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Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power

by

Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Hitlers rise to power, Germanys march to the abyss, as seen through the eyes of Americans—diplomats, military, expats, visiting authors, Olympic athletes—who watched horrified and up close. By tapping a rich vein of personal testimonies, Hitlerland offers a gripping narrative full of surprising twists—and a startlingly fresh perspective on this heavily dissected era.

Some of the Americans in Weimar and then Hitlers Germany were merely casual observers, others deliberately blind; a few were Nazi apologists. But most slowly began to understand the horror of what was unfolding, even when they found it difficult to grasp the breadth of the catastrophe.

Among the journalists, William Shirer, Edgar Mowrer, and Dorothy Thompson were increasingly alarmed. Consul General George Messersmith stood out among the American diplomats because of his passion and courage. Truman Smith, the first American official to meet Hitler, was an astute political observer and a remarkably resourceful military attaché. Historian William Dodd, whom FDR tapped as ambassador in Hitlers Berlin, left disillusioned; his daughter Martha scandalized the embassy with her procession of lovers from her initial infatuation with Nazis she took up with. She ended as a Soviet spy.

On the scene were George Kennan, who would become famous as the architect of containment; Richard Helms, who rose to the top of the CIA; Howard K. Smith, who would coanchor the ABC Evening News. The list of prominent visitors included writers Sinclair Lewis and Thomas Wolfe, famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, the great athlete Jesse Owens, newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, and black sociologist and historian W.E.B. Dubois.

Observing Hitler and his movement up close, the most perceptive of these Americans helped their reluctant countrymen begin to understand the nature of Nazi Germany as it ruthlessly eliminated political opponents, instilled hatred of Jews and anyone deemed a member of an inferior race, and readied its military and its people for a war for global domination. They helped prepare Americans for the years of struggle ahead.

Review:

"This account by former Newsweek staffer Nagorski (The Greatest Battle) offers precise firsthand observations of Hitler and his place in history, beginning in the 1920s, as people tried to decide whether he could be dismissed as a nonentity or posed a serious threat to world order. For instance, one American journalist in 1932 called Hitler 'effeminate' while also acknowledging the 'little corporal's' ability to 'smell the trend of mass feeling' of discontent. Nagorski draws on the writings and recollections of Americans who witnessed Hitler's meteoric rise; the result is a multidimensional view of the Austrian-born tyrant. The invaluable element of this character study of the enigmatic führer is the accumulative clout of the comments of famed American outsiders such as writers Sinclair Lewis and Thomas Wolfe; journalists Edward R. Murrow, Dorothy Thompson, and William Shirer; diplomat George Kennan; and aviator Charles Lindbergh, who called Hitler 'a great man.' Nagorski is drawing from the same well as Erik Larson's In the Garden of Beasts, while lacking its strong narrative center. But Nagorski's account is rich in anecdotal detail about how a man dismissed by many could hypnotize a nation and terrorize the world. 8 pages of b&w photos. Agent: Robert Gottlieb, Trident Media Group." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Hitler’s rise to power, Germany’s march to the abyss, as seen by Americans—diplomats, military, expats, visiting authors, Olympic athletes—who watched horrified and up close.

Some of the Americans in Hitler’s Germany were merely casual observers, others deliberately blind, a few were Nazi apologists. But most began slowly to understand what was unfolding, even when they found it difficult to grasp the breadth of the catastrophe.

Among the journalists, William Shirer understood what was happening. Edgar Mowrer, Dorothy Thompson, and Sigrid Schultz, reporters, were alarmed. Consul General George Messersmith distinguished. Truman Smith, the first American official to meet Hitler, was an astute political observer. Historian William Dodd, who FDR tapped as ambassador in Berlin, left disillusioned; his daughter Martha scandalized the embassy with her procession of lovers, Nazis she took up with; she ended as a Soviet spy.

On the scene were George Kennan, the architect of containment; Richard Helms, who rose to the top of the CIA. The writers Sinclair Lewis and Thomas Wolfe, famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, and the great athlete Jesse Owens came through Germany; so did a younger generation of journalists—Richard Hottelet, Hans V. Kaltenborn, Howard K. Smith, and Ed Murrow.

These Americans helped their reluctant countrymen begin to understand Nazi Germany as it ruthlessly eliminated political opponents, instilled hatred of Jews and anyone deemed a member of an inferior race, and readied its military and its people for a war for global domination. They helped prepare Americans for the years of struggle ahead.

Synopsis:

andlt;bandgt;Hitlerand#8217;s rise to power, Germanyand#8217;s march to the abyss, as seen by Americansand#8212;diplomats, military, expats, visiting authors, Olympic athletesand#8212;who watched horrified and up close.andlt;/bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Some of the Americans in Hitlerand#8217;s Germany were merely casual observers, others deliberately blind, a few were Nazi apologists. But most began slowly to understand what was unfolding, even when they found it difficult to grasp the breadth of the catastrophe.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Among the journalists, William Shirer understood what was happening. Edgar Mowrer, Dorothy Thompson,andnbsp;and Sigrid Schultz, reporters, were alarmed. Consul General George Messersmith distinguished. Truman Smith, the first American official to meet Hitler, was an astute political observer. Historian William Dodd, who FDR tapped as ambassador in Berlin, left disillusioned; his daughter Martha scandalized the embassy with her procession of lovers, Nazis she took up with; she ended as a Soviet spy.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;On the scene were George Kennan, the architect of containment; Richard Helms, who rose to the top of the CIA. The writersandnbsp;Sinclair Lewis and Thomas Wolfe, famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, and the great athlete Jesse Owens came through Germany; so did a younger generation of journalistsand#8212;Richard Hottelet, Hans V. Kaltenborn, Howard K. Smith, and Ed Murrow.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;These Americans helped their reluctant countrymen begin to understand Nazi Germany as it ruthlessly eliminated political opponents, instilled hatred of Jews and anyone deemed a member of an inferior race, and readied its military and its people for a war for global domination. They helped prepare Americans for the years of struggle ahead.

