Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | November 28, 2014

    Eleanor Catton: IMG Eleanor Catton: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$26.00
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Crafts- General

Homeward Bound: Why Women Are Embracing the New Domesticity

by

Homeward Bound: Why Women Are Embracing the New Domesticity Cover

ISBN13: 9781451665444
ISBN10: 145166544x
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $26.00!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Amid today’s rising anxieties — the economy, the scary state of the environment, the growing sense that the American Dream hasn’t turned out to be so dreamy after all — a groundswell of women (and more than a few men) are choosing to embrace an unusual rebellion: domesticity. A generation of smart, highly educated young people are spending their time knitting, canning jam, baking cupcakes, gardening, and more (and blogging about it, of course), embracing the labor-intensive domestic tasks their mothers and grandmothers eagerly shrugged off. Some are even turning away from traditional careers and corporate culture for slower, more home-centric lifestyles that involve “urban homesteading,” homeschooling their kids, or starting Etsy businesses. They’re questioning whether regular jobs are truly fulfilling and whether it’s okay to turn away from the ambitions of their parents’ generation.

How did this happen? And what does it all mean? What happens to American culture as a whole when our best and brightest put home and hearth above other concerns? Does this sudden fascination with traditional homemaking bode ill for gender equality? What role have the media and blog culture played in making domesticity look so darn appealing?

In Homeward Bound, acclaimed journalist Emily Matchar takes a long, hard look at both the inspiring appeal and the potential dangers of this trend she calls the New Domesticity, exploring how it could be reshaping the role of women in society and what the consequences may be for all of us. In riveting interviews with all kinds of people from coast to coast, Matchar examines the motivations of those who have embraced this movement, from Southern food bloggers to chicken-keeping “radical homemakers” on the East Coast to Etsy entrepreneurs in Provo, Utah, to attachment parenting devotees in Chicago, and many more. This groundbreaking reporting on the New Domesticity is guaranteed to transform our notions of women in today’s society and add a new layer to the ongoing discussion of whether women can — or should — have it all.

Review:

“This book heralds a revolution in the attitudes and values of our society and will certainly divide public opinion in general and women in particular.” Elisabeth Badinter, bestselling author of The Conflict: How Modern Motherhood Undermines the Status of Women

Review:

"Matchar maintains a chatty tone that makes for easy reading....She's funny and self-deprecating....[Her] work left me with a better understanding of other women's motivations." Washington Post

Review:

"The brilliance of Emily Matchar's new book is that it exhaustively describes what disillusioned workers are opting into: a slower, more sustainable, and more self-sufficient lifestyle that's focused on the home. Matchar synthesizes dozens of trend stories...into a single, compelling narrative about the resurgence of domesticity....Refreshing" The New Republic

Review:

"Matchar captures the appeal of the new domesticity — from its 'cozy vintage aesthetic' to its embrace of healthier foods and recycling. At the same time, she raises sharp and timely questions about whether the army of new-style happy homemakers aren't 'glossing over some of the harder realities of women, work, and equality.'" Boston Globe

Review:

"Cogently argues that choosing a more hands-on, DIY lifestyle family farming, canning, crafting-can, without sacrificing feminism's hard-won gains, improve on an earlier time when 'people lived more lightly on the earth and relied less on corporations, and family and community came first.'" Elle

Review:

"An entertaining and well-structured book." New York Journal of Books

Review:

"A well-researched look at the resurgence of home life....Offers intriguing insight into the renaissance of old-fashioned home traditions." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"A lively and perceptive reporter...[Matchar] offers a valuable and astute assessment of the factors that led to the current embracing of domesticity and the consequences of this movement." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"[Matchar] places women at the center of the budding movement to challenge industrial food....A nuanced, sympathetic critique...she defends feminism against the charge that it drove women out of the kitchen and led to the decline in cooking." MotherJones.com

Synopsis:

What happens to our society as a whole when smart, high-achieving young women are honing their traditional homemaking skills? Emily Matchar offers a smart investigation into this return to domesticity.

There's no doubt about it: domesticity is enjoying a major comeback, with the explosion of “stitch n’ bitch” knitting circles; our sudden fascination with canning, cheese-making, and grinding our own flour; and a tidal wave of memoirs in the “I quit my corporate job and found fulfillment on a Vermont goat farm” vein. Why are women embracing the labor-intense domestic tasks that our mothers and grandmothers so eagerly shrugged off? Why has the image of the blissfully domestic, vintage-clad supermom become the media’s feminine ideal?

In Homeward Bound, Emily Matchar offers an investigation into how New Domesticity is fundamentally reshaping the role of women in society, and what the consequences might be. With research spanning from coast to coast, Matchar introduces us to a diverse cast of characters — Southern food bloggers, “radical homemakers” on the East Coast, Etsy entrepreneurs in Provo, members of urban knitting circles in Austin, and many more. She identifies the negative elements of these trends along with the positive, ultimately suggesting that this return to domesticity goes a step too far, to the detriment of both men and women alike.

