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Songs of Unreason

Songs of Unreason Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

#1 Poetry Foundation Bestseller

Michigan Notable Book

"A beautifully mysterious inquiry... Here Harrison—forthright, testy, funny, and profoundly discerning—a gruff romantic and a sage realist, tells tales about himself, from his dangerous obsession with Federico Garcia Lorca to how he touched a bears head, reflects on his dance with the trickster age, and shares magnetizing visions of dogs, horses, birds, and rivers. Oscillating between drenching experience and intellectual musings, Harrison celebrates movement as the pulse of life, and art, which scrubs the soul fresh." Booklist

"Harrison has written a nearly pitch-perfect book of poems, shining with the elemental force of Neruda's Odes or Matisse's paper cutouts....In Songs of Unreason,, his finest book of verse, Harrison has stripped his voice to the bare essentials--to what must be said, and only what must be said." The Wichita Eagle

"Songs of Unreason, Harrison's latest collection of poetry, is a wonderful defense of the possibilities of living. His are hard won lines, but never bitter, just broken in and thankful for the chance to have seen it all."The Industrial Worker Book Review

"Unlike many contemporary poets, Harrison is philosophical, but his philosophy is nature-based and idiosyncratic: "Much that you see/ isn't with your eyes./ Throughout the body are eyes." As in all good poetry, Harrison's lines linger to be ruminated upon a third or fourth time, with each new reading revealing more substance and raising more questions." Library Journal

"It wouldnt be a Harrison collection without the poet, novelist, and food critics reverence for rivers, dogs, and women...his poems stun us simply, with the richness of the clarity, detail, and the immediacy of Harrison's voice." Publishers Weekly

Jim Harrison's compelling and provocative Songs of Unreason explores what it means to inhabit the world in atavistic, primitive, and totemistic ways. "This can be disturbing to the learned," Harrison admits. Using interconnected suites, brief lyrics, and rollicking narratives, Harrison's passions and concerns—creeks, thickets, time's effervescence, familial love—emerge by turns painful and celebratory, localized and exiled.

Review:

"It wouldn't be a Harrison collection without the poet, novelist, and food critic's reverence for rivers, dogs, and women, but that's not to say Harrison has grown stale or uninteresting in his late poems. Often, as in 'A Part of My History,' which finds the poet tracking the ghost of Garcia Lorca through Granada, his poems stun us simply, with the richness of the clarity, detail, and the immediacy of Harrison's voice. 'We visited the site of the murder, drank a little wine,' he writes, 'and I stared at the Sierra Nevada/ glistening with snow that was somehow somber as/ the jewelry of the dead.' Pushing his formal boundaries, Harrison closes the collection with the meditative 'Suite of Unreason,' a piece that boils down his sharp, epigrammatic lines into a sequence of fist-pumping short poems. But it also wouldn't be a Harrison poem without the hard melancholy that has come to define his voice. The beauty of Harrison's suite is that it allows the same voice that tells us 'I will sing even with my tongue sliced/ into a fork' to tell us that 'the sun forgot to rise/ and for a while no one noticed/ except a few farmers, who shot themselves.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

One of America's leading novelists and poets, "Jim Harrison is a writer with immortality in him."-The Sunday Times

Synopsis:

"His poems succeed on the basis of an open heart and a still-ravenous appetite for life."The Texas Observer

"The great American writer is at it again, his voice as clear, bighearted and caustic as ever."Star Tribune

Jim Harrison's compelling and provocative Songs of Unreason explores what it means to inhabit the world in atavistic, primitive, and totemistic ways. "This can be disturbing to the learned," Harrison admits. Using interconnected suites, brief lyrics, and rollicking narratives, Harrison's passions and concerns—creeks, thickets, time's effervescence, familial love—emerge by turns painful and celebratory, localized and exiled.

From "Broom":

To remember that you're alive

visit the cemetery of your father

at noon after you've made love

and are still wrapped in a mammalian

odor that you are forced to cherish.

Under each stone is someone's inevitable

surprise, the unexpected death

of their biology that struggled hard as it must.

Now go home without looking back

at the fading cemetery, enough is enough,

but stop on the way to buy the best wine

you can afford and a dozen stiff brooms.

Have a few swallows then throw the furniture

out the window and then begin sweeping . . .

Jim Harrison, one of America's most versatile and celebrated writers, is the author of over thirty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction—including Legends of the Fall, Dalva, and The Shape of the Journey. He divides his time between Montana and Arizona.

About the Author

Jim Harrison: Jim Harrison, one of Americas most versatile and celebrated writers, is the author of over thirty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction—including Legends of the Fall, the acclaimed trilogy of novellas, and The Shape of the Journey: New and Collected Poems. His books have been translated into two dozen languages, and in 2007 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. With a fondness for open space and anonymous thickets, he divides his time between Montana and southern Arizona.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781556593895
Publisher:
Copper Canyon Press
Subject:
Single Author / American
Author:
Harrison, Jim
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20111131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
120
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

» Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
» Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » Featured Titles

Songs of Unreason
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 120 pages Copper Canyon Press - English 9781556593895 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "It wouldn't be a Harrison collection without the poet, novelist, and food critic's reverence for rivers, dogs, and women, but that's not to say Harrison has grown stale or uninteresting in his late poems. Often, as in 'A Part of My History,' which finds the poet tracking the ghost of Garcia Lorca through Granada, his poems stun us simply, with the richness of the clarity, detail, and the immediacy of Harrison's voice. 'We visited the site of the murder, drank a little wine,' he writes, 'and I stared at the Sierra Nevada/ glistening with snow that was somehow somber as/ the jewelry of the dead.' Pushing his formal boundaries, Harrison closes the collection with the meditative 'Suite of Unreason,' a piece that boils down his sharp, epigrammatic lines into a sequence of fist-pumping short poems. But it also wouldn't be a Harrison poem without the hard melancholy that has come to define his voice. The beauty of Harrison's suite is that it allows the same voice that tells us 'I will sing even with my tongue sliced/ into a fork' to tell us that 'the sun forgot to rise/ and for a while no one noticed/ except a few farmers, who shot themselves.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , One of America's leading novelists and poets, "Jim Harrison is a writer with immortality in him."-The Sunday Times
"Synopsis" by ,

"His poems succeed on the basis of an open heart and a still-ravenous appetite for life."The Texas Observer

"The great American writer is at it again, his voice as clear, bighearted and caustic as ever."Star Tribune

Jim Harrison's compelling and provocative Songs of Unreason explores what it means to inhabit the world in atavistic, primitive, and totemistic ways. "This can be disturbing to the learned," Harrison admits. Using interconnected suites, brief lyrics, and rollicking narratives, Harrison's passions and concerns—creeks, thickets, time's effervescence, familial love—emerge by turns painful and celebratory, localized and exiled.

From "Broom":

To remember that you're alive

visit the cemetery of your father

at noon after you've made love

and are still wrapped in a mammalian

odor that you are forced to cherish.

Under each stone is someone's inevitable

surprise, the unexpected death

of their biology that struggled hard as it must.

Now go home without looking back

at the fading cemetery, enough is enough,

but stop on the way to buy the best wine

you can afford and a dozen stiff brooms.

Have a few swallows then throw the furniture

out the window and then begin sweeping . . .

Jim Harrison, one of America's most versatile and celebrated writers, is the author of over thirty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction—including Legends of the Fall, Dalva, and The Shape of the Journey. He divides his time between Montana and Arizona.

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