The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 18, 2014

Lin Enger: IMG Knowing vs. Knowing



On a hot July evening years ago, my Toyota Tercel overheated on a flat stretch of highway north of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A steam geyser shot up from... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The High Divide

    Lin Enger 9781616203757

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$11.00
List price: $20.00
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
1 Partner Warehouse General- General

This title in other editions

We Learn Nothing: Essays and Cartoons

by

We Learn Nothing: Essays and Cartoons Cover

ISBN13: 9781439198704
ISBN10: 1439198705
Condition: Student Owned
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $11.00!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

In We Learn Nothing, satirical cartoonist Tim Kreider turns his funny, brutally honest eye to the dark truths of the human condition, asking big questions about human-sized problems: What if you survive a brush with death and it doesnt change you? Why do we fall in love with people we dont even like? What do you do when a friend becomes obsessed with a political movement and wont let you ignore it? How do you react when someone youve known for years unexpectedly changes genders?

Irreverent yet earnest, he shares deeply personal experiences and readily confesses his vices — betraying his addiction to lovesickness, for example, and the gray area that he sees between the bold romantic gesture and the illegal act of stalking.

In these pages, we witness Kreider's tight-knit crew struggle to deal with a pathologically lying friend who wont ask for help. We watch him navigate a fraught relationship with a lonely uncle in jail who — as he degenerates into madness — continues to plead for the support of his conflicted nephew. And we cringe as he gets outed as a "moby" at a Tea Party rally. In moments like these, we cant help but ask ourselves: How far would we go for our own family members, and when is someone simply too far gone to save? Are there truly "bad people," and if so, should we change them? With a perfect combination of humor and pathos, these essays, peppered with Kreider's signature cartoons, leave us with newfound wisdom and a unique prism through which to examine our own chaotic journeys through life.

Uncompromisingly candid, sometimes mercilessly so, these comically illustrated essays are rigorous exercises in self-awareness and self-reflection. These are the conversations you have only with best friends or total strangers, late at night over drinks, near closing time.

Review:

"Political cartoonist Kreider's humorous collection of personal essays begins with his near-fatal neck stabbing; his failure to learn enduring life lessons from this traumatic event provides the book's title, tone, and argument. Throughout, Kreider (Twilight of the Assholes) locates the right simile and the pith of situations as he carefully catalogues humanity's inventive and manifold ways of failing: a secretive friend lives and dies behind a gigantic front of lies; another relocates to Missouri to prepare for peak oil Armageddon; and a delusional uncle with a knack for heinous crime expires in prison. Kreider's shortcomings — in romance, friendship, empathy for Tea Partiers, life itself — are also recounted. The essays that contradict the book's title prove especially strong. In the moving 'Sister World,' adoptee Kreider reveals how meeting his biological sisters teaches him about the depths and degrees of relatedness, and how to handle uncharacteristic profusions of love. In 'An Insult to the Brain,' Kreider reads Tristram Shandy aloud to his convalescing mother, and the novel's lessons on tedium and time, and formal eccentricities, bleed into his essay. His piece on the Tea Party, 'When They're Not Assholes,' sums up human nature: 'The truth is, there are not two kinds of people. There's only one: the kind that loves to divide up into gangs who hate each other's guts.' Agent: Meg Thompson, Einstein Thompson Agency." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Tim Kreider may be the most subversive soul in America and his subversions — by turns public and intimate, political and cultural — are just what our weary, mixed-up nation needs. The essays in We Learn Nothing are for anybody who believes it's high time for some answers, damn it." Richard Russo, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Empire Falls

Review:

"Whether he is expressing himself in highly original cartoons that are hilarious visual poems, or in prose that exposes our self-delusions by the way he probes his own experience with candor, Tim Kreider is a writer-artist who brilliantly understands that every humorist at his best is a liberator. Because he is irreverent, makes us laugh, ruffles the feathers of the pretentious and the pompous, and keeps us honest, We Learn Nothing is a pleasure from its first page to the last." Charles Johnson, bestselling author of Middle Passage

Review:

"Tim Kreider's writing is heartbreaking, brutal and hilarious — usually at the same time. He can do in a few pages what I need several hours of screen time and tens of millions to accomplish. And he does it better. Come to think of it, I'd rather not do a blurb. I am beginning to feel bad about myself." Judd Apatow

Synopsis:

Satirical cartoonist Tim Kreider here turns his most unflinchingly funny, brutally honest mind to the dark truths of the human condition.

Tim Kreider spent the past fifteen years of his life as a political cartoonist with an avid cult following, exposing the hypocrisies of our government and being, as author Myla Goldberg put it, "funny and crazy and brave enough to proclaim as truths the things the rest of us are too chickenshit to say out loud." In 2009 he began writing for the New York Times, penning popular essays about love, death, and existential dread. Now, We Learn Nothing takes the reader even deeper into Kreider's unique worldview.

Combining the keen insight of David Foster Wallace with the absurd humor of David Sedaris, Kreider confronts some of the knottiest and most intimate problems in life. The book feels like philosophical or spiritual inquiries, asking big questions about human-sized problems: What if you survive a brush with death and it doesn't change you? Why do we fall in love with people we don't even like? What do you do when a friend becomes obsessed with a political movement and won't let you ignore it? How do you react when someone you've known for years unexpectedly changes genders?

