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1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

Sins of the Seventh Sister: A Novel Based on a True Story of the Gothic South

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Sins of the Seventh Sister: A Novel Based on a True Story of the Gothic South Cover

ISBN13: 9781400045389
ISBN10: 140004538x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

How many times have you thought, “this has got to be true—no one could make this up?” Well, in 1929, Huston Curtiss was seven years old, living with his beautiful, opinionated mother (whose image is on the cover of this book), and surrounded by their romantic, fiercely independent, and often certifiably insane relatives. Huston has never before written about that time—an era of racism and repression, a time when this country was still relatively young, an age of quirky individualism and almost frontier-style freedom that largely has ceased to exist. Fearful he would not be believed, on one hand, but desirous of the freedom to embellish, on the other, Curtiss chronicles that time in Sins of the Seventh Sister, a book he characterizes as “a novel based on a true story of the gothic South.”

It is his story and the story of the people of Elkins, West Virginia, a small town whose inhabitants included his mother, Billy-Pearl Curtiss, and her many sisters—all stunning blondes. Billy-Pearl would prove to be an irresistibly romantic figure in her sons life. She was the seventh of eleven children, all girls to her fathers consternation. By the time of her arrival, her father felt he had been patient enough and insisted on calling her Billy; he taught her everything he had intended to impart to his firstborn son. She would grow up to be one of the most beautiful women in the county, but also one of the most opinionated and liberal. Her aim was so precise that she was barred from the local turkey shoot because none of the men had a chance against her. When a Klansman accused her of attempted homicide after she shot him through the shoulder to stop him from setting fire to the home of her black neighbors, she told the sheriff, “If I had meant to kill him, hed be dead.” And with that defense, she was exonerated.

Curtiss Farm was large and the house had many rooms, which Billy-Pearl got in the habit of gathering people to fill, especially the downtrodden who had nowhere to go. In May 1929, Billy-Pearl brought home a boy from the local orphanage. Stanley was sixteen, the age at which the orphanage kicked children out, and Billy-Pearl, knowing his sad history, could not allow him to end up on the streets. Stanley had witnessed his father beat his mother to death in a drunken rage and had taken a straight razor and slit his fathers throat while he slept. A country judge had the boy castrated to control his aggressive ways. Not a boy, but not yet a man, Stanley was tall, willowy, and frightened as a colt upon his arrival at Curtiss Farm—not at all the playmate for whom Huston had hoped. But quickly a friendship developed between the two that would last a lifetime—a friendship that would survive murder, suicide, madness, and Stanleys eventual transformation into Stella, a singer who would live her adult life as a glamorous woman.

Sins of the Seventh Sister is brilliantly conceived and masterfully written, as alive with flamboyant characters and wildly uncontained emotions as any book to come out of the South.

Synopsis:

Filled with fascinating characters that leap off the page, this beautifully written memoir of the gothic South is similar to the works of Eudora Welty or Flannery O'Connor in its ability to both transport and entertain and give readers characters they feel they have always known.

Synopsis:

Huston Curtiss's early life in West Virginia reads like fiction, but every word is true. In 1929, when Huston (known to his family as Hughie) was seven years old, his mother took in a boy from the local orphanage. Not just any boy, Stanley was a 16-year-old who had been hauled into jail at the age of 10 for slicing his drunk father's throat with a straight razor after the man beat his mother senseless one time too many. As punishment, the boy was castrated and sent to an orphanage before coming to live with the Curtisses, a family of eccentric and affectionate Southerners.

The relationship that develops between Hughie and Stanley will last a lifetime and span Stanley's metamorphosis into Stella, a world-famous opera star who lived her entire life as a woman, married and became a mother without anyone — save Huston — knowing about her past.

Filled with fascinating characters that leap off the page, this beautifully written memoir of the gothic South is similar to the works of Eudora Welty or Flannery O'Connor in its ability to both transport and entertain and give us characters we feel we have always known.

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

apollo559, February 27, 2009 (view all comments by apollo559)
One of the best books I've read in years. It begins as a reverie of the untold life of Stella, a renowned opera singer, and quickly digresses into a period piece of life in rural West Virginia during the early part of the Great Depression as perceived through the eyes of a 7 year old country boy, Hughie, heir to the evolving Curtis Farm (the grown up Huston Curtis). Then the role of the protagonist shifts to the boy's mother, Billie Pearl, a natural born do-gooder. Don't fret, this is not a romance novel. Lots of sex and mayhem in just the first chapter. Murder and madness shortly ensue. Eventually Stella's story gets told... but so do many others.

Had Frank Capra and Huston Curtis teamed up 50 years ago, they could have collaborated to make perhaps 10 movies out of the episodes of the Curtis and Fancler clans, turning tragedy into comedy into tear wrenching redemption. And it even sounds true.

The running theme, sure to amuse, is the interplay between the constant scheming of the liberal minded Billie-Pearl, the most beautiful woman in the county, fiercely independent and out to save the world one neighbor at a time, and her seven and a half year old son, Hughie, the money motivated little capitalist, the political polar opposite, struggling to understand his mother's generosity during a time of economic uncertainty.

Although written in 2003, the book is much more topical in 2009 as an indicator of how much the country has changed, and how much it hasn't, since 1929.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781400045389
Subtitle:
A Novel Based on a True Story of the Gothic South
Author:
Curtiss, Huston
Author:
Curtiss, Huston
Publisher:
Crown
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
Sagas
Subject:
Southern states
Subject:
Family violence
Subject:
Adult children of dysfunctional families
Subject:
Problem families
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
Family saga
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
55B
Publication Date:
20030401
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.58x6.36x1.22 in. 1.37 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Americana » Southern States

Sins of the Seventh Sister: A Novel Based on a True Story of the Gothic South Used Hardcover
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$4.95 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Harmony - English 9781400045389 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Filled with fascinating characters that leap off the page, this beautifully written memoir of the gothic South is similar to the works of Eudora Welty or Flannery O'Connor in its ability to both transport and entertain and give readers characters they feel they have always known.
"Synopsis" by , Huston Curtiss's early life in West Virginia reads like fiction, but every word is true. In 1929, when Huston (known to his family as Hughie) was seven years old, his mother took in a boy from the local orphanage. Not just any boy, Stanley was a 16-year-old who had been hauled into jail at the age of 10 for slicing his drunk father's throat with a straight razor after the man beat his mother senseless one time too many. As punishment, the boy was castrated and sent to an orphanage before coming to live with the Curtisses, a family of eccentric and affectionate Southerners.

The relationship that develops between Hughie and Stanley will last a lifetime and span Stanley's metamorphosis into Stella, a world-famous opera star who lived her entire life as a woman, married and became a mother without anyone — save Huston — knowing about her past.

Filled with fascinating characters that leap off the page, this beautifully written memoir of the gothic South is similar to the works of Eudora Welty or Flannery O'Connor in its ability to both transport and entertain and give us characters we feel we have always known.

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