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The Boundaries of Her Body: The Troubling History of Women's Rights in America

The Boundaries of Her Body: The Troubling History of Women's Rights in America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A detailed survey of the history of women's rights and how the biology of a woman has controlled her legal rights for centuries.

Review:

"In this masterful treatise, legal journalist Rowland analyzes how women's rights have, and have not, evolved since the signing of the Mayflower Compact in 1620 (though the bulk of the book covers just the 20th century). From time immemorial, women were perceived as having the singular mission of bearing and raising children, says Rowland, who documents the consequences of this view: until the late 19th century, women's rights derived from husbands, fathers and sons. It was believed that their biology made women incapable of thinking rationally — hence they could not own property, vote or work as many hours or for as much pay as men. Nor could they have sex not aimed at procreation without social and legal opprobrium. Rowland documents how a legal 'zone of privacy' granted men as far back as the 1620s didn't accrue to women until 1965, when the Supreme Court legalized contraception. Drawing on legal and historical sources as well as the Bible, the journals of Meriwether Lewis and Lolita, Rowland covers every imaginable aspect of women's legal lives, up to the present day. This massive and remarkable history is well written in smart yet accessible language and is thus the perfect book for the classroom as well as the family room." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Chicago-based writer, artist, and civil rights attorney Rowland covers the period from the 1600's to the early 1900s in the first section, then examines developments in the 20th century in a long second section. Final sections look at the politics of female adolescence and violence and women, mainly as contemporary issues but with some historical considerations.
Annotation 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781572483682
Subtitle:
The Troubling History of Women's Rights in America
Publisher:
Sphinx Publishing
Author:
Rowland, Debran
Location:
Naperville, Ill.
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
A01A0022
Publication Date:
August 2004
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
788
Dimensions:
900x600

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » General
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies

The Boundaries of Her Body: The Troubling History of Women's Rights in America
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Product details 788 pages Sphinx Publishing - English 9781572483682 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this masterful treatise, legal journalist Rowland analyzes how women's rights have, and have not, evolved since the signing of the Mayflower Compact in 1620 (though the bulk of the book covers just the 20th century). From time immemorial, women were perceived as having the singular mission of bearing and raising children, says Rowland, who documents the consequences of this view: until the late 19th century, women's rights derived from husbands, fathers and sons. It was believed that their biology made women incapable of thinking rationally — hence they could not own property, vote or work as many hours or for as much pay as men. Nor could they have sex not aimed at procreation without social and legal opprobrium. Rowland documents how a legal 'zone of privacy' granted men as far back as the 1620s didn't accrue to women until 1965, when the Supreme Court legalized contraception. Drawing on legal and historical sources as well as the Bible, the journals of Meriwether Lewis and Lolita, Rowland covers every imaginable aspect of women's legal lives, up to the present day. This massive and remarkable history is well written in smart yet accessible language and is thus the perfect book for the classroom as well as the family room." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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