About the Author

Emily Matchar writes about culture, women's issues, work, food and more for places such as The Atlantic, The Washington Post, Salon, The Hairpin, Gourmet, Men's Journal, Outside, and many others. She lives in Hong Kong and Chapel Hill, North Carolina, with her husband.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 9 comments:

jessicaadamoclark, October 14, 2013 (view all comments by jessicaadamoclark)
Interesting and thought provoking at points. I especially appreciated the author connecting the DIY movement's focus on individualism and how this can negatively impact society's push to ensure that services and goods are available to all members, not just the privileged middle and upper classes. I would have liked for the book to discuss DIY culture in working class and underserved communities and how it may differ from the traditional image of the DIY community. I appreciate how this book made me take a look at my own ideas and beliefs that have been shaped by the DIY, blogging, homesteading, etc community. I definitely won't feel so guilty or lacking next time I'm looking at someone's blog about their fabulous homemade farm life.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
mybodymyself, June 20, 2013 (view all comments by mybodymyself)
Back with my final observations regarding this particular book and especially its author. At the same time I'm officially done reading it and etc.

Found that it was indeed worth the read, but not necessary buy. Basically, that it all of it appears to be what I found earlier regarding it being more repetitive and generalization. Especially, compared to all of the books and their authors out there lately regarding these particular subjects and etc. Also, found that the author and including her partner are more self centered as opposed to being not. In which I would love to have found how her partner was bought up and etc. Because to me its just as important as hers was and etc.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
mybodymyself, June 19, 2013 (view all comments by mybodymyself)
Back with one more observation regarding this particular and especially its author. At the same time I'm still in the process of reading it. In which I'm almost done reading it.

Found shes doesn't even bothering mentioning that Mothering Magazine ceased their publication after 35 years of it, 2011. At the same time their website and web commune are still there. While she was in the process of researching and writing this book.

Think thats it and hopefully will not be back again with more.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 9 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781451665444
Subtitle:
Why Women Are Embracing the New Domesticity
Author:
Matchar, Emily
Author:
Emily Matchar
Author:
Emily Matchar
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Subject:
Sociology - Marriage & Family
Subject:
Feminist Studies-General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20130507
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. How to Grow More Vegetables, 8th... New Trade Paper $19.99

Related Subjects

Engineering » Home Construction » Sustainable Living
Featured Titles » General
History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » General
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Crafts » General

Homeward Bound: Why Women Are Embracing the New Domesticity New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$26.00 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781451665444 Reviews:
"Review" by , “This book heralds a revolution in the attitudes and values of our society and will certainly divide public opinion in general and women in particular.” Elisabeth Badinter, bestselling author of The Conflict: How Modern Motherhood Undermines the Status of Women
"Review" by , "Matchar maintains a chatty tone that makes for easy reading....She's funny and self-deprecating....[Her] work left me with a better understanding of other women's motivations."
"Review" by , "The brilliance of Emily Matchar's new book is that it exhaustively describes what disillusioned workers are opting into: a slower, more sustainable, and more self-sufficient lifestyle that's focused on the home. Matchar synthesizes dozens of trend stories...into a single, compelling narrative about the resurgence of domesticity....Refreshing"
"Review" by , "Matchar captures the appeal of the new domesticity — from its 'cozy vintage aesthetic' to its embrace of healthier foods and recycling. At the same time, she raises sharp and timely questions about whether the army of new-style happy homemakers aren't 'glossing over some of the harder realities of women, work, and equality.'"
"Review" by , "Cogently argues that choosing a more hands-on, DIY lifestyle family farming, canning, crafting-can, without sacrificing feminism's hard-won gains, improve on an earlier time when 'people lived more lightly on the earth and relied less on corporations, and family and community came first.'"
"Review" by , "An entertaining and well-structured book."
"Review" by , "A well-researched look at the resurgence of home life....Offers intriguing insight into the renaissance of old-fashioned home traditions."
"Review" by , "A lively and perceptive reporter...[Matchar] offers a valuable and astute assessment of the factors that led to the current embracing of domesticity and the consequences of this movement."
"Review" by , "[Matchar] places women at the center of the budding movement to challenge industrial food....A nuanced, sympathetic critique...she defends feminism against the charge that it drove women out of the kitchen and led to the decline in cooking."
"Synopsis" by , What happens to our society as a whole when smart, high-achieving young women are honing their traditional homemaking skills? Emily Matchar offers a smart investigation into this return to domesticity.

There's no doubt about it: domesticity is enjoying a major comeback, with the explosion of “stitch n’ bitch” knitting circles; our sudden fascination with canning, cheese-making, and grinding our own flour; and a tidal wave of memoirs in the “I quit my corporate job and found fulfillment on a Vermont goat farm” vein. Why are women embracing the labor-intense domestic tasks that our mothers and grandmothers so eagerly shrugged off? Why has the image of the blissfully domestic, vintage-clad supermom become the media’s feminine ideal?

In Homeward Bound, Emily Matchar offers an investigation into how New Domesticity is fundamentally reshaping the role of women in society, and what the consequences might be. With research spanning from coast to coast, Matchar introduces us to a diverse cast of characters — Southern food bloggers, “radical homemakers” on the East Coast, Etsy entrepreneurs in Provo, members of urban knitting circles in Austin, and many more. She identifies the negative elements of these trends along with the positive, ultimately suggesting that this return to domesticity goes a step too far, to the detriment of both men and women alike.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.