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2 Burnside Literature- A to Z

Brooklyn

by

Brooklyn Cover

ISBN13: 9781439138311
ISBN10: 1439138311
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 2 left in stock at $7.95!

 

Awards

The Rooster 2010 Morning News Tournament of Books Nominee

Review-A-Day

"So many dramas turn on a word misunderstood, taken out of context, or meant for other ears — spoken in anger or illness or inebriation; faultily reported, maliciously omitted, or lost in translation — that a stoic silence might reasonably seem one's best, or only, defense. But silence can be just as treacherous, Colm Toibin suggests in Brooklyn, a novel peppered with conversations like this:

"It's so good to see you," she said quietly to Patty.

"I think I know what you mean," Patty replied.

Benjamin Moser, Harper's Magazine (read the entire Harper's review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Hauntingly beautiful and heartbreaking, Colm Tóibín's sixth novel, Brooklyn, is set in Brooklyn and Ireland in the early 1950s, when one young woman crosses the ocean to make a new life for herself.

Eilis Lacey has come of age in small-town Ireland in the years following World War Two. Though skilled at bookkeeping, she cannot find a job in the miserable Irish economy. When an Irish priest from Brooklyn offers to sponsor Eilis in America — to live and work in a Brooklyn neighborhood just like Ireland — she decides she must go, leaving her fragile mother and her charismatic sister behind.

Eilis finds work in a department store on Fulton Street, and when she least expects it, finds love. Tony, a blond Italian from a big family, slowly wins her over with patient charm. He takes Eilis to Coney Island and Ebbets Field, and home to dinner in the two-room apartment he shares with his brothers and parents. He talks of having children who are Dodgers fans. But just as Eilis begins to fall in love with Tony, devastating news from Ireland threatens the promise of her future.

By far Tóibín's most instantly engaging and emotionally resonant novel, Brooklyn will make readers fall in love with his gorgeous writing and spellbinding characters.

Review:

"Colm Tóibín's engaging new novel, Brooklyn, will not bring to mind the fashionable borough of recent years nor Bed-Stuy beleaguered with the troubles of a Saturday night. Tóibín has revived the Brooklyn of an Irish-Catholic parish in the '50s, a setting appropriate to the narrow life of Eilis Lacey. Before Eilis ships out for a decent job in America, her village life is sketched in detail. The shops, pub, the hoity-toity and plainspoken people of Enniscorthy have such appeal on the page, it does seem a shame to leave. But how will we share the girl's longing for home, if home is not a gabby presence in her émigré tale? Tóibín's maneuvers draw us to the bright girl with a gift for numbers. With a keen eye, Eilis surveys her lonely, steady-on life: her job in the dry goods store, the rules and regulations of her rooming house — ladies only. The competitive hustle at the parish dances are so like the ones back home — it's something of a wonder I did not give up on the gentle tattle of her story, run a Netflix of the feline power struggle in Claire Booth Luce's The Women. Tóibín rescues his homesick shopgirl from narrow concerns, gives her a stop-by at Brooklyn College, a night course in commercial law. Her instructor is Joshua Rosenblum. Buying his book, the shopkeeper informs her, 'At least we did that, we got Rosenblum out.'

'You mean in the war?'

His reply when she asks again: 'In the holocaust, in the churben.'

The scene is eerie, falsely naïve. We may accept what a village girl from Ireland, which remained neutral during the war, may not have known, but Tóibín's delivery of the racial and ethnic discoveries of a clueless young woman are disconcerting. Eilis wonders if she should write home about the Jews, the Poles, the Italians she encounters, but shouldn't the novelist in pursuing those postwar years in Brooklyn, in the Irish enclave of the generous Father Flood, take the mike? The Irish vets I knew when I came to New York in the early '50s had been to that war; at least two I raised a glass with at the White Horse were from Brooklyn. When the stage is set for the love story, slowly and carefully as befits his serious girl, Tóibín is splendidly in control of Eilis's and Tony's courtship. He's Italian, you see, of a poor, caring family. I wanted to cast Brooklyn, with Rosalind Russell perfect for Rose, the sporty elder sister left to her career in Ireland. Can we get Philip Seymour Hoffman into that cassock again? J. Carol Naish, he played homeboy Italian, not the mob. I give away nothing in telling that the possibility of Eilis reclaiming an authentic and spirited life in Ireland turns Brooklyn into a stirring and satisfying moral tale. Tóibín, author of The Master, a fine-tuned novel on the lonely last years of Henry James, revisits, diminuendo, the wrenching finale of The Portrait of a Lady. What the future holds for Eilis in America is nothing like Isabel Archer's return to the morally corrupt Osmond. The decent fellow awaits. Will she be doomed to a tract house of the soul on Long Island? I hear John McCormick take the high note — alone in the gloaming with the shadows of the past — as Tóibín's good girl contemplates the lost promise of Brooklyn." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

