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1 Burnside POET- A- Z910 [A] to 906 [Z]

In the Next Galaxy

by

In the Next Galaxy Cover

 

Awards

Winner of the 2002 National Book Award for Poetry

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

At eighty-six, National Book Critics Circle Award winnder Ruth Stone is considered "Mother Poet" to many contemporary writers. In this, her eighth volume, she continues her long practice of piercing directly to life's poetic truth. She writes with a crackling intelligence, interrogating history from the vantage point of an aging and impoverished woman. Wise, sardonic, crafty, and misleadingly simple, Stone loves heavy themes but not heavy poems.

Review:

"As Ruth Stone grows older, her poems turn devastating without abandoning the absolute resolution she learned back in the 1950's." Harvard Review

Review:

"Ruth Stone's work is alternately witty, bawdy, touching, and profound....Her honesty and originality give her writing a sense of youth and newness because she looks at the world so clearly....Her writing proves to be simply inspired." USA Today

Review:

"A Ruth Stone poem feels alive in the hands — ardent, independent, restless....She sometimes has the sound of a prophet." Sharon Olds

Review:

"Ruth Stone began late, achieving her most powerful works with maturity and continuing their scope and span into age where most poets fall into silence or repetition." Drunken Boat

Synopsis:

Exquisite new work from winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Synopsis:

Poetry. Ruth Stone has rightly been called America's Akhmatova, and she is considered "Mother Poet" to many contemporary writers. In this, her eighth volume, she writes with crackling intelligence, interrogating history from the vantage point of an aging and impoverished woman. Wise, sardonic, crafty, and misleadingly simple, Stone loves heavy themes but loathes heavy poems. "Ruth Stone's work is alternatively witty, bawdy, touching, and profound. But never pompous. Her honesty and originality give her writing a sense of youth and newness because she looks at the world so clearly, without all the detritus of social convention the rest of us pick up along the way . . . Her writing proves her to be simply inspired"-USA Today.

Synopsis:

Ruth Stone has rightly been called America’s Akhmatova, and she is considered "Mother Poet" to many contemporary writers. In this, her eighth volume, she writes with crackling intelligence, interrogating history from the vantage point of an aging and impoverished woman. Wise, sardonic, crafty, and misleadingly simple, Stone loves heavy themes but loathes heavy poems.

Shapes

In the longer view it doesn’t matter.

However, it’s that having lived, it matters.

So that every death breaks you apart.

You find yourself weeping at the door

of your own kitchen, overwhelmed

by loss. And you find yourself weeping

as you pass the homeless person

head in hands resigned on a cement

step, the wire basket on wheels right there.

Like stopped film, or a line of Vallejo,

or a sketch of the mechanics of a wing

by Leonardo. All pauses in space,

a violent compression of meaning

in an instant within the meaningless.

Even staring into the dim shapes

at the farthest edge; accepting that blur.

"Ruth Stone’s work is alternately witty, bawdy, touching, and profound. But never pompous. Her honesty and originality give her writing a sense of youth and newness because she looks at the world so clearly, without all the detritus of social convention the rest of us pick up along the way… Her writing proves her to be simply inspired."—USA Today

Ruth Stone was born in Virginia in 1915. She is author of eight books of poems and recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 1959, after her husband committed suicide, she was forced to raise three daughters alone. For twenty years she traveled the US, teaching creative writing at many universities, finally settling at SUNY Binghamton. She lives in Vermont.

About the Author

Ruth Stone was born in Virginia in 1915. She is author of eight books of poems and recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 1959, after her husband committed suicide, she was forced to raise three daughters alone. For twenty years she traveled the US, teaching creative writing at many universities, finally settling at SUNY Birghamton. She lives in Vermont.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781556591785
Author:
Stone, Ruth
Publisher:
Copper Canyon Press
Location:
Port Townsend, Wash.
Subject:
American
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Poetry
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Subject:
Single Author / American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series Volume:
1625-C
Publication Date:
20020531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
110
Dimensions:
9.3 x 6.2 x 0.5 in 11 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

In the Next Galaxy Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.50 In Stock
Product details 110 pages Copper Canyon Press - English 9781556591785 Reviews:
"Review" by , "As Ruth Stone grows older, her poems turn devastating without abandoning the absolute resolution she learned back in the 1950's."
"Review" by , "Ruth Stone's work is alternately witty, bawdy, touching, and profound....Her honesty and originality give her writing a sense of youth and newness because she looks at the world so clearly....Her writing proves to be simply inspired."
"Review" by , "A Ruth Stone poem feels alive in the hands — ardent, independent, restless....She sometimes has the sound of a prophet."
"Review" by , "Ruth Stone began late, achieving her most powerful works with maturity and continuing their scope and span into age where most poets fall into silence or repetition."
"Synopsis" by ,
Exquisite new work from winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.
"Synopsis" by , Poetry. Ruth Stone has rightly been called America's Akhmatova, and she is considered "Mother Poet" to many contemporary writers. In this, her eighth volume, she writes with crackling intelligence, interrogating history from the vantage point of an aging and impoverished woman. Wise, sardonic, crafty, and misleadingly simple, Stone loves heavy themes but loathes heavy poems. "Ruth Stone's work is alternatively witty, bawdy, touching, and profound. But never pompous. Her honesty and originality give her writing a sense of youth and newness because she looks at the world so clearly, without all the detritus of social convention the rest of us pick up along the way . . . Her writing proves her to be simply inspired"-USA Today.
"Synopsis" by ,

Ruth Stone has rightly been called America’s Akhmatova, and she is considered "Mother Poet" to many contemporary writers. In this, her eighth volume, she writes with crackling intelligence, interrogating history from the vantage point of an aging and impoverished woman. Wise, sardonic, crafty, and misleadingly simple, Stone loves heavy themes but loathes heavy poems.

Shapes

In the longer view it doesn’t matter.

However, it’s that having lived, it matters.

So that every death breaks you apart.

You find yourself weeping at the door

of your own kitchen, overwhelmed

by loss. And you find yourself weeping

as you pass the homeless person

head in hands resigned on a cement

step, the wire basket on wheels right there.

Like stopped film, or a line of Vallejo,

or a sketch of the mechanics of a wing

by Leonardo. All pauses in space,

a violent compression of meaning

in an instant within the meaningless.

Even staring into the dim shapes

at the farthest edge; accepting that blur.

"Ruth Stone’s work is alternately witty, bawdy, touching, and profound. But never pompous. Her honesty and originality give her writing a sense of youth and newness because she looks at the world so clearly, without all the detritus of social convention the rest of us pick up along the way… Her writing proves her to be simply inspired."—USA Today

Ruth Stone was born in Virginia in 1915. She is author of eight books of poems and recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 1959, after her husband committed suicide, she was forced to raise three daughters alone. For twenty years she traveled the US, teaching creative writing at many universities, finally settling at SUNY Binghamton. She lives in Vermont.

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