Mega Dose
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$6.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Science Reference- General

Sell Yourself to Science: The Complete Guide to Selling Your Organs, Body Fluids, Bodily Functions and Being a Human Guinea Pig

by

Sell Yourself to Science: The Complete Guide to Selling Your Organs, Body Fluids, Bodily Functions and Being a Human Guinea Pig Cover

ISBN13: 9781559500845
ISBN10: 1559500840
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $6.95!

 

Staff Pick

When I was in college, I donated plasma a dozen times to the Alpha Plasma Center in downtown Portland. I have a tiny white scar in the pit of my right forearm to prove it. Why did I waste my afternoons lounging on a vinyl recliner with a giant needle up my arm? Well, like everyone else there, I was flat broke. Back in 1991, I only got $15 for half a pint of plasma. I almost passed out walking across the street afterwards. After being sucked dry, I'd lurch to the Scary Safeway on Jefferson to buy some food, but only had half a bag of groceries to show for it. Had I read Jim Hogshire's Sell Yourself to Science, I would've learned that there are far more profitable ways to make a buck.

This remarkably informative book is divided into two basic sections. The first half of Sell Yourself to Science tells the reader what it's like to be a medical guinea pig. The rest is a primer on how to donate or rent your body parts or body byproducts, such as body fluids, eggs, kidneys, parts of your liver, bone marrow, and corneas.

The "guinea pig" section deals only with "Phase One" medical studies — that is, scientific testing on healthy human beings. Hogshire is pretty honest about the unglamorous realities of being paid to be medically tested upon. One professional test subject likened the experience to "being in jail, only you're getting paid." Everything must be controlled and rigorously timed in order to get FDA approval, so while you're a test subject, your body belongs to the doctors. The pay is okay, but nothing great — it's considered "coercive" to pay lots of money for medical testing. Depending on the study, you might get to enjoy some recreational drugs, or you might be part of a laxative study. Or you might sleep 18 hours a day — there's no knowing what will be in store for you. So, why would people subject themselves to this? Well, it's a good gig for folks who don't like bosses and petty office politics. You also don't need much talent or brains to be a medical guinea pig — all you need is average good health. You get free cafeteria food and a bed to sleep in. The most famous medical case study subject might be the late, great author Ken Kesey, who got paid to take LSD daily back in the 1950's. However, most gigs aren't this good.

Jim Hogshire writes at length about the very profitable business of selling body fluids and/or organs. Everyone involved with this business makes a great deal of money — that is, everyone except the donor, who provided the desired product for free. For example, a person who donated a pint of blood gets only cookies and juice as compensation. However, Hogshire writes, the Red Cross sells that blood to blood banks for $150 a pint. To be fair, the Red Cross used to pay folks who donated blood, but found that this practice attracted drunks, who obviously had poor quality blood. Volunteers, however, provided better quality blood, so the Red Cross doesn't pay anybody anymore. The same principle goes for bone marrow, which is worth up to $10,000 a cup. In other countries such as Britain, Germany, the Phillipines and India, it's perfectly legal to sell body organs (as long as someone doesn't murder for them). Filipino prisoners can support their families by selling one of their functional kidneys. And did you know that 3/4 of your liver can be cut away only to regenerate to its original size in only a few weeks? You can get up to $150,000 for a slice of your liver, but since 1 out of 100 people die during liver operations, you might want to take these odds into consideration before signing a consent form.

You may not agree with all of Hogshire's politics about body farming, but Sell Yourself to Science is a well-researched and compelling book. Even if you have no plans of selling yourself to scientists, this book is a fascinating study of those who do, and the legal and ethical conflicts that result.
Recommended by Carole R., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the frontiers of modern physics and beyond, come the books in this section. You really should be aware of these things, since the Science of Now will determine the shape of the future.

This book shows exactly what your body is worth and how to sell it, in whole or in part. Your body is your business when you sell renewable resources such as blood, sperm, milk and hair. You can also arrange to sell your heart, lungs and other vital organs in the most unusual "going out of business" sale you've ever heard of. This amazing "career guide" also reveals what it's like to work as a guinea pig for drug companies. It can pay up to $100 a day, and this book lists more than 150 active test sites.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

mghouston, June 5, 2007 (view all comments by mghouston)
Ithink it's awesome!!!!! I can't believe that it took me 5 minutes to find this answer to my queston.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781559500845
Subtitle:
(the complete guide to selling your organs, body fluids, bodily functions and being a human guinea pig )
Author:
Hogshire, Jim.
Publisher:
Loompanics Unlimited
Location:
Port Townsend, Wash. :
Subject:
Drugs
Subject:
Donation of organs, tissues, etc.
Subject:
Drugs -- United States -- Testing.
Copyright:
Series Volume:
vol. III
Publication Date:
c1992
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
iv, 160 p.