About the Author

Andrew Nagorski is a senior editor at Newsweek International. An award-winning Newsweek bureau chief in Moscow, Berlin and several other postings, he is the author of three previous books, including The Greatest Battle and the novel Last Stop Vienna, a Washington Post bestseller. He lives in Pelham Manor, New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781439191002
Author:
Nagorski, Andrew
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Military-World War II General
Subject:
World History-Germany
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20120331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16-pp b-w insert
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.25 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » Political
History and Social Science » Europe » Germany » Nazi Germany
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Germany » General
History and Social Science » World History » Germany » Nazi Germany

Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power Used Hardcover
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$19.50 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781439191002 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This account by former Newsweek staffer Nagorski (The Greatest Battle) offers precise firsthand observations of Hitler and his place in history, beginning in the 1920s, as people tried to decide whether he could be dismissed as a nonentity or posed a serious threat to world order. For instance, one American journalist in 1932 called Hitler 'effeminate' while also acknowledging the 'little corporal's' ability to 'smell the trend of mass feeling' of discontent. Nagorski draws on the writings and recollections of Americans who witnessed Hitler's meteoric rise; the result is a multidimensional view of the Austrian-born tyrant. The invaluable element of this character study of the enigmatic führer is the accumulative clout of the comments of famed American outsiders such as writers Sinclair Lewis and Thomas Wolfe; journalists Edward R. Murrow, Dorothy Thompson, and William Shirer; diplomat George Kennan; and aviator Charles Lindbergh, who called Hitler 'a great man.' Nagorski is drawing from the same well as Erik Larson's In the Garden of Beasts, while lacking its strong narrative center. But Nagorski's account is rich in anecdotal detail about how a man dismissed by many could hypnotize a nation and terrorize the world. 8 pages of b&w photos. Agent: Robert Gottlieb, Trident Media Group." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Hitler’s rise to power, Germany’s march to the abyss, as seen by Americans—diplomats, military, expats, visiting authors, Olympic athletes—who watched horrified and up close.

Some of the Americans in Hitler’s Germany were merely casual observers, others deliberately blind, a few were Nazi apologists. But most began slowly to understand what was unfolding, even when they found it difficult to grasp the breadth of the catastrophe.

Among the journalists, William Shirer understood what was happening. Edgar Mowrer, Dorothy Thompson, and Sigrid Schultz, reporters, were alarmed. Consul General George Messersmith distinguished. Truman Smith, the first American official to meet Hitler, was an astute political observer. Historian William Dodd, who FDR tapped as ambassador in Berlin, left disillusioned; his daughter Martha scandalized the embassy with her procession of lovers, Nazis she took up with; she ended as a Soviet spy.

On the scene were George Kennan, the architect of containment; Richard Helms, who rose to the top of the CIA. The writers Sinclair Lewis and Thomas Wolfe, famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, and the great athlete Jesse Owens came through Germany; so did a younger generation of journalists—Richard Hottelet, Hans V. Kaltenborn, Howard K. Smith, and Ed Murrow.

These Americans helped their reluctant countrymen begin to understand Nazi Germany as it ruthlessly eliminated political opponents, instilled hatred of Jews and anyone deemed a member of an inferior race, and readied its military and its people for a war for global domination. They helped prepare Americans for the years of struggle ahead.

"Synopsis" by , andlt;bandgt;Hitlerand#8217;s rise to power, Germanyand#8217;s march to the abyss, as seen by Americansand#8212;diplomats, military, expats, visiting authors, Olympic athletesand#8212;who watched horrified and up close.andlt;/bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Some of the Americans in Hitlerand#8217;s Germany were merely casual observers, others deliberately blind, a few were Nazi apologists. But most began slowly to understand what was unfolding, even when they found it difficult to grasp the breadth of the catastrophe.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Among the journalists, William Shirer understood what was happening. Edgar Mowrer, Dorothy Thompson,andnbsp;and Sigrid Schultz, reporters, were alarmed. Consul General George Messersmith distinguished. Truman Smith, the first American official to meet Hitler, was an astute political observer. Historian William Dodd, who FDR tapped as ambassador in Berlin, left disillusioned; his daughter Martha scandalized the embassy with her procession of lovers, Nazis she took up with; she ended as a Soviet spy.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;On the scene were George Kennan, the architect of containment; Richard Helms, who rose to the top of the CIA. The writersandnbsp;Sinclair Lewis and Thomas Wolfe, famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, and the great athlete Jesse Owens came through Germany; so did a younger generation of journalistsand#8212;Richard Hottelet, Hans V. Kaltenborn, Howard K. Smith, and Ed Murrow.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;These Americans helped their reluctant countrymen begin to understand Nazi Germany as it ruthlessly eliminated political opponents, instilled hatred of Jews and anyone deemed a member of an inferior race, and readied its military and its people for a war for global domination. They helped prepare Americans for the years of struggle ahead.
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