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The Love Children

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The Love Children Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Marilyn French's 1977 novel The Women's Room epitomized the feminist movement and became one of the most influential books of our time. Now she has captured the complexities of life for the daughters of The Women's Room generation in her highly anticipated new novel The Love Children.

It is the late 1960s in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Grateful Dead is playing on the radio and teenagers are wearing long hair and blue jeans. Jess Leighton, the daughter of a temperamental painter and a proto-feminist Harvard professor, is struggling to make sense of her world amid racial tensions, Vietnam War protests, and anti-government rage.

With more options than her mother's generation, but no role model for creating the life she desires, Jess experiments with sex and psychedelic drugs as she searches for happiness on her own terms. In the midst of joining and fleeing a commune, growing organic vegetables, and operating a sustainable restaurant, Jess grapples with the legacy of her mother's generation.

Review:

"Marilyn French's The Women's Room, published in 1977, spoke to a generation. In this final novel, published posthumously, French uses the social unrest of the late 1960s as the seedbed for modern dissatisfaction. Jess Leighton navigates her parents' divorce, the Vietnam War, racism and her burgeoning sexuality with difficulty. She plunges into sex, drugs, bad relationships and life on a commune growing organic vegetables, something she had never imagined back in high school in Cambridge, Mass. A novel that feels like a memoir, there are many beautiful passages and poignant moments, but French tries to cover too much and tells more than she shows. When she pulls back the curtain on specific, life-changing moments in Jess's life, the writing is strong and the investment in the characters deep, which makes the weaker sections all the more frustrating. French's disciples will laud this as a life-affirming work; her critics will dismiss it; but it's too complex and nuanced a novel to be banished into either camp. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A novel that feels like memoir, there are many beautiful passages and poignant moments. . . " Publishers Weekly

Review:

"French's meticulous and affecting tale of the forging of one woman’s conscience encompasses thoughtful portraits of 'love children', from peace activists to members of unconventional families, and a forthright critique of the counterculture that puts today's wars, struggles for equality, and environmental troubles into sharp perspective." Booklist

Synopsis:

How the daughters of The Women's Room generation make lives of their own.

Synopsis:

Fiction. It is the late 1960s in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Grateful Dead is playing on the radio and teenagers are wearing long hair and blue jeans. Jess Leighton, the daughter of a temperamental painter and a proto-feminist Harvard professor, is struggling to make sense of her world amid racial tensions, Vietnam War protests, and anti-government rage. With more options than her mother's generation, but no role model for creating the life she desires, Jess experiments with sex and psychedelic drugs as she searches for happiness on her own terms. In the midst of joining and fleeing a commune, growing organic vegetables, and operating a sustainable restaurant, Jess grapples with the legacy of her mother's generation.

About the Author

Marilyn French's views have always been unapologetically radical. Her work stresses that women's suppression is an integral function of the male-dominated global culture, both on the domestic and international front. She is best known for her first novel, the 21-million-copy bestseller The Women's Room, which is considered one of the most influential works of the modern feminist movement, and, more recently, its sequel, In the Name of Friendship. She spent fifteen years researching and writing her immensely readable four volume women's history series FROM EVE TO DAWN: A HISTORY OF WOMEN IN THE WORLD. Her other nonfiction works include Beyond Power: On Women Men, and Morals, The War against Women, and her memoir on her battle with esophageal cancer, A Season in Hell. She died in May 2009.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781558616066
Author:
French, Marilyn
Publisher:
Feminist Press
Subject:
Contemporary Women
Subject:
Mothers and daughters
Subject:
Bildungsromans
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-Contemporary Women
Subject:
Literary
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Classic Feminist Writers
Publication Date:
20090931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.6 x 6.1 x 0.8 in 12 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Contemporary Women
History and Social Science » American Studies » Popular Culture

The Love Children New Trade Paper
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$15.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Feminist Press - English 9781558616066 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Marilyn French's The Women's Room, published in 1977, spoke to a generation. In this final novel, published posthumously, French uses the social unrest of the late 1960s as the seedbed for modern dissatisfaction. Jess Leighton navigates her parents' divorce, the Vietnam War, racism and her burgeoning sexuality with difficulty. She plunges into sex, drugs, bad relationships and life on a commune growing organic vegetables, something she had never imagined back in high school in Cambridge, Mass. A novel that feels like a memoir, there are many beautiful passages and poignant moments, but French tries to cover too much and tells more than she shows. When she pulls back the curtain on specific, life-changing moments in Jess's life, the writing is strong and the investment in the characters deep, which makes the weaker sections all the more frustrating. French's disciples will laud this as a life-affirming work; her critics will dismiss it; but it's too complex and nuanced a novel to be banished into either camp. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A novel that feels like memoir, there are many beautiful passages and poignant moments. . . "
"Review" by , "French's meticulous and affecting tale of the forging of one woman’s conscience encompasses thoughtful portraits of 'love children', from peace activists to members of unconventional families, and a forthright critique of the counterculture that puts today's wars, struggles for equality, and environmental troubles into sharp perspective."
"Synopsis" by , How the daughters of The Women's Room generation make lives of their own.
"Synopsis" by , Fiction. It is the late 1960s in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Grateful Dead is playing on the radio and teenagers are wearing long hair and blue jeans. Jess Leighton, the daughter of a temperamental painter and a proto-feminist Harvard professor, is struggling to make sense of her world amid racial tensions, Vietnam War protests, and anti-government rage. With more options than her mother's generation, but no role model for creating the life she desires, Jess experiments with sex and psychedelic drugs as she searches for happiness on her own terms. In the midst of joining and fleeing a commune, growing organic vegetables, and operating a sustainable restaurant, Jess grapples with the legacy of her mother's generation.
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