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This title in other editions

Rome 1960: The Summer Olympics That Stirred the World

by

Rome 1960: The Summer Olympics That Stirred the World Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the critically acclaimed and bestselling author David Maraniss, a groundbreaking book that weaves sports, politics, and history into a tour de force about the 1960 Rome Olympics, eighteen days of theater, suspense, victory, and defeat

David Maraniss draws compelling portraits of the athletes competing in Rome, including some of the most honored in Olympic history: decathlete Rafer Johnson, sprinter Wilma Rudolph, Ethiopian marathoner Abebe Bikila, and Louisville boxer Cassius Clay, who at eighteen seized the world stage for the first time, four years before he became Muhammad Ali.

Along with these unforgettable characters and dramatic contests, there was a deeper meaning to those late-summer days at the dawn of the sixties. Change was apparent everywhere. The world as we know it was coming into view.

Rome saw the first doping scandal, the first commercially televised Summer Games, the first athlete paid for wearing a certain brand of shoes. Old-boy notions of Olympic amateurism were crumbling and could never be taken seriously again. In the heat of the cold war, the city teemed with spies and rumors of defections. Every move was judged for its propaganda value. East and West Germans competed as a unified team less than a year before the Berlin Wall.There was dispute over the two Chinas. An independence movement was sweeping sub-Saharan Africa, with fourteen nations in the process of being born. There was increasing pressure to provide equal rights for blacks and women as they emerged from generations of discrimination.

Using the meticulous research and sweeping narrative style that have become his trademark, Maraniss reveals the rich palate of character, competition, and meaning that gave Rome 1960 its singular essence.

Review:

"Overshadowed by more flamboyant or tragic Olympics, the 1960 Rome games were a sociopolitical watershed, argues journalist Maraniss (Clemente) in this colorful retrospective. The games showcased Cold War propaganda ploys as the Soviet Union surged past the U.S. in the medal tally. Steroids and amphetamines started seeping into Olympian bloodstreams. The code of genteel amateurism — one weight-lifter was forbidden to accept free cuts from a meat company — began crumbling in the face of lavish Communist athletic subsidies and under-the-table shoe endorsement deals. And civil rights and anticolonialism became conspicuous themes as charismatic black athletes — supercharged sprinter Wilma Rudolph, brash boxing phenom Cassius Clay, barefoot Ethiopian marathoner Abebe Bikila — grabbed the limelight while the IOC sidestepped the apartheid issue. Still, we're talking about the Olympics, and Maraniss can't help wallowing in the classic tropes: personal rivalries, judging squabbles, come-from-behind victories and inspirational backstories of obstacles overcome (Rudolph wins the gold, having hurdled Jim Crow and childhood polio that left her in leg braces). As usual, these Olympic stories don't quite bear up under the mythic symbolism they're weighted with (with the exception perhaps of Abebe Bikila), but Maraniss provides an intelligent context for his evocative reportage." Publishers Weekly (Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc.)

Review:

"[T]he author's wealth of sociohistorical knowledge that he also bestows upon the reader makes the book essential...Highly recommended." Library Journal

Review:

"Evocative, entertaining and often suspenseful — sports history at a very high standard." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Maraniss does a splendid job of resurrecting these heroes from almost a half-century ago, and of reminding us why we like the Olympics." Washington Post

Synopsis:

From bestselling author Maraniss comes a groundbreaking book that weaves sports, politics, and history into a tour de force about the 1960 Rome Olympics.

Synopsis:

Now in paperback, from the New York Times bestselling author of Clemente and When Pride Still Mattered, here is the blockbuster story of the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, seventeen days that helped define the modern world. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Legendary athletes and stirring events are interwoven into a suspenseful narrative of sports and politics at the Rome games, where cold-war propaganda and spies, drugs and sex, money and television, civil rights and the rise of women superstars all converged to forever change the essence of the Olympics. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Using the meticulous research and sweeping narrative style that have become his trademark, maraniss reveals the rich palette of character, competition, and meaning that gave rome 1960 its singular essence.

