprising, and relentlessly entertaining.

Here are animated crows, a criminal monkey, and an iceman, as well as the dreams that shape us and the things we might wish for. Whether during a chance reunion in Italy, a romantic exile in Greece, a holiday in Hawaii, or in the grip of everyday life, Murakamis characters confront grievous loss, or sexuality, or the glow of a firefly, or the impossible distances between those who ought to be closest of all.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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