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I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy

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I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time, empowering us in constantly evolving ways. We can all now be reporters, alerting the world to breaking news of a natural disaster; we can participate in crowd-sourced scientific research; and we can become investigators, helping the police solve crimes. Social networks have even helped to bring down governments. But they have also greatly accelerated the erosion of our personal privacy rights, and any one of us could become the victim of shocking violations at any time. If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest nation in the world; but while that nation appears to be a comforting small town, in which we socialize with our selective group of friends, it and the rest of the Web is actually a lawless frontier of hidden and unpredictable dangers. The same power of information that can topple governments can destroy a persons career or marriage. As leading expert on social networks and privacy Lori Andrews shows, through groundbreaking in-depth research and a host of stunning stories of abuses, as we work and chat and shop and date (and even sometimes have sex) over the Web, we are opening ourselves up to increasingly intrusive, relentless, and anonymous surveillance—by employers, schools, lawyers, the police, and aggressive data aggregator services that compile an astonishing amount of information about us and sell it to any and all takers. She reveals the myriad ever more sophisticated techniques being used to track us and discloses how routinely colleges and employers reject applicants due to personal information searches; robbers use postings about vacations to target homes for break-ins; lawyers readily find information to use against us in divorce and child custody cases; and at one school, the administrators actually used the cameras on students school-provided laptops to spy on them in their homes. Some mobile Web devices are even being programmed to listen in on us and feed data services a steady stream of information about where we are and what we are doing. And even if we use the best services to get our personal data removed from the Web, in a short time almost all that data is restored. As Andrews persuasively argues, the legal system cannot be counted on to protect us—in the thousands of cases brought to trial by those whose rights have been violated, judges have most often ruled against them. That is why in addition to revealing the dangers and providing the best expert advice about protecting ourselves, Andrews proposes that we must all become supporters of a Constitution for the Web, which she has drafted and introduces in this book. Now is the time to join her and take action—the very future of privacy is at stake.

Review:

"'With more than 750 million members, Facebook's population would make it the third largest nation in the world.' Noted by the National Law Journal as one of the 100 Most Influential Lawyers in America, Andrews is concerned with the lawless frontiers of this figurative nation-how can social networks ensure freedom of speech while protecting the individual against anonymous threats, charges, and harassment? In order to defend 'the People of the Facebook/Twitter/Google/YouTube/MySpace Nation,' Andrews (Future Perfect) investigates the myriad ways in which social networking is unpoliced (or over-policed, in some cases), and proposes a constitution for the digital age. Up-to-date legal recourse for victims of cyberbullying is essentially nonexistent- Lori Drew, the mother of one of teenager Megan Meier's former friends, created a fake MySpace profile to harass Megan, who ended up killing herself. Due to the lack of applicable digital harassment laws, Drew's conviction was overturned and she was set free. On the other hand, students have been expelled for posting negative comments online about their schools, and one teacher was forced to resign due to a Facebook photo showing her drinking a beer. Andrews' 'The Social Network Constitution' echoes familiar amendments, such as 'The Right to Free Speech and Freedom of Expression,' but some are bespoke for the digital age, like 'The Right to Control One's Image.' This book will make readers rethink their online lives, and Andrews' Constitution is a great start to an important conversation. "
Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A leading specialist on social networks writes a shocking exposand#233; of the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web to protect us.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. Over a half a billion people are on Facebook alone. If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest nation in the world. But while that nation appears to be a comforting small town in which we can share photos of friends and quaint bits of trivia about our lives, it is actually a lawless battle zoneand#8212;a frontier with all the hidden and unpredictable dangers of any previously unexplored place. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt; Social networks offer freedom. An ordinary individual can be a reporter, alerting the world to breaking news of a natural disaster or a political crisis. A layperson can be a scientist, participating in a crowd-sourced research project. Or an investigator, helping cops solve a crime. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt; But as we work and chat and date (and sometimes even have sex) over the web, traditional rights may be slipping away. Colleges and employers routinely reject applicants because of information found on social networks. Cops use photos from peopleand#8217;s profiles to charge them with crimesand#8212;or argue for harsher sentences. Robbers use postings about vacations to figure out when to break into homes. At one school, officials used cameras on studentsand#8217; laptops to spy on them in their bedrooms.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt; The same power of information that can topple governments can also topple a personand#8217;s career, marriage, or future. What Andrews proposes is a Constitution for the web, to extend our rights to this wild new frontier. This vitally important book will generate a storm of attention.

