Mega Dose
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Interviews | September 2, 2014

    Jill Owens: IMG David Mitchell: The Powells.com Interview



    David Mitchell's newest mind-bending, time-skipping novel may be his most accomplished work yet. Written in six sections, one per decade, The Bone... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.95
List price: $17.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Burnside Gay and Lesbian- Men's Fiction
3 Burnside Literature- A to Z
2 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z

This title in other editions

The Line of Beauty

by

The Line of Beauty Cover

 

Awards

2004 Man Booker Prize for Fiction

Review-A-Day

"[Hollinghurst's] best writing is more disciplined than this, more subtly melded of its thematic constituents, and above all more profound, more truly Jamesian in its treatment of the ordeals of consciousness. Nonetheless, there is much to savour in The Line of Beauty: not least its humour, a shivering yet morally exacting satire that leaves no character untouched and finally consumes the grotesques whose odiousness it has so generously indulged. Equally and characteristically, there is the stinging precision of its prose, a near-poetic aptitude for producing the very thing its title tantalizingly portends." Henry Hitching, The Times Literary Supplement (read the entire Times Literary Supplement reveiw)

"Line for line, Hollinghurst's novel about London during the 1980s is the most exquisitely written book I've read in years. Witty observations about politics, society, and family open like little revelations on every page. But it's also an explicitly gay novel....All this should produce a complex reception for the Booker winner. In some quarters, the novel's triumph will be a late vindication for gay literature. Others will fret over the shocking sex scenes. But anyone who reads The Line of Beauty will come face to face with one of the most brilliant stylists and perceptive novelists writing today." Ron Charles, The Christian Science Monitor (read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)

"Hollinghurst's prose is a genuine achievement — lavish, poised, sinuously alert. His sentences are rich but not languid. He is an aesthete who finally avoids aestheticism, partly because, in a characteristic Jamesian swerve, he is morally suspicious of an aestheticism whose charms he also swayingly registers. His writing is most Jamesian, perhaps, in its constant air of poised intelligence..." James Wood, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the summer of 1983, twenty-year-old Nick Guest moves into an attic room in the Notting Hill home of the Feddens: conservative Member of Parliament Gerald, his wealthy wife Rachel, and their two children, Toby — whom Nick had idolized at Oxford — and Catherine, highly critical of her family's assumptions and ambitions.

As the boom years of the eighties unfold, Nick, an innocent in the world of politics and money, finds his life altered by the rising fortunes of this glamorous family. His two vividly contrasting love affairs, one with a young black clerk and one with a Lebanese millionaire, dramatize the dangers and rewards of his own private pursuit of beauty, a pursuit as compelling to Nick as the desire for power and riches among his friends. Richly textured, emotionally charged, disarmingly comic, this is a major work by one of our finest writers.

Review:

"Among its other wonders, this almost perfectly written novel, recently longlisted for the Mann Booker, delineates what's arguably the most coruscating portrait of a plutocracy since Goya painted the Spanish Bourbons. To shade in the nuances of class, Hollingsworth uses plot the way it was meant to be used — not as a line of utility, but as a thematically connected sequence of events that creates its own mini-value system and symbols.The book is divided into three sections, dated 1983, 1986 and 1987. The protagonist, Nick Guest, is a James scholar in the making and a tripper in the fast gay culture of the time. The first section shows Nick moving into the Notting Hill mansion of Gerald Fedden, one of Thatcher's Tory MPs, at the request of the minister's son, Toby, Nick's all-too-straight Oxford crush. Nick becomes Toby's sister Catherine's confidante, securing his place in the house, and loses his virginity spectacularly to Leo, a black council worker. The next section jumps the reader ahead to a more sophisticated Nick. Leo has dropped out of the picture; cocaine, three-ways and another Oxford alum, the sinisterly alluring, wealthy Lebanese Wani Ouradi, have taken his place. Nick is dimly aware of running too many risks with Wani, and becomes accidentally aware that Gerald is running a few, too. Disaster comes in 1987, with a media scandal that engulfs Gerald and then entangles Nick. While Hollinghurst's story has the true feel of Jamesian drama, it is the authorial intelligence illuminating otherwise trivial pieces of story business so as to make them seem alive and mysteriously significant that gives the most pleasure. This is Nick coming home for the first and only time with the closeted Leo: 'there were two front doors set side by side in the shallow recess of the porch. Leo applied himself to the right hand one, and it was one of those locks that require tender probings and tuggings, infinitesimal withdrawals, to get the key to turn.' This novel has the air of a classic. Agent, Emma Parry. (Oct.) Forecast: Widely praised for his three previous novels, Hollinghurst (The Swimming-Pool Library) is primed for even greater acclaim and sales with this masterful volume, the latest in a wave of Jamesian novels." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Hollinghurst writes harsh but deeply informed social satire, just as Proust diid. He writes the best prose we have today." Edmund White