For the second time in three weeks I have before me a work of fiction about the lives of Irish immigrants in the United States. Previously, it was Mary Beth Keane's heartfelt if slow-moving first novel, The Walking People. Now we have Brooklyn, the sixth novel by the eminent Irish writer Colm Toibin. Probably the timing is pure coincidence rather than evidence of a new literary trend,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[A]n aching lyricism reminiscent of the mature Henry James...[H]ighly recommended." Library Journal

Review:

"A fine and touching novel, persuasive proof of Tóibín's ever-increasing skills and range." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

Colm Tóibín...is an expert, patient fisherman of submerged emotions...[He] quietly, modestly shows how place can assert itself, enfolding the visitor, staking its claim." New York Times

Synopsis:

From the award-winning author of The Master comes a moving historical novel set in Brooklyn and Ireland in the early 1950s, concerning a young woman torn between her family and her past in Ireland and the American who wins her heart.

Synopsis:

From the award-winning author of The Master, a hauntingly compelling novel—by far TÓibÍn’s most accessible book—set in Brooklyn and Ireland in the early 1950s about a young woman torn between her family in Ireland and the american who wins her heart.

Eilis Lacey has come of age in small-town Ireland in the years following World War Two. Though skilled at bookkeeping, Eilis cannot find a proper job in the miserable Irish economy.

When an Irish priest from Brooklyn visits the household and offers to sponsor Eilis in America—to live and work in a Brooklyn neighborhood "just like Ireland"—she realizes she must go, leaving her fragile mother and sister behind.

Eilis finds work in a department store on Fulton Street, and studies accounting at Brooklyn College, and, when she least expects it, finds love. Tony, a blond Italian, slowly wins her over with persistent charm. He takes Eilis to Coney Island and Ebbets Field, and home to dinner in the two-room apartment he shares with his brothers and parents. Eilis is in love. But just as she begins to consider what this means, devastating news from Ireland threatens the promise of her new life.

With the emotional resonance of Alice McDermott’s At Weddings and Wakes, Brooklyn is by far TÓibÍn’s most inviting, engaging novel. 

Synopsis:

andlt;bandgt;From the award-winning author of andlt;iandgt;The Masterandlt;/iandgt;, a hauntingly compelling noveland#8212;by far Tand#243;iband#237;nand#8217;s most accessible bookand#8212;set in Brooklyn and Ireland in the early 1950s about a young woman torn between her family in Ireland and the american who wins her heart.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;/bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Eilis Lacey has come of age in small-town Ireland in the years following World War Two. Though skilled at bookkeeping, Eilis cannot find a proper job in the miserable Irish economy. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;When an Irish priest from Brooklyn visits the household and offers to sponsor Eilis in Americaand#8212;to live and work in a Brooklyn neighborhood "just like Ireland"and#8212;she realizes she must go, leaving her fragile mother and sister behind. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Eilis finds work in a department store on Fulton Street, and studies accounting at Brooklyn College, and, when she least expects it, finds love. Tony, a blond Italian, slowly wins her over with persistent charm. He takes Eilis to Coney Island and Ebbets Field, and home to dinner in the two-room apartment he shares with his brothers and parents. Eilis is in love. But just as she begins to consider what this means, devastating news from Ireland threatens the promise of her new life. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;With the emotional resonance of Alice McDermottand#8217;s andlt;iandgt;At Weddings and Wakesandlt;/iandgt;, andlt;iandgt;Brooklyn andlt;/iandgt;is by far Tand#243;iband#237;nand#8217;s most inviting, engaging novel.andnbsp;

