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2 Beaverton Poetry- A to Z

The End of the West

by

The End of the West Cover

ISBN13: 9781556592898
ISBN10: 1556592892
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Dickman's book moves with careful intensity as it confidently illuminates buried, contemporary suffering."—Publishers Weekly

"Elizabeth Bishop said that the three qualities she admired most in poetry were accuracy, spontaneity, and mystery. Michael Dickman's first full-length collection of poems demonstrates each brilliantly....These are lithe, seemingly effortless poems, poems whose strange affective power remains even after several readings. Again and again the language seems to disappear, leaving the reader with woven flashes of image, situation, emotion....These are durable poems from one of the most accomplished and original poets to emerge in years."—The Believer

"With vacant space and verbal economy, his work suggests volumes." —Poets & Writers

The poems in Michael Dickman’s energized debut document the bright desires and all-too-common sufferings of modern times: the churn of domestic violence, spiritual longing, drug abuse, and the impossible expectations fathers have for their sons. In a poem that references heroin and “scary parents,” Dickman reminds us that “Still there is a lot to pray to on earth.” Dickman is a poet to watch.

You can go blind, waiting

Unbelievable quiet

except for their

soundings

Moving the sea around

Unbelievable quiet inside you, as they change

the face of water

The only other time I felt this still was watching Leif shoot up when we were twelve

Sunlight all over his face

breaking

the surface of something

I couldn’t see

You can wait your

whole life

Michael Dickman was born and raised in Portland, Oregon, and began writing poems “after accidentally reading a Neruda ode.” His work has appeared in The New Yorker, Tin House, and The American Poetry Review.

Review:

"Some form of light — sunlight, moonlight, starlight, streetlight — appears in every one of the 18 poems in Dickman's debut. Slight and spare, the poems' frequent recurring themes accumulate beneficially, linking all the individual poems into one, more substantial, piece. Nothing grand takes place in these poems, but the quietness of the language and the creeping, sinister subject matter (heroin addiction, abusive fathers) make this highly anticipated book captivating and very readable, 'a nice description of something beautiful that doesn't exist anymore,' as Dickman writes. Elsewhere, he grimly recalls, 'No one I loved had died for almost two years // Then Amy bled out / in a bathtub.' As one half of the Dickman twins (both are actors, and the other, Matthew, also recently published his first poetry collection), Michael has received the kind of advance publicity rare for a new poet. Profiles in both Poets and Writers and the New Yorker as well as publication during National Poetry Month should ensure a larger than usual audience. And the attention is not undeserved; Dickman's book moves with careful intensity as it confidently illuminates buried, contemporary suffering: 'My little sister, tied to her trundle bed, crying, forced to eat slices of orange/ she believed were her goldfish.'" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Profiled in The New Yorker, this debut marks a talent to watch for years to come.

Synopsis:

Poetry. The poems in Michael Dickman's energized debut document the bright desires and all-too-common sufferings of modern times: the churn of domestic violence, spiritual longing, drug abuse, and the impossible expectations fathers have for their sons. In a poem that references heroin and "scary parents," Dickman reminds us that "Still there is a lot to pray to on earth." Dickman is a poet to watch.

Synopsis:

“The rising poetry stars? Well, you know there was someone we published just the other day [in The New Yorker] whose work I really like. Michael Dickman his name is. . . . Nothing makes me happier than the thought that there is going to be somebody coming down the road who is going to be scintillating.”—Paul Muldoon, The New Yorker

The poems in Michael Dickman’s energized debut document the bright desires and all-too-common sufferings of modern times: the churn of domestic violence, spiritual longing, drug abuse, and the impossible expectations fathers have for their sons. In a poem that references heroin and “scary parents,” Dickman reminds us that “Still there is a lot to pray to on earth.” Dickman is a poet to watch.

