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1 Burnside Children's Young Adult- Biography

The Boy on the Wooden Box: How the Impossible Became Possible . . . on Schindler's List

by

The Boy on the Wooden Box: How the Impossible Became Possible . . . on Schindler's List Cover

ISBN13: 9781442497818
ISBN10: 1442497815
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the #1 andlt;I andgt;New York Timesandlt;/Iandgt; bestseller, Leon Leyson (born Leib Lezjon) was only ten years old when the Nazis invaded Poland and his family was forced to relocate to the Krakow ghetto.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Leon Leyson (born Leib Lezjon) was only ten years old when the Nazis invaded Poland and his family was forced to relocate to the Krakow ghetto. With incredible luck, perseverance, and grit, Leyson was able to survive the sadism of the Nazis, including that of the demonic Amon Goeth, commandant of Plaszow, the concentration camp outside Krakow. Ultimately, it was the generosity and cunning of one man, a man named Oskar Schindler, who saved Leon Leysonand#8217;s life, and the lives of his mother, his father, and two of his four siblings, by adding their names to his list of workers in his factoryand#8212;a list that became world renowned: Schindlerand#8217;s List.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;This, the only memoir published by a former Schindlerand#8217;s List child, perfectly captures the innocence of a small boy who goes through the unthinkable. Most notable is the lack of rancor, the lack of venom, and the abundance of dignity in Mr. Leysonand#8217;s telling. andlt;Iandgt;The Boy on the Wooden Boxandlt;/Iandgt; is a legacy of hope, a memoir unlike anything youand#8217;ve ever read.

Review:

"Leyson, who died in January at age 83, was No. 289 on Schindler's list and its youngest member. He was just 13 when Leyson's father convinced Oskar Schindler to let 'Little Leyson' (as Schindler knew him) and other family members find refuge in the Emalia factory; Leyson was so small he had to stand on a box to work the machinery. Leyson and his coauthors give this wrenching memoir some literary styling, but the book is at its most powerful when Leyson relays the events in a straightforward manner, as if in a deposition, from the shock of seeing his once-proud father shamed by anti-Semitism to the deprivation that defined his youth. Schindler remains a kindly but enigmatic figure in Leyson's retelling, occasionally doting but usually distant. Leyson makes it clear that being 'Schindler Jews' offered a thread of hope, but it never shielded them from the chaos and evil that surrounded them. Readers will close the book feeling that they have made a genuinely personal connection to this remarkable man. Ages 9 — 14. Agent: Peter Steinberg, the Steinberg Agency. (Aug.) â–" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Even in the darkest of times—especially in the darkest of times—there is room for strength and bravery. A remarkable memoir from Leon Leyson, one of the youngest children to survive the Holocaust on Oskar Schindler’s list.

Leon Leyson (born Leib Lezjon) was only ten years old when the Nazis invaded Poland and his family was forced to relocate to the Krakow ghetto. With incredible luck, perseverance, and grit, Leyson was able to survive the sadism of the Nazis, including that of the demonic Amon Goeth, commandant of Plaszow, the concentration camp outside Krakow. Ultimately, it was the generosity and cunning of one man, a man named Oskar Schindler, who saved Leon Leyson’s life, and the lives of his mother, his father, and two of his four siblings, by adding their names to his list of workers in his factory—a list that became world renowned: Schindler’s List.

This, the only memoir published by a former Schindler’s List child, perfectly captures the innocence of a small boy who goes through the unthinkable. Most notable is the lack of rancor, the lack of venom, and the abundance of dignity in Mr. Leyson’s telling. The Boy on the Wooden Box is a legacy of hope, a memoir unlike anything you’ve ever read.

