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25 Remote Warehouse Russia- General Russian History

This title in other editions

The French Revolution in Russian Intellectual Life: 1865-1906

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The French Revolution in Russian Intellectual Life: 1865-1906 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Sandwiched between the East and West, Russian intellectuals have for centuries been divided geographically, politically, and culturally into two distinct groups: the Slavophiles, who rejected Western-style democracy, preferring a more holistic and abstract vision, and the more rational and scientific-minded Westerniers. These two ideologies cut across the political spectrum of late nineteenth-century Russia and competed for dominance in the countrys intellectual life. The tension created between these two opposing groups caused the feeling that violent upheaval was Russias future. In turn, many began to think that Russia was possibly following the path of France and that a French-style revolution might be possible on Russian soil. In The French Revolution in Russian Intellectual Life, Dmitry Shlapentokh describes the role that the French democratic revolution played in Russias intellectual development by the end of the nineteenth century. The revolutionary upheaval in Russia at the beginning of twentieth century and the continuous expansion of the West convinced most Russian intellectuals that the French Revolution in its democratic reading was indeed the pathway of history. Yet the rise of totalitarian regimes and their expansion proved the validity of the sober vision of nineteenth-century Russian intellectuals. Some conservative Russian intellectuals believed that not only would Russia preserve its authoritarian regime but it would spread this regime all over the world. In this context, Shlapentokh argues the French Revolution with its democratic tradition was only a phenomenon of Western civiliation and hence transitory. The flirtation with Western ideology, with its democratic polity and market economy that followed in the wake of the collapse of the communist regime, culminated in an increasing push for corporate authoritarianism and nationalism. This work helps explain why Russia turned away from democratic to autocratic styles-economic pulls to capitalism notwithstanding. It has insight which helps to explain why Russia moved towards an authoritarian regime instead of democracy. Dmitry Shlapentokh is associate professor of history at the University of Indiana, South Bend. Among his books are The French Revolution and the Russian Anti-Democratic Tradition, The Proto-Totalitarian State, Soviet Cinematography, 1918-1991 (with Vladimir Shlapentokh), and East Against West, The First Encounter: The Life of Themistocles.

Book News Annotation:

This is a reprint of the original edition of 1996 by Praeger Publishers with a new introduction by the author. For historians and others who wonder why Russia turned away from a democratic polity and a market economy when it had the chance, Shlapentokh (history, U. of Indiana, South Bend) describes the late nineteenth-century intellectual divide in Russia between those who followed scientific Western ideology and the Slavophiles, who preferred their politics to be more holistic and abstract. The result, he maintains, was tension that caused the impression that a violent upheaval was in Russia's future as it had been in France's past. Shlapentokh traces the influence of the myths of the French Revolution on conservative Slavophiles, liberal capitalists and even on radicals who supported the idea of the Terror. The result is a thorough assessment of how a largely isolated intelligentsia can construct its own interpretations into a totalitarian system ready for application. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The interest of Russian intellectuals in the French Revolution demonstrates that some Russian thinkers of the 19th century had begun to question the concept of Russia's uniqueness. Yet most of them came to believe that the French Revolution (which they tended to equate with the Western experience) was irrelevant not only to Russia but to the rest of the world as well. They saw, perhaps correctly, that the Western experience, with the French Revolution as its symbol, was foreign to Russian destiny. Most of the Russian intellectuals of that time had rightly foreseen Russia, and to some degree the rest of the world's future, as following an authoritarian/totalitarian model of development.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781412807807
Author:
Shlapentokh, Dmitry
Publisher:
Transaction Publishers
Subject:
Europe - Russia & the Former Soviet Union
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - General
Subject:
Philosophy
Subject:
History
Subject:
France History Revolution, 1789-1799.
Subject:
Russia Intellectual life 1801-1917.
Subject:
Russia-General Russian History
Publication Date:
20080731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
202
Dimensions:
8.80x5.80x.60 in. .75 lbs.

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Russia » General Russian History
History and Social Science » Russia » Tsarist Russia
History and Social Science » World History » General

The French Revolution in Russian Intellectual Life: 1865-1906 New Trade Paper
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Product details 202 pages Transaction Publishers - English 9781412807807 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The interest of Russian intellectuals in the French Revolution demonstrates that some Russian thinkers of the 19th century had begun to question the concept of Russia's uniqueness. Yet most of them came to believe that the French Revolution (which they tended to equate with the Western experience) was irrelevant not only to Russia but to the rest of the world as well. They saw, perhaps correctly, that the Western experience, with the French Revolution as its symbol, was foreign to Russian destiny. Most of the Russian intellectuals of that time had rightly foreseen Russia, and to some degree the rest of the world's future, as following an authoritarian/totalitarian model of development.
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