About the Author

David Maraniss is an associate editor at The Washington Post. He is the winner of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting and has been a Pulitzer finalist two other times for his journalism and again for They Marched Into Sunlight, a book about Vietnam and the sixties. The author also of bestselling works on Bill Clinton, Vince Lombardi, and Roberto Clemente, Maraniss is a fellow of the Society of American Historians. He and his wife, Linda, live in Washington, DC, and Madison, Wisconsin.

Table of Contents

A Brief Preface

1 All the Way to Moscow
2 All Roads to Rome
3 No Monarch Ever Held Sway
4 May the Best Man Win
5 Out of the Shadows
6 Heat
7 Quicker Than the Eye
8 Upside Down
9 Track and Field News
10 Black Thursday
Interlude: Descending with Gratitude
11 The Wind at Her Back
12 Liberation
13 The Russians Are Coming
14 The Greatest
15 The Last Laps
16 New Worlds
17 The Soft Life
18 "Successful Completion of the Job"
19 A Thousand Sentinels
20 "The World Is Stirring"

Appendix
Acknowledgments
Bibliography
Sources
Notes
Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781416534082
Author:
Maraniss, David
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Subject:
Olympics
Subject:
Cold war
Subject:
History
Subject:
World - General
Subject:
World
Subject:
Olympics -- Political aspects.
Subject:
Sports and Fitness-Olympics
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20090731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1-8 +1-16 b-w insert (24pp); 5 maps t-o;
Pages:
496
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

Related Subjects


Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » General
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Olympics
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sports General

Rome 1960: The Summer Olympics That Stirred the World Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 496 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781416534082 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Overshadowed by more flamboyant or tragic Olympics, the 1960 Rome games were a sociopolitical watershed, argues journalist Maraniss (Clemente) in this colorful retrospective. The games showcased Cold War propaganda ploys as the Soviet Union surged past the U.S. in the medal tally. Steroids and amphetamines started seeping into Olympian bloodstreams. The code of genteel amateurism — one weight-lifter was forbidden to accept free cuts from a meat company — began crumbling in the face of lavish Communist athletic subsidies and under-the-table shoe endorsement deals. And civil rights and anticolonialism became conspicuous themes as charismatic black athletes — supercharged sprinter Wilma Rudolph, brash boxing phenom Cassius Clay, barefoot Ethiopian marathoner Abebe Bikila — grabbed the limelight while the IOC sidestepped the apartheid issue. Still, we're talking about the Olympics, and Maraniss can't help wallowing in the classic tropes: personal rivalries, judging squabbles, come-from-behind victories and inspirational backstories of obstacles overcome (Rudolph wins the gold, having hurdled Jim Crow and childhood polio that left her in leg braces). As usual, these Olympic stories don't quite bear up under the mythic symbolism they're weighted with (with the exception perhaps of Abebe Bikila), but Maraniss provides an intelligent context for his evocative reportage." Publishers Weekly (Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc.)
"Review" by , "[T]he author's wealth of sociohistorical knowledge that he also bestows upon the reader makes the book essential...Highly recommended."
"Review" by , "Evocative, entertaining and often suspenseful — sports history at a very high standard."
"Review" by , "Maraniss does a splendid job of resurrecting these heroes from almost a half-century ago, and of reminding us why we like the Olympics."
"Synopsis" by , From bestselling author Maraniss comes a groundbreaking book that weaves sports, politics, and history into a tour de force about the 1960 Rome Olympics.
"Synopsis" by , Now in paperback, from the New York Times bestselling author of Clemente and When Pride Still Mattered, here is the blockbuster story of the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, seventeen days that helped define the modern world. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Legendary athletes and stirring events are interwoven into a suspenseful narrative of sports and politics at the Rome games, where cold-war propaganda and spies, drugs and sex, money and television, civil rights and the rise of women superstars all converged to forever change the essence of the Olympics. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Using the meticulous research and sweeping narrative style that have become his trademark, maraniss reveals the rich palette of character, competition, and meaning that gave rome 1960 its singular essence.
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