You can go blind, waiting

Unbelievable quiet
except for their
soundings

Moving the sea around

Unbelievable quiet inside you, as they change
the face of water

The only other time I felt this still was watching Leif shoot up when we were twelve

Sunlight all over his face

breaking
the surface of something
I couldn’t see

You can wait your
whole life

Michael Dickmanwas born and raised in Portland, Oregon, and began writing poems “after accidentally reading a Neruda ode.” His work has appeared in The New Yorker, Tin House, and The American Poetry Review.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

radfemme, January 13, 2011 (view all comments by radfemme)
Against my will, I'm a real stickler for how a poem looks on a page-at least at first sight-but once I let go of my distaste for the ample spacing, I really enjoyed his collection. It's deep and beautiful and there's a lot to ponder in his poems. Like his brother (pardon the comparison), you'll find young male sexuality, working class childhood, and tragedies of drug abuse that might turn you on, make you grateful, and keep you humble.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781556592898
Author:
Dickman, Michael
Publisher:
Copper Canyon Press
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
Poetry
Subject:
Single Author / American
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Lannan Literary Selections
Publication Date:
20090431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
96
Dimensions:
8.5 x 6.1 x 0.4 in 5.5 oz

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

The End of the West Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.93 In Stock
Product details 96 pages Copper Canyon Press - English 9781556592898 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Some form of light — sunlight, moonlight, starlight, streetlight — appears in every one of the 18 poems in Dickman's debut. Slight and spare, the poems' frequent recurring themes accumulate beneficially, linking all the individual poems into one, more substantial, piece. Nothing grand takes place in these poems, but the quietness of the language and the creeping, sinister subject matter (heroin addiction, abusive fathers) make this highly anticipated book captivating and very readable, 'a nice description of something beautiful that doesn't exist anymore,' as Dickman writes. Elsewhere, he grimly recalls, 'No one I loved had died for almost two years // Then Amy bled out / in a bathtub.' As one half of the Dickman twins (both are actors, and the other, Matthew, also recently published his first poetry collection), Michael has received the kind of advance publicity rare for a new poet. Profiles in both Poets and Writers and the New Yorker as well as publication during National Poetry Month should ensure a larger than usual audience. And the attention is not undeserved; Dickman's book moves with careful intensity as it confidently illuminates buried, contemporary suffering: 'My little sister, tied to her trundle bed, crying, forced to eat slices of orange/ she believed were her goldfish.'" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
Profiled in The New Yorker, this debut marks a talent to watch for years to come.
"Synopsis" by , Poetry. The poems in Michael Dickman's energized debut document the bright desires and all-too-common sufferings of modern times: the churn of domestic violence, spiritual longing, drug abuse, and the impossible expectations fathers have for their sons. In a poem that references heroin and "scary parents," Dickman reminds us that "Still there is a lot to pray to on earth." Dickman is a poet to watch.
"Synopsis" by , “The rising poetry stars? Well, you know there was someone we published just the other day [in The New Yorker] whose work I really like. Michael Dickman his name is. . . . Nothing makes me happier than the thought that there is going to be somebody coming down the road who is going to be scintillating.”—Paul Muldoon, The New Yorker

The poems in Michael Dickman’s energized debut document the bright desires and all-too-common sufferings of modern times: the churn of domestic violence, spiritual longing, drug abuse, and the impossible expectations fathers have for their sons. In a poem that references heroin and “scary parents,” Dickman reminds us that “Still there is a lot to pray to on earth.” Dickman is a poet to watch.

You can go blind, waiting

Unbelievable quiet
except for their
soundings

Moving the sea around

Unbelievable quiet inside you, as they change
the face of water

The only other time I felt this still was watching Leif shoot up when we were twelve

Sunlight all over his face

breaking
the surface of something
I couldn’t see

You can wait your
whole life

Michael Dickmanwas born and raised in Portland, Oregon, and began writing poems “after accidentally reading a Neruda ode.” His work has appeared in The New Yorker, Tin House, and The American Poetry Review.

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