Synopsis:

A shocking expose of how the web is being used to violate our basic individual rights.

About the Author

andlt;bandgt;Lori Andrewsandlt;/bandgt; is the director of the Institute for Science, Law, and Technology at Illinois Institute of Technology. She was named a and#8220;Newsmaker of the Yearand#8221; by the andlt;iandgt;American Bar Association Journalandlt;/iandgt;andnbsp;and has served as a regular advisor to the U.S. government on ethical issues regarding new technologies. Learn more at LoriAndrews.com.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781451650518
Subtitle:
Social Networks and the Death of Privacy
Author:
Andrews, Lori
Publisher:
Free Press
Subject:
Aspects
Subject:
General Political Science
Subject:
Science Reference-Technology
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20120110
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
index; notes
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Beginning and Reference
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » History and Society
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » General
Computers and Internet » Internet » Web » Social Networking
History and Social Science » Law » Privacy
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » General
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » New Arrivals
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Computer Science

I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Free Press - English 9781451650518 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'With more than 750 million members, Facebook's population would make it the third largest nation in the world.' Noted by the National Law Journal as one of the 100 Most Influential Lawyers in America, Andrews is concerned with the lawless frontiers of this figurative nation-how can social networks ensure freedom of speech while protecting the individual against anonymous threats, charges, and harassment? In order to defend 'the People of the Facebook/Twitter/Google/YouTube/MySpace Nation,' Andrews (Future Perfect) investigates the myriad ways in which social networking is unpoliced (or over-policed, in some cases), and proposes a constitution for the digital age. Up-to-date legal recourse for victims of cyberbullying is essentially nonexistent- Lori Drew, the mother of one of teenager Megan Meier's former friends, created a fake MySpace profile to harass Megan, who ended up killing herself. Due to the lack of applicable digital harassment laws, Drew's conviction was overturned and she was set free. On the other hand, students have been expelled for posting negative comments online about their schools, and one teacher was forced to resign due to a Facebook photo showing her drinking a beer. Andrews' 'The Social Network Constitution' echoes familiar amendments, such as 'The Right to Free Speech and Freedom of Expression,' but some are bespoke for the digital age, like 'The Right to Control One's Image.' This book will make readers rethink their online lives, and Andrews' Constitution is a great start to an important conversation. "
Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A leading specialist on social networks writes a shocking exposand#233; of the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web to protect us.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. Over a half a billion people are on Facebook alone. If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest nation in the world. But while that nation appears to be a comforting small town in which we can share photos of friends and quaint bits of trivia about our lives, it is actually a lawless battle zoneand#8212;a frontier with all the hidden and unpredictable dangers of any previously unexplored place. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt; Social networks offer freedom. An ordinary individual can be a reporter, alerting the world to breaking news of a natural disaster or a political crisis. A layperson can be a scientist, participating in a crowd-sourced research project. Or an investigator, helping cops solve a crime. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt; But as we work and chat and date (and sometimes even have sex) over the web, traditional rights may be slipping away. Colleges and employers routinely reject applicants because of information found on social networks. Cops use photos from peopleand#8217;s profiles to charge them with crimesand#8212;or argue for harsher sentences. Robbers use postings about vacations to figure out when to break into homes. At one school, officials used cameras on studentsand#8217; laptops to spy on them in their bedrooms.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt; The same power of information that can topple governments can also topple a personand#8217;s career, marriage, or future. What Andrews proposes is a Constitution for the web, to extend our rights to this wild new frontier. This vitally important book will generate a storm of attention.
"Synopsis" by , A shocking expose of how the web is being used to violate our basic individual rights.
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