The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Politics- Human Rights

More copies of this ISBN

Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy

by

Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy Cover

ISBN13: 9781400062096
ISBN10: 1400062098
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $5.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Most Americans would be shocked to discover that slavery still exists in the United States. Yet most of us buy goods made by people who aren't paid for their labor-people who are trapped financially, and often physically. In Nobodies, award-winning journalist John Bowe exposes the outsourcing, corporate chicanery, immigration fraud, and sleights of hand that allow forced labor to continue in the United States while the rest of us notice nothing but the everyday low price at the checkout counter.

Based on thorough and often dangerous research, exclusive interviews, and eyewitness accounts, Nobodies takes you inside three illegal workplaces where employees are virtually or literally enslaved.

In the fields of Immokalee, Florida, underpaid (and often unpaid) illegal immigrants pick the produce all of us consume, connected by a chain of subcontractors and divisions to such companies as PepsiCo and Tropicana. At the top of the chain are stockholders and politicians; at the bottom is a father of six, one of whose children suffers from leukemia, who entered America only to become the unpaid employee of a labor contractor nicknamed El Diablo for his cruelty.

In Tulsa, Oklahoma, the John Pickle Company reaped profits for years making pressure tanks used by oil refineries and power plants. Feeling squeezed by foreign competition and government regulations, JPC partnered with an Indian and Kuwaiti firm to import workers from India. Under the guise of a training program, fifty-three workers, including college-educated Uday Ludbe, came to the United States, only to have their documents confiscated and to find themselves confined to a factory building. Pickle laid off Americans andpaid the Indians three dollars an hour.

Saipan, a U.S. commonwealth in the Western Pacific where the author lived for three years, has long been exempted from American immigration controls, tariffs, and federal income tax-a status quo assiduously protected by lobbyist Jack Abramoff and Congressman Tom DeLay. There, garment magnates-selling to clothing giants like the Gap and Target — live in luxury while thousands of foreign factory workers, 90 percent of them female, work sixty-hour weeks for $3.05 an hour and spend weekends trying to trade sex for green cards. The garments they make are allowed to be labeled MADE IN AMERICA.

Nobodies is a vivid and powerful work of investigative reporting, but it is also a lively examination of the eternal struggle for power between free people and unfree people. Against the American landscape of shopping mall, outlet stores, and Happy Meals, Bowe reveals how humankind's darker urges remain alive and well, lingering in the background of every transaction and how understanding them may lead to overcoming them.

Review:

"In this eye-opening look at the contemporary American scourge of labor abuse and outright slavery, journalist and author Bowe (Gig: Americans Talk About their Jobs) visits locations in Florida, Oklahoma and the U.S.-owned Pacific island of Saipan, where slavery cases have been brought to light as recently as 2006. There, he talks to affected workers, providing many moving and appalling first-hand accounts. In Immokalee, Florida, migrant Latino tomato and orange pickers are barely paid, kept in decrepit conditions and intimidated, violently, to keep quiet about it. A welding factory in Tulsa, Oklahoma imported workers from India who were forced to pay exorbitant 'recruiting fees' and live in squalid barracks with tightly controlled access to the outside world. Considering the tiny island capital of Saipan, Bowe explores how its culture, isolation and American ties made it so favorable an environment for exploitative garment manufacturers and corrupt politicos; alongside the factories sprouted karaoke bars, strip joints and hotels where politicians were entertained by now-imprisoned lobbyist Jack Abramoff. The detailed chapter gives readers a lasting image of the island, touted a 'miracle of economic development,' as a vulnerable, truly suffering community, where poverty rates have climbed as high as 35 percent. Bowe's deeply researched, well-written treatise on the very real problem of modern American slavery deserves the attention of anyone living, working and consuming in America." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"[A] scathing look at the desire for creature comforts and the American notion of freedom." Booklist

About the Author

John Bowe has contributed to The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, GQ, The American Prospect, National Public Radio's "This American Life," McSweeney's, and others. He is the co-editor of Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs, one of Harvard Business Review's best books of 2000, and co-screenwriter of the film Basquiat. In 2004, he received the J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award, the Sydney Hillman Award for journalists, writers, and public figures who pursue social justice and public policy for the common good, and the Richard J. Margolis Award, dedicated to journalism that combines social concern and humor. He lives in Manhattan.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Symbiont, November 20, 2007 (view all comments by Symbiont)
The presentation of this item stokes my interest sufficiently enough that as soon as I can I will buy it. From the provocative title, to the pithy summary I'm hooked on finding out as much as I can on this very, pressing subject. It is about time someone showed us with stark unflincing clarity what is at the end of our forks- the horrors in our Happy Meals. This revelation just might stop us from cramming our faces for a minute to take notice at the amount of suffering that goes into making our cheaply gained, obesity producing fast food!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 11 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400062096
Subtitle:
Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy
Author:
Bowe, John
Publisher:
Random House
Subject:
General
Subject:
Labor
Subject:
Equality
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Globalization - Social aspects
Subject:
Equality -- United States.
Subject:
General Social Science
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20070918
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9.30x6.44x1.25 in. 1.21 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Slaves To Fashion Used Trade Paper $13.50
  2. Ending Slavery: How We Free Today's... Used Hardcover $9.50
  3. Not for Sale: The Return of the...
    Used Trade Paper $6.95
  4. Conversations with God: Two... New Trade Paper $15.99
  5. A History of God: The 4000-Year... Used Trade Paper $2.50
  6. The Sound of Silence: The Selected... New Trade Paper $18.95

Related Subjects

Business » Human Resource Management
Business » Management
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights

Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Random House - English 9781400062096 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this eye-opening look at the contemporary American scourge of labor abuse and outright slavery, journalist and author Bowe (Gig: Americans Talk About their Jobs) visits locations in Florida, Oklahoma and the U.S.-owned Pacific island of Saipan, where slavery cases have been brought to light as recently as 2006. There, he talks to affected workers, providing many moving and appalling first-hand accounts. In Immokalee, Florida, migrant Latino tomato and orange pickers are barely paid, kept in decrepit conditions and intimidated, violently, to keep quiet about it. A welding factory in Tulsa, Oklahoma imported workers from India who were forced to pay exorbitant 'recruiting fees' and live in squalid barracks with tightly controlled access to the outside world. Considering the tiny island capital of Saipan, Bowe explores how its culture, isolation and American ties made it so favorable an environment for exploitative garment manufacturers and corrupt politicos; alongside the factories sprouted karaoke bars, strip joints and hotels where politicians were entertained by now-imprisoned lobbyist Jack Abramoff. The detailed chapter gives readers a lasting image of the island, touted a 'miracle of economic development,' as a vulnerable, truly suffering community, where poverty rates have climbed as high as 35 percent. Bowe's deeply researched, well-written treatise on the very real problem of modern American slavery deserves the attention of anyone living, working and consuming in America." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[A] scathing look at the desire for creature comforts and the American notion of freedom."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.