Uncompromisingly honest, sometimes mercilessly so, these comically illustrated essays are rigorous, deeply personal exercises in self-awareness and self-reflection, in routing out delusion with the insight only hindsight can provide. These are the conversations you only have with best friends or total strangers, late at night over drinks, near closing time.

About the Author

Tim Kreider is a political cartoonist and a writer for the New York Times. His popular cartoon The Pain — When Will It End? has been collected in three books by Fantagraphics. He divides his time between New York City and the Chesapeake Bay.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

remarkableone, January 16, 2013 (view all comments by remarkableone)
Really very good; funny and thought-provoking at the same time, with occasional moments of eloquence. Really, all you can ask for from a book of essays--plus cartoons!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781439198704
Subtitle:
Essays and Cartoons
Author:
Kreider, Tim
Publisher:
Free Press
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Humor-Anthologies
Publication Date:
20120612
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in

Other books you might like

  1. Ride a Cockhorse Used Trade Paper $10.95
  2. The Dog of the South Used Trade Paper $7.95
  3. The Situation and the Story: The Art... New Trade Paper $15.00
  4. Telegraph Avenue
    Sale Mass Market $6.98
  5. The Dangers of Proximal Alphabets Sale Trade Paper $7.98
  6. NW
    Used Hardcover $9.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Anthologies
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Cartoons » Comics
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Narrative
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Political
Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Essays

We Learn Nothing: Essays and Cartoons Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.00 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Free Press - English 9781439198704 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Political cartoonist Kreider's humorous collection of personal essays begins with his near-fatal neck stabbing; his failure to learn enduring life lessons from this traumatic event provides the book's title, tone, and argument. Throughout, Kreider (Twilight of the Assholes) locates the right simile and the pith of situations as he carefully catalogues humanity's inventive and manifold ways of failing: a secretive friend lives and dies behind a gigantic front of lies; another relocates to Missouri to prepare for peak oil Armageddon; and a delusional uncle with a knack for heinous crime expires in prison. Kreider's shortcomings — in romance, friendship, empathy for Tea Partiers, life itself — are also recounted. The essays that contradict the book's title prove especially strong. In the moving 'Sister World,' adoptee Kreider reveals how meeting his biological sisters teaches him about the depths and degrees of relatedness, and how to handle uncharacteristic profusions of love. In 'An Insult to the Brain,' Kreider reads Tristram Shandy aloud to his convalescing mother, and the novel's lessons on tedium and time, and formal eccentricities, bleed into his essay. His piece on the Tea Party, 'When They're Not Assholes,' sums up human nature: 'The truth is, there are not two kinds of people. There's only one: the kind that loves to divide up into gangs who hate each other's guts.' Agent: Meg Thompson, Einstein Thompson Agency." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Tim Kreider may be the most subversive soul in America and his subversions — by turns public and intimate, political and cultural — are just what our weary, mixed-up nation needs. The essays in We Learn Nothing are for anybody who believes it's high time for some answers, damn it."
"Review" by , "Whether he is expressing himself in highly original cartoons that are hilarious visual poems, or in prose that exposes our self-delusions by the way he probes his own experience with candor, Tim Kreider is a writer-artist who brilliantly understands that every humorist at his best is a liberator. Because he is irreverent, makes us laugh, ruffles the feathers of the pretentious and the pompous, and keeps us honest, We Learn Nothing is a pleasure from its first page to the last."
"Review" by , "Tim Kreider's writing is heartbreaking, brutal and hilarious — usually at the same time. He can do in a few pages what I need several hours of screen time and tens of millions to accomplish. And he does it better. Come to think of it, I'd rather not do a blurb. I am beginning to feel bad about myself."
"Synopsis" by , Satirical cartoonist Tim Kreider here turns his most unflinchingly funny, brutally honest mind to the dark truths of the human condition.

Tim Kreider spent the past fifteen years of his life as a political cartoonist with an avid cult following, exposing the hypocrisies of our government and being, as author Myla Goldberg put it, "funny and crazy and brave enough to proclaim as truths the things the rest of us are too chickenshit to say out loud." In 2009 he began writing for the New York Times, penning popular essays about love, death, and existential dread. Now, We Learn Nothing takes the reader even deeper into Kreider's unique worldview.

Combining the keen insight of David Foster Wallace with the absurd humor of David Sedaris, Kreider confronts some of the knottiest and most intimate problems in life. The book feels like philosophical or spiritual inquiries, asking big questions about human-sized problems: What if you survive a brush with death and it doesn't change you? Why do we fall in love with people we don't even like? What do you do when a friend becomes obsessed with a political movement and won't let you ignore it? How do you react when someone you've known for years unexpectedly changes genders?

Uncompromisingly honest, sometimes mercilessly so, these comically illustrated essays are rigorous, deeply personal exercises in self-awareness and self-reflection, in routing out delusion with the insight only hindsight can provide. These are the conversations you only have with best friends or total strangers, late at night over drinks, near closing time.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.