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1 Beaverton Children's Young Adult- General

This title in other editions

Putting Makeup on Dead People

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Putting Makeup on Dead People Cover

ISBN13: 9781423134817
ISBN10: 1423134818
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the spring of her senior year, Donna Parisi finds new life in an unexpected place: a coffin.

Since her father's death four years ago, Donna has gone through the motions of living: her friendships are empty, she's clueless about what to do after high school graduation, and her grief keeps her isolated, cut off even from the one parent she has left. That is until she's standing in front of the dead body of a classmate at Brighton Brothers' Funeral Home. At that moment, Donna realizes what might just give her life purpose is comforting others in death. That maybe what she really wants to be is a mortician.

This discovery sets in motion a life Donna never imagined was possible. She befriends a charismatic new student, Liz, notices a boy, Charlie, and realizes that maybe he's been noticing her, too, and finds herself trying things she hadn't dreamed of trying before. By taking risks, Donna comes into her own, diving into her mortuary studies with a passion and skill she didn't know she had in her. And she finally understands that moving forward doesn't mean forgetting someone you love.

Jen Violi's heartfelt and funny debut novel is a story of transformation — how one girl learns to grieve and say goodbye, turn loss into a gift, and let herself be exceptional... at loving, applying lipstick to corpses, and finding life in the wake of death.

Review:

"Since Donna's father died, she prefers to go inside herself to a 'quiet place.... the only spot I feel at home,' until she finds another comfortable place — a funeral home — and decides to become a mortician. But even as Donna applies to mortuary school after high school and starts work at Brighton Brothers Funeral Home, she must learn to connect with the living, including her well-meaning but disapproving mother and an offbeat friend who may be crushing on her. Readers will find Donna's job choice intriguing, as well as the descriptions of her education, including restorative arts class, where 'people in lab coats are working with what I think is clay, shaping it into things I have to squint to realize are parts of the human face.' Violi's first novel is swimming in unusual characters, from the people — both living and dead — who pass through the funeral home, to the eccentric members of Donna's church drama troupe. These characters and their many plot lines distract from Donna's journey to embrace both those around her and those who have died. Ages 14 - up. (May)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Although some wry comedy seeps into the narrative, Donna's focus, and the book's, remains on respecting the dead people and easing the grief of their families. As Donna learns how to care for dead people she also begins to care for living ones." Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA, Jen Violi has since made her home in such places as Dayton, OH, Goodyear, AZ, New Orleans, LA, and Takoma Park, MD. Jen has currently staked her claim in Portland, Oregon, where the greenery is plentiful, the creative spirit palpable, and the fresh coffee available every few feet — just how she likes it. At the University of Dayton, Jen completed both a BA in English and Theatre and an MA in Theological Studies and worked for seven years in campus ministry, ultimately as Director of Retreats and Faith Development. During her time at UD, she wrote and directed over fourteen spiritual dramas and facilitated numerous retreat experiences on campus and elsewhere.

In 2004, she journeyed to the University of New Orleans, where she gained an MFA in Creative Writing, an appetite for spicy food, and a love for Earth religions. Via Portland, Jen continues to serve as adjunct faculty for the Applied Healing Arts master's degree program at Tai Sophia Institute in Laurel, MD. Currently, she's also launching her own business, offering services such as creative writing coaching; workshop, retreat, and ritual facilitating; and officiating wedding ceremonies. Jen's fiction has been published in The Baltimore Review, and she's hard at work on her second novel. Through her being and doing, she seeks to honor the sacred in all of its forms and the profound healing power of stories.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 6 comments:

abundantsunshine, July 6, 2011 (view all comments by abundantsunshine)
I loved this book! To put it simply, I just couldn't put it down...and when I did, I kept coming back. Jen Violi's novel was funny and fresh and really spoke to what's relevant in a teenage girl's life: grieving a lost parent definitely, and also the desire to have a real friendship, learning about yourself as a sexual being, the struggle inherent in a relationship with your mom, and figuring out what the hell you want to do with your life. Her characters were warm and real and made the book an absolute delight. Read it...and recommend it to the young adults you know.
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(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
Valerie Mallinson, July 6, 2011 (view all comments by Valerie Mallinson)
s someone who is many years past YA, I have to start by saying that the last YA title I read was probably Harry Potter, but I have a girlfriend who used to be a mortician, and she lead me to get this book. I enjoyed it thoroughly. The lead character is dealing with the grief of losing her father. I lost my father six short years ago, and I found this book to be a gentle reminder of him. The emotions Jen gives to Donna Parisi ring true and genuine, and I think this book could help someone learning to navigate their way through loss. The lingering emotions I have about this book are that it is funny, honest, and overall, Jen Violi treats her characters with love and tenderness. It's refreshing. I also enjoyed being on the other side as an observer of Donna's struggle to separate from her Mom and grow into her own. Putting Makeup on Dead People should be required reading for parents who are trying to dictate what or who their teenagers should be when they grow up, or even anyone who is trying to gracefully learn how to let their young adults go out into the world on their own terms. Don't you ever wonder what you would do if you had do-overs? If you could have the fearlessness of youth and the wisdom of age combined, what would you do differently? This book gave me an opportunity to ponder those possibilities. For that reason, and to continue to help me heal in the journey of letting go of my own father, it was well worth the read.
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(4 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
Gloria Harrison, May 3, 2011 (view all comments by Gloria Harrison)
Putting Makeup on Dead People is not a complicated book, insomuch as the language isn't overwrought, the characters aren't inaccessibly heavy, and the plotting and pacing aren't stylistically challenging. However, the book delicately and playfully plunges the very complicated depths of death, family, faith, and growing up. Donna Parisi, the book's main character, is a girl many young woman can relate to, even those who haven't lost a parent or who haven't decided to rebel by attending mortuary college. On the brink of her high school graduation, Donna struggles with questions many of us faced, or will face, about the future and what kind of person we want to ultimately become - especially in the face of what our loved ones hope for us. Written with heart and great humor (there are so many hilarious moments in this book), Putting Makeup on Dead People takes the reader on a slow walk through the twilight days of high school, and into the dawn of adulthood. It's an absolute pleasure to read - for people of all ages.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781423134817
Author:
Violi, Jen
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Subject:
Situations / Death & Dying
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Death and Dying
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20120731
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 9 up to 17
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 22.8 oz
Age Level:
from 14 up to 99

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Related Subjects


Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Adolescence
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Death and Dying
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Emotions and Feelings
Young Adult » General

Putting Makeup on Dead People Used Hardcover
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$5.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Hyperion - English 9781423134817 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Since Donna's father died, she prefers to go inside herself to a 'quiet place.... the only spot I feel at home,' until she finds another comfortable place — a funeral home — and decides to become a mortician. But even as Donna applies to mortuary school after high school and starts work at Brighton Brothers Funeral Home, she must learn to connect with the living, including her well-meaning but disapproving mother and an offbeat friend who may be crushing on her. Readers will find Donna's job choice intriguing, as well as the descriptions of her education, including restorative arts class, where 'people in lab coats are working with what I think is clay, shaping it into things I have to squint to realize are parts of the human face.' Violi's first novel is swimming in unusual characters, from the people — both living and dead — who pass through the funeral home, to the eccentric members of Donna's church drama troupe. These characters and their many plot lines distract from Donna's journey to embrace both those around her and those who have died. Ages 14 - up. (May)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Although some wry comedy seeps into the narrative, Donna's focus, and the book's, remains on respecting the dead people and easing the grief of their families. As Donna learns how to care for dead people she also begins to care for living ones."
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