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Einstein's Jewish Science: Physics at the Intersection of Politics and Religion

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Einstein's Jewish Science: Physics at the Intersection of Politics and Religion Cover

ISBN13: 9781421405544
ISBN10: 1421405547
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Is relativity Jewish? The Nazis denigrated Albert Einstein's revolutionary theory by calling it Jewish science, a charge typical of the ideological excesses of Hitler and his followers. Philosopher of science Steven Gimbel explores the many meanings of this provocative phrase and considers whether there is any sense in which Einstein's theory of relativity is Jewish.

Arguing that we must take seriously the possibility that the Nazis were in some sense correct, Gimbel examines Einstein and his work to explore how beliefs, background, and environment may--or may not--influence the work of the scientist. You cannot understand Einstein's science, Gimbel declares, without knowing the history, religion, and philosophy that influenced it.

No one, especially Einstein himself, denies Einstein's Jewish heritage, but many are uncomfortable saying that he was a Jew while he was at his desk working. To understand what Jewish means for Einstein's work, Gimbel first explores the many definitions of Jewish and asks whether there are elements of Talmudic thinking apparent in Einstein's theory of relativity. He applies this line of inquiry to other scientists, including Isaac Newton, Ren? Descartes, Sigmund Freud, and ?mile Durkheim, to consider whether and how their specific religious beliefs or backgrounds manifested in their scientific endeavors.

Einstein's Jewish Science intertwines science, history, philosophy, theology, and politics in fresh and fascinating ways to solve the multifaceted riddle of what religion means--and what it means to science. There are some senses, Gimbel claims, in which Jews can find a special connection to E = mc2, and this claim leads to the engaging, spirited debate at the heart of this book.

Review:

"Prior to WWII, Nazi sympathizers dismissed Einstein's theory of relativity as 'Jewish science.' Yet Einstein himself, notes Gimbel, recognized an intellectual style that could be identified as Jewish. In this wide-ranging exploration, Gimbel (Exploring the Scientific Method), chair of the department of philosophy at Gettysburg College, seeks to discover whether and to what extent Einstein's work could legitimately be called 'Jewish' and what difference it makes. He speculates about whether only a Jew could have discovered relativity theory, or whether the style of reasoning characteristic of Jewish theology can influence scientific thinking (as Catholicism informed the reasoning of Descartes). Finally, Gimbel asks, did Einstein's theory contribute to wider conversations about Jewish themes among contemporary scholars such as Walter Benjamin and Martin Buber? Gimbel felicitously concludes that what makes the theory of relativity so attractive is its cosmopolitanism and intellectual open-mindedness. It is thus only metaphorically Jewish: as the ancient rabbis assumed the existence of God's truth but could approach it only through their contrasting interpretations, so Einstein assumed that science was the pursuit of truth about the world that still allows us the integration of different perspectives on, and individual beliefs about, the world. Agent: Deirdre Mullane, Mullane Literary Associates." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A revealing new portrait of Albert Einstein, the worldandrsquo;s first scientific andldquo;superstarandrdquo;

Synopsis:

The commonly accepted caricature of Albert Einstein is of an eccentric genius for whom the pursuit of science was everything. But in actuality, the brilliant innovator whose Theory of Relativity forever reshaped our understanding of time was a man of his times, always politically engaged and driven by strong moral principles. An avowed pacifist, Einsteinandrsquo;s mistrust of authority and outspoken social and scientific views earned him death threats from Nazi sympathizers in the years preceding World War II. To him, science provided not only a means for understanding the behavior of the universe, but a foundation for considering the deeper questions of life and a way for the worldwide Jewish community to gain confidence and pride in itself.

and#160;

Steven Gimbelandrsquo;s biography presents Einstein in the context of the world he lived in, offering a fascinating portrait of a remarkable individual who remained actively engaged in international affairs throughout his life. This revealing work not only explains Einsteinandrsquo;s theories in understandable terms, it demonstrates how they directly emerged from the realities of his times and helped create the world we live in today.

About the Author

Steven Gimbel is the Edwin T. and Cynthia Shearer Johnson Chair for Distinguished Teaching in the Humanities as well as chair of the philosophy department at Gettysburg College. He lives in Mount Airy, MD.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

David Steinberg, September 7, 2013 (view all comments by David Steinberg)
In 1905 Einstein was speaking to some Jewish Rabies, where he said that He discovered the theory of relativity by doing Rabbinical exercises on the word for light in the original language, in Genesis 1 where God put the two lights in the sky. Light being the fundamental constant. The only thing that never changes.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781421405544
Author:
Gimbel, Steven
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Subject:
Physics-General
Subject:
Science & Technology
Edition Description:
Cloth
Series:
Jewish Lives
Publication Date:
20120431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 b/w illus.
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.75 in

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Sociology » Jewish Studies
Reference » Science Reference » General
Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science
Religion » Judaism » History
Religion » Judaism » Jewish History
Religion » World Religions » Religion and Science
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » History
Science and Mathematics » Physics » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » General History and Philosophy
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Relativity Theory

Einstein's Jewish Science: Physics at the Intersection of Politics and Religion New Hardcover
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$24.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Johns Hopkins University Press - English 9781421405544 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Prior to WWII, Nazi sympathizers dismissed Einstein's theory of relativity as 'Jewish science.' Yet Einstein himself, notes Gimbel, recognized an intellectual style that could be identified as Jewish. In this wide-ranging exploration, Gimbel (Exploring the Scientific Method), chair of the department of philosophy at Gettysburg College, seeks to discover whether and to what extent Einstein's work could legitimately be called 'Jewish' and what difference it makes. He speculates about whether only a Jew could have discovered relativity theory, or whether the style of reasoning characteristic of Jewish theology can influence scientific thinking (as Catholicism informed the reasoning of Descartes). Finally, Gimbel asks, did Einstein's theory contribute to wider conversations about Jewish themes among contemporary scholars such as Walter Benjamin and Martin Buber? Gimbel felicitously concludes that what makes the theory of relativity so attractive is its cosmopolitanism and intellectual open-mindedness. It is thus only metaphorically Jewish: as the ancient rabbis assumed the existence of God's truth but could approach it only through their contrasting interpretations, so Einstein assumed that science was the pursuit of truth about the world that still allows us the integration of different perspectives on, and individual beliefs about, the world. Agent: Deirdre Mullane, Mullane Literary Associates." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
A revealing new portrait of Albert Einstein, the worldandrsquo;s first scientific andldquo;superstarandrdquo;

"Synopsis" by ,
The commonly accepted caricature of Albert Einstein is of an eccentric genius for whom the pursuit of science was everything. But in actuality, the brilliant innovator whose Theory of Relativity forever reshaped our understanding of time was a man of his times, always politically engaged and driven by strong moral principles. An avowed pacifist, Einsteinandrsquo;s mistrust of authority and outspoken social and scientific views earned him death threats from Nazi sympathizers in the years preceding World War II. To him, science provided not only a means for understanding the behavior of the universe, but a foundation for considering the deeper questions of life and a way for the worldwide Jewish community to gain confidence and pride in itself.

and#160;

Steven Gimbelandrsquo;s biography presents Einstein in the context of the world he lived in, offering a fascinating portrait of a remarkable individual who remained actively engaged in international affairs throughout his life. This revealing work not only explains Einsteinandrsquo;s theories in understandable terms, it demonstrates how they directly emerged from the realities of his times and helped create the world we live in today.

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