Other books you might like

  1. The Sibling Slam Book: What It's... Used Trade Paper $10.95
  2. Getting the Most from Your Scrapbook... Used Trade Paper $6.50
  3. First Cut: A Season in the Human... Used Trade Paper $10.00
  4. The Ingredients: A Guided Tour of... Used Hardcover $15.50
  5. House of Leaves: A Novel
    Used Trade Paper $11.00
  6. Predictions for a New Millennium Used Trade Paper $5.95

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Reference » Science Reference » General

Sell Yourself to Science: The Complete Guide to Selling Your Organs, Body Fluids, Bodily Functions and Being a Human Guinea Pig Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details iv, 160 p. pages Loompanics Unlimited,c1992. - English 9781559500845 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

When I was in college, I donated plasma a dozen times to the Alpha Plasma Center in downtown Portland. I have a tiny white scar in the pit of my right forearm to prove it. Why did I waste my afternoons lounging on a vinyl recliner with a giant needle up my arm? Well, like everyone else there, I was flat broke. Back in 1991, I only got $15 for half a pint of plasma. I almost passed out walking across the street afterwards. After being sucked dry, I'd lurch to the Scary Safeway on Jefferson to buy some food, but only had half a bag of groceries to show for it. Had I read Jim Hogshire's Sell Yourself to Science, I would've learned that there are far more profitable ways to make a buck.

This remarkably informative book is divided into two basic sections. The first half of Sell Yourself to Science tells the reader what it's like to be a medical guinea pig. The rest is a primer on how to donate or rent your body parts or body byproducts, such as body fluids, eggs, kidneys, parts of your liver, bone marrow, and corneas.

The "guinea pig" section deals only with "Phase One" medical studies — that is, scientific testing on healthy human beings. Hogshire is pretty honest about the unglamorous realities of being paid to be medically tested upon. One professional test subject likened the experience to "being in jail, only you're getting paid." Everything must be controlled and rigorously timed in order to get FDA approval, so while you're a test subject, your body belongs to the doctors. The pay is okay, but nothing great — it's considered "coercive" to pay lots of money for medical testing. Depending on the study, you might get to enjoy some recreational drugs, or you might be part of a laxative study. Or you might sleep 18 hours a day — there's no knowing what will be in store for you. So, why would people subject themselves to this? Well, it's a good gig for folks who don't like bosses and petty office politics. You also don't need much talent or brains to be a medical guinea pig — all you need is average good health. You get free cafeteria food and a bed to sleep in. The most famous medical case study subject might be the late, great author Ken Kesey, who got paid to take LSD daily back in the 1950's. However, most gigs aren't this good.

Jim Hogshire writes at length about the very profitable business of selling body fluids and/or organs. Everyone involved with this business makes a great deal of money — that is, everyone except the donor, who provided the desired product for free. For example, a person who donated a pint of blood gets only cookies and juice as compensation. However, Hogshire writes, the Red Cross sells that blood to blood banks for $150 a pint. To be fair, the Red Cross used to pay folks who donated blood, but found that this practice attracted drunks, who obviously had poor quality blood. Volunteers, however, provided better quality blood, so the Red Cross doesn't pay anybody anymore. The same principle goes for bone marrow, which is worth up to $10,000 a cup. In other countries such as Britain, Germany, the Phillipines and India, it's perfectly legal to sell body organs (as long as someone doesn't murder for them). Filipino prisoners can support their families by selling one of their functional kidneys. And did you know that 3/4 of your liver can be cut away only to regenerate to its original size in only a few weeks? You can get up to $150,000 for a slice of your liver, but since 1 out of 100 people die during liver operations, you might want to take these odds into consideration before signing a consent form.

You may not agree with all of Hogshire's politics about body farming, but Sell Yourself to Science is a well-researched and compelling book. Even if you have no plans of selling yourself to scientists, this book is a fascinating study of those who do, and the legal and ethical conflicts that result.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.