About the Author

Colm Tóibín is the author of five previous novels, The Master, The South, The Heather Blazing, The Story of the Night, and The Blackwater Lightship, which was shortlisted for the 1999 Booker Prize. He lives in Dublin.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lvilches7, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by lvilches7)
It is the novel of New York and the way immigration molded it. It is the novel of honesty towards love and decision making. It is the novel with the magnificent use of the English language.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781439138311
Author:
Toibin, Colm
Publisher:
Scribner Book Company
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
History
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
man booker prize; ireland; wexford; dublin; inniscorthy; pen festival; lambda; gay fiction; irish fiction; literary fiction; costa book award; stanford; princeton; columbia; UT Austin; IMPAC award; the master; nora webster; brooklyn; nypl; new yorker; tes
Subject:
man booker prize; ireland; wexford; dublin; inniscorthy; pen festival; lambda; gay fiction; irish fiction; literary fiction; costa book award; stanford; princeton; columbia; UT Austin; IMPAC award; the master; nora webster; brooklyn; nypl; new yorker; tes
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20090531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
rough front
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.62 in 15.645 oz

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Brooklyn Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9781439138311 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Colm Tóibín's engaging new novel, Brooklyn, will not bring to mind the fashionable borough of recent years nor Bed-Stuy beleaguered with the troubles of a Saturday night. Tóibín has revived the Brooklyn of an Irish-Catholic parish in the '50s, a setting appropriate to the narrow life of Eilis Lacey. Before Eilis ships out for a decent job in America, her village life is sketched in detail. The shops, pub, the hoity-toity and plainspoken people of Enniscorthy have such appeal on the page, it does seem a shame to leave. But how will we share the girl's longing for home, if home is not a gabby presence in her émigré tale? Tóibín's maneuvers draw us to the bright girl with a gift for numbers. With a keen eye, Eilis surveys her lonely, steady-on life: her job in the dry goods store, the rules and regulations of her rooming house — ladies only. The competitive hustle at the parish dances are so like the ones back home — it's something of a wonder I did not give up on the gentle tattle of her story, run a Netflix of the feline power struggle in Claire Booth Luce's The Women. Tóibín rescues his homesick shopgirl from narrow concerns, gives her a stop-by at Brooklyn College, a night course in commercial law. Her instructor is Joshua Rosenblum. Buying his book, the shopkeeper informs her, 'At least we did that, we got Rosenblum out.'

'You mean in the war?'

His reply when she asks again: 'In the holocaust, in the churben.'

The scene is eerie, falsely naïve. We may accept what a village girl from Ireland, which remained neutral during the war, may not have known, but Tóibín's delivery of the racial and ethnic discoveries of a clueless young woman are disconcerting. Eilis wonders if she should write home about the Jews, the Poles, the Italians she encounters, but shouldn't the novelist in pursuing those postwar years in Brooklyn, in the Irish enclave of the generous Father Flood, take the mike? The Irish vets I knew when I came to New York in the early '50s had been to that war; at least two I raised a glass with at the White Horse were from Brooklyn. When the stage is set for the love story, slowly and carefully as befits his serious girl, Tóibín is splendidly in control of Eilis's and Tony's courtship. He's Italian, you see, of a poor, caring family. I wanted to cast Brooklyn, with Rosalind Russell perfect for Rose, the sporty elder sister left to her career in Ireland. Can we get Philip Seymour Hoffman into that cassock again? J. Carol Naish, he played homeboy Italian, not the mob. I give away nothing in telling that the possibility of Eilis reclaiming an authentic and spirited life in Ireland turns Brooklyn into a stirring and satisfying moral tale. Tóibín, author of The Master, a fine-tuned novel on the lonely last years of Henry James, revisits, diminuendo, the wrenching finale of The Portrait of a Lady. What the future holds for Eilis in America is nothing like Isabel Archer's return to the morally corrupt Osmond. The decent fellow awaits. Will she be doomed to a tract house of the soul on Long Island? I hear John McCormick take the high note — alone in the gloaming with the shadows of the past — as Tóibín's good girl contemplates the lost promise of Brooklyn." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

"Review A Day" by , "So many dramas turn on a word misunderstood, taken out of context, or meant for other ears — spoken in anger or illness or inebriation; faultily reported, maliciously omitted, or lost in translation — that a stoic silence might reasonably seem one's best, or only, defense. But silence can be just as treacherous, Colm Toibin suggests in Brooklyn, a novel peppered with conversations like this:

"It's so good to see you," she said quietly to Patty.

"I think I know what you mean," Patty replied.

Benjamin Moser, Harper's Magazine (read the entire Harper's review)

"Review" by , "[A]n aching lyricism reminiscent of the mature Henry James...[H]ighly recommended."
"Review" by , "A fine and touching novel, persuasive proof of Tóibín's ever-increasing skills and range."
"Review" by , Colm Tóibín...is an expert, patient fisherman of submerged emotions...[He] quietly, modestly shows how place can assert itself, enfolding the visitor, staking its claim."
"Synopsis" by , From the award-winning author of The Master comes a moving historical novel set in Brooklyn and Ireland in the early 1950s, concerning a young woman torn between her family and her past in Ireland and the American who wins her heart.
"Synopsis" by , From the award-winning author of The Master, a hauntingly compelling novel—by far TÓibÍn’s most accessible book—set in Brooklyn and Ireland in the early 1950s about a young woman torn between her family in Ireland and the american who wins her heart.

Eilis Lacey has come of age in small-town Ireland in the years following World War Two. Though skilled at bookkeeping, Eilis cannot find a proper job in the miserable Irish economy.

When an Irish priest from Brooklyn visits the household and offers to sponsor Eilis in America—to live and work in a Brooklyn neighborhood "just like Ireland"—she realizes she must go, leaving her fragile mother and sister behind.

Eilis finds work in a department store on Fulton Street, and studies accounting at Brooklyn College, and, when she least expects it, finds love. Tony, a blond Italian, slowly wins her over with persistent charm. He takes Eilis to Coney Island and Ebbets Field, and home to dinner in the two-room apartment he shares with his brothers and parents. Eilis is in love. But just as she begins to consider what this means, devastating news from Ireland threatens the promise of her new life.

With the emotional resonance of Alice McDermott’s At Weddings and Wakes, Brooklyn is by far TÓibÍn’s most inviting, engaging novel. 

"Synopsis" by , andlt;bandgt;From the award-winning author of andlt;iandgt;The Masterandlt;/iandgt;, a hauntingly compelling noveland#8212;by far Tand#243;iband#237;nand#8217;s most accessible bookand#8212;set in Brooklyn and Ireland in the early 1950s about a young woman torn between her family in Ireland and the american who wins her heart.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;/bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Eilis Lacey has come of age in small-town Ireland in the years following World War Two. Though skilled at bookkeeping, Eilis cannot find a proper job in the miserable Irish economy. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;When an Irish priest from Brooklyn visits the household and offers to sponsor Eilis in Americaand#8212;to live and work in a Brooklyn neighborhood "just like Ireland"and#8212;she realizes she must go, leaving her fragile mother and sister behind. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Eilis finds work in a department store on Fulton Street, and studies accounting at Brooklyn College, and, when she least expects it, finds love. Tony, a blond Italian, slowly wins her over with persistent charm. He takes Eilis to Coney Island and Ebbets Field, and home to dinner in the two-room apartment he shares with his brothers and parents. Eilis is in love. But just as she begins to consider what this means, devastating news from Ireland threatens the promise of her new life. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;With the emotional resonance of Alice McDermottand#8217;s andlt;iandgt;At Weddings and Wakesandlt;/iandgt;, andlt;iandgt;Brooklyn andlt;/iandgt;is by far Tand#243;iband#237;nand#8217;s most inviting, engaging novel.andnbsp;
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