About the Author

Leon Leyson was one of the youngest members of Schindlerand#8217;s List. He brings a unique perspective to the history of the Holocaust and a powerful message of courage and humanity. Believing that no one would be interested in his story, he rarely spoke about his experiences until the film andlt;iandgt;Schindlerand#8217;s List andlt;/iandgt;received worldwide attention.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;A graduate of Los Angeles City College; California State University, Los Angeles; and Pepperdine University, he taught at Huntington Park High School in Huntington Park, California, for thirty-nine years. In recognition of his many accomplishments as educator and witness to the Holocaust, Mr. Leyson was awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Chapman University.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Mr. Leyson passed away in January 2013, leaving behind his wife, Lis; their two children; and six grandchildren.Dr. Marilyn J. Harran is the author of andlt;iandgt;The Holocuast Chronicle: A History in Words and Picturesandlt;/iandgt;, which has sold more than 250,000 copies. She holds the Stern Chair in Holocaust Education at Chapman University, where she is also the founding director of the Rodgers Center for Holocaust Education. Dr. Harran is a 2008 recipient of the Spirit of Anne Frank Award and a member of the board of the Association of Holocaust Organizations. She lives in Orange, California.Elizabeth B. Leyson, Leonand#8217;s wife, lives in Fullerton, California.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

The Family that Reads, December 5, 2013 (view all comments by The Family that Reads)
Painting Pixie, age 8, says: The Boy on the Wooden Box is about a 10 year old Jewish boy who lives in Krakow, Poland at the beginning of WWII. The Nazis start to take over Poland. Leon Leyson and his family survive the Holocaust with the help of Oskar Schindler. This story is from a kid's perspective. It is a great story of survival and a boy's love for his family. If you have a kid interested in WWII - this would be a great gift.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781442497818
Author:
Leyson, Leon
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Author:
To Be Announced
Author:
Leyson, Elisabeth B.
Author:
isabeth B. Leyson
Author:
Harran, Marilyn J.
Author:
E'L
Author:
Heiden, Jamie
Subject:
Holocaust
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Biography
Subject:
andlt;Iandgt;New York Times andlt;/Iandgt;Bestseller, #1 Bestseller
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20130831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 4 up to 9
Language:
English
Illustrations:
f-c jkt (fx: soft touch; matte)+b-w int.
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
7.5 x 5.5 in
Age Level:
from 9 up to 14

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Related Subjects

Children's » History » World History
Children's » Nonfiction » Biographies
Children's » Nonfiction » World History » General
Children's » Religion » General
Children's » Religion » Judaism
Young Adult » Nonfiction » Biographies

The Boy on the Wooden Box: How the Impossible Became Possible . . . on Schindler's List Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Atheneum Books for Young Readers - English 9781442497818 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Leyson, who died in January at age 83, was No. 289 on Schindler's list and its youngest member. He was just 13 when Leyson's father convinced Oskar Schindler to let 'Little Leyson' (as Schindler knew him) and other family members find refuge in the Emalia factory; Leyson was so small he had to stand on a box to work the machinery. Leyson and his coauthors give this wrenching memoir some literary styling, but the book is at its most powerful when Leyson relays the events in a straightforward manner, as if in a deposition, from the shock of seeing his once-proud father shamed by anti-Semitism to the deprivation that defined his youth. Schindler remains a kindly but enigmatic figure in Leyson's retelling, occasionally doting but usually distant. Leyson makes it clear that being 'Schindler Jews' offered a thread of hope, but it never shielded them from the chaos and evil that surrounded them. Readers will close the book feeling that they have made a genuinely personal connection to this remarkable man. Ages 9 — 14. Agent: Peter Steinberg, the Steinberg Agency. (Aug.) â–" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Even in the darkest of times—especially in the darkest of times—there is room for strength and bravery. A remarkable memoir from Leon Leyson, one of the youngest children to survive the Holocaust on Oskar Schindler’s list.

Leon Leyson (born Leib Lezjon) was only ten years old when the Nazis invaded Poland and his family was forced to relocate to the Krakow ghetto. With incredible luck, perseverance, and grit, Leyson was able to survive the sadism of the Nazis, including that of the demonic Amon Goeth, commandant of Plaszow, the concentration camp outside Krakow. Ultimately, it was the generosity and cunning of one man, a man named Oskar Schindler, who saved Leon Leyson’s life, and the lives of his mother, his father, and two of his four siblings, by adding their names to his list of workers in his factory—a list that became world renowned: Schindler’s List.

This, the only memoir published by a former Schindler’s List child, perfectly captures the innocence of a small boy who goes through the unthinkable. Most notable is the lack of rancor, the lack of venom, and the abundance of dignity in Mr. Leyson’s telling. The Boy on the Wooden Box is a legacy of hope, a memoir unlike anything you’ve ever read.

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