Review:

"There is something memorable on every page...a shivering yet morally exacting ssatire that leaves no character untouched." Times Literary Supplement

Review:

"Vast scope...smart, funny, and for all its vividly engaging ways, a pretty souund document of the times." GQ

Review:

"Must rank among the funniest [novels] ever written about Thatcher's Britain, whhile remaining one of the most tragically sad." Financial Times

Review:

"Hollinghurst proves to be one of the sharpest observers of privileged social grroupings since Anthony Powell." Guardian

Review:

"A classic of our times.The work of a great English stylist in full maturity; a masterpiece." Observer

Review:

"Wonderful... almost unbelievably well-written. In its dazzling, very contemporrary way, the book is tragic.But it is also consistently funny." Spectator

Review:

"Luminous...a crafty, glittering, sidelong bid by a contemporary master of Engliish prose to be considered heir to James himself." The Times

Review:

"Exquisitely written...Its delights and rewards extend beyond its comic or docummentary achievements." Sunday Times

Review:

"A richly literate, ambitious piece of work....deserves to be widely read." Evening Standard

Review:

"Stunning...[A] joy to read. It is solid and traditional, beautifully crafted — a quiet masterpiece." Scotland on Sunday

Review:

"Edmund White has said that Alan Hollinghurst 'writes the best prose we have today.' I might not go that far...but if you value style, wit and social satire in your reading, don't miss this elegant and passionate novel." Michael Dirda, The Washington Post

Review:

"It is only worrisome that The Line of Beauty, one of the most mentally nurturing reads this year, is so similar to The Swimming-Pool Library; one hopes that Hollinghurst, who should be beloved, will take us farther afield in the future." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Hollinghurst is most striking here for his successful, often damning, observations about the vast divides between the ruling class and everyone else....A beautifully realized portrait of a decade and a social class, but without a well-developed emotional core." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"As a novelist, Alan Hollinghurst has set himself an intimidating standard....To say...that his latest novel, the Booker Prize-winning Line of Beauty, is also his finest should give some idea of its accomplishment." New York Times

Review:

"Hollinghurst has placed his gay protagonist within a larger social context, and the result is his most tender and powerful novel to date, a sprawling and haunting elegy to the 1980s. A" Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"Mr. Hollinghurst's great gift as a novelist is for social satire as sharp and transparent as glass....The Line of Beauty is unlikely to be surpassed." New York Observer

Review:

"A magnificent comedy of manners. Hollinghurst's alertness to the tiniest social and tonal shifts never slackens, and positively luxuriates in a number of unimprovably droll set pieces...[an] outstanding novel." New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

THE NATIONAL BESTSELLER, WINNER OF THE 2004 MAN BOOKER PRIZE FOR FICTION, AND NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST

  

A New York Times Bestseller (Extended) · A LA Times Bestseller List · A Book Sense National Bestseller · A Northern California Bestseller · A Sunday Times Bestseller List · A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

And chosen as one of the best books of 2004 by:

Entertainment Weekly  · The Washington Post · The San Francisco Chronicle · The Seattle Times

Newsday  · Salon.com · The Boston Globe · The New York Sun · The Miami Herald  · The Dