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The World We Used to Live in: Remembering the Powers of the Medicine Men

by

The World We Used to Live in: Remembering the Powers of the Medicine Men Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of the unfortunate byproducts of the recent renaissance in Native American spirituality has been the abuse and misuse of sacred ceremonies by Indians and non- Indians alike. In Vine Deloria's Jr.'s groundbreaking final work, the culmination of more than 30 years of research and scholarship, this great and beloved thinker reclaims the importance of these ceremonies for Native America. Through the collection of dozens of stories about medicine men, across tribes and time, Deloria displays the sense of humility, the reliance on spirits, and the immense powers that characterized Native people through history. Moreover, in a synthesis of many of his earlier writings, Deloria explores the relation of these powers to our current understanding of science and the cosmos.

Book News Annotation:

In this last book by Deloria (d. 2005), a leading Native American scholar/philosopher seeks a corrective to the erosion of genuine spirituality among today's generation of Native Americans. He introduces collected stories of the powers and rituals of traditional medicine men and women in light of modern science. These tales e.g., of healing, changing the weather, and inter-species communication, were related by Native people and some white observers. The book is not illustrated or indexed. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

In his final work, the great and beloved Native American scholar Vine Deloria Jr. takes us into the relam of the spritual and reveals through eyewitness accounts the immense power of medicine men. The World We Used to Live In, a fascinating collection of anecdotes from tribes across the country, explores everything from healing miracles and sacred rituals to Navajos who could move the sun. In this compelling work, which draws upon a lifetime of scholarship, Deloria shows us how ancient powers fit into our modern understanding of science and the cosmos, and how future generations may draw strength from the old ways.

Synopsis:

Deloria looks at medicine men, their powers, and the Earth's relation to the cosmos.

Synopsis:

Deloria looks at medicine men, their powers, and the Earth's relation to the cosmos.

About the Author

Vine Deloria Jr., was a leading Native American scholar, whose research, writings, and teaching have encompassed history, law, religious studies, and political science. He is the former executive director of the National Congress of American Indians.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781555915643
Subtitle:
Remembering the Powers of the Medicine Men
Author:
Deloria, Vine
Author:
Deloria Jr., Vine
Author:
Vine Deloria, Jr.
Author:
Deloria, Vine, Jr.
Author:
ria, Jr., Vine
Author:
Deloria, Vine, Jr.
Author:
Delo
Publisher:
Fulcrum Publishing
Subject:
Medicine
Subject:
Indians of north america
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Native American Studies
Subject:
Native American Studies
Subject:
Shamanism
Subject:
Indians of North America -- Religion.
Subject:
Native American-General Native American Studies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20060306
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9.1 x 6.1 x 0.8 in 14 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

The World We Used to Live in: Remembering the Powers of the Medicine Men New Trade Paper
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Product details 272 pages Fulcrum Publishing - English 9781555915643 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In his final work, the great and beloved Native American scholar Vine Deloria Jr. takes us into the relam of the spritual and reveals through eyewitness accounts the immense power of medicine men. The World We Used to Live In, a fascinating collection of anecdotes from tribes across the country, explores everything from healing miracles and sacred rituals to Navajos who could move the sun. In this compelling work, which draws upon a lifetime of scholarship, Deloria shows us how ancient powers fit into our modern understanding of science and the cosmos, and how future generations may draw strength from the old ways.
"Synopsis" by ,
Deloria looks at medicine men, their powers, and the Earth's relation to the cosmos.
"Synopsis" by ,
Deloria looks at medicine men, their powers, and the Earth's relation to the cosmos.
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