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1 Hawthorne Feminist Studies- World Feminism

I Killed Scheherazade: Confessions of an Angry Arab Woman

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I Killed Scheherazade: Confessions of an Angry Arab Woman Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Joumana Haddad is angry. She finds the West's portrayal of Arab women appalling. And the image projected by many Middle Eastern women can be infuriating as well. "Being an Arab today means you need to be a hypocrite," Haddad boldly states in I Killed Scheherazade. And "We constantly and obsessively think about sex, but dare not talk about it. We rid ourselves of one so-called abomination with one hand, then practice intellectual debauchery, which is much worse, with the other." 

            In I Killed Scheherazade Haddad challenges prevalent notions of identity and womanhood in the Middle East and speaks of her own intellectual development and the liberating effect of literature on her life, ultimately arguing that every woman has not only the right but the duty to ignore social, political, and sexual expectations and be true to herself. Fiery and candid, this is a provocative exploration of what it means to be an Arab woman today that will enlighten and inform a new international feminism.

Review:

"Poet and translator Haddad's quarterly, Jasad, a controversial magazine in the Arab world for its emphasis on the human body (and nude photographs), sparked a question from a non-Arab journalist about how an Arab woman could spearhead an erotic publication. The incident prompted Haddad to compose this brief, spirited text about life as a 'liberated Arab woman' in modern Beirut. A somewhat pedantic introduction ('if you are longing to be comforted in your Orientalist views... you'd better not go any further') soon gives way to a more exploratory, philosophical tone as Haddad sets about to deconstruct and analyze what it means to be an Arab woman writer. Part memoir, part argument, Haddad's book examines subjects as wide-ranging as her childhood hatred of Barbies, reading de Sade and Lolita, the nature of home and attachment, the trouble with Beirut ('Where homosexuals have to hide as if they represent a deadly plague'), and why she created Jasad in the first place. The title, a reference to the protagonist of The Arabian Nights whose life is spared by the king because of her ability to entertain him with stories, becomes an appropriate central metaphor for Haddad's project — tearing down the classic 'symbol of Arab female cultural oppression' — in a book that, despite its polemical nature, is surprisingly entertaining. (Sept)." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Joumana Haddad is angry. She finds the Wests portrayal of Arab women appalling and the image projected by many Middle Eastern women infuriating. “Being an Arab today means you need to be a hypocrite,” Haddad boldly states. “We constantly and obsessively think about sex but dare not talk about it.” In I Killed Scheherazade, Haddad challenges prevalent notions of Arab womanhood and, in the process, shatters the centuries-old stereotype of Scheherazade, the virgin heroine of The Arabian Nights who won the kings affections. Fiery and candid, this provocative exploration of what it means to be an Arab woman today will enlighten and inform a new international feminism.

Synopsis:

For centuries the heroine of The Arabian Nights, Scheherazade, defined the Arab woman—until Joumana Haddad, an Arab woman herself, had had enough. Haddad angrily challenges prevalent notions of identity and womanhood in the Middle East in this intrepid exploration. While she finds the West’s dominant portrayal of Arab women appalling, she finds the image projected by many Middle Eastern women to be infuriating as well. She discusses her intellectual development and the liberating effect of literature on her life, and in the process she transcends religious and cultural perspectives. Ultimately she argues that every woman has not only the right but the duty to ignore social, political, and sexual expectations and be true to herself. Fiery and candid, this is a provocative exploration of what it means to be an Arab woman today that will enlighten and inform a new international feminism. For Haddad, Scheherazade is dead, and the time has come for Arab women to tell their own stories.

About the Author

Joumana Haddad is an award-winning poet, translator, magazine publisher, and journalist. Cultural editor for an Arab newspaper, in 2008 she launched the Arab world's first erotic cultural magazine, Jasad (Body), which made international headlines and caused her to be dubbed "the Carrie Bradshaw of Beirut." She lives in Lebanon.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781569768402
Author:
Haddad, Joumana
Publisher:
Chicago Review Press
Subject:
Biography-Women
Subject:
Women's Studies
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20110931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in

Related Subjects

Biography » Women
History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » World Feminism
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Middle East » Women and Gender
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Political Science
History and Social Science » Sociology » Islamic Studies

I Killed Scheherazade: Confessions of an Angry Arab Woman Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Lawrence Hill Books - English 9781569768402 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Poet and translator Haddad's quarterly, Jasad, a controversial magazine in the Arab world for its emphasis on the human body (and nude photographs), sparked a question from a non-Arab journalist about how an Arab woman could spearhead an erotic publication. The incident prompted Haddad to compose this brief, spirited text about life as a 'liberated Arab woman' in modern Beirut. A somewhat pedantic introduction ('if you are longing to be comforted in your Orientalist views... you'd better not go any further') soon gives way to a more exploratory, philosophical tone as Haddad sets about to deconstruct and analyze what it means to be an Arab woman writer. Part memoir, part argument, Haddad's book examines subjects as wide-ranging as her childhood hatred of Barbies, reading de Sade and Lolita, the nature of home and attachment, the trouble with Beirut ('Where homosexuals have to hide as if they represent a deadly plague'), and why she created Jasad in the first place. The title, a reference to the protagonist of The Arabian Nights whose life is spared by the king because of her ability to entertain him with stories, becomes an appropriate central metaphor for Haddad's project — tearing down the classic 'symbol of Arab female cultural oppression' — in a book that, despite its polemical nature, is surprisingly entertaining. (Sept)." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

Joumana Haddad is angry. She finds the Wests portrayal of Arab women appalling and the image projected by many Middle Eastern women infuriating. “Being an Arab today means you need to be a hypocrite,” Haddad boldly states. “We constantly and obsessively think about sex but dare not talk about it.” In I Killed Scheherazade, Haddad challenges prevalent notions of Arab womanhood and, in the process, shatters the centuries-old stereotype of Scheherazade, the virgin heroine of The Arabian Nights who won the kings affections. Fiery and candid, this provocative exploration of what it means to be an Arab woman today will enlighten and inform a new international feminism.

"Synopsis" by ,

For centuries the heroine of The Arabian Nights, Scheherazade, defined the Arab woman—until Joumana Haddad, an Arab woman herself, had had enough. Haddad angrily challenges prevalent notions of identity and womanhood in the Middle East in this intrepid exploration. While she finds the West’s dominant portrayal of Arab women appalling, she finds the image projected by many Middle Eastern women to be infuriating as well. She discusses her intellectual development and the liberating effect of literature on her life, and in the process she transcends religious and cultural perspectives. Ultimately she argues that every woman has not only the right but the duty to ignore social, political, and sexual expectations and be true to herself. Fiery and candid, this is a provocative exploration of what it means to be an Arab woman today that will enlighten and inform a new international feminism. For Haddad, Scheherazade is dead, and the time has come for Arab women to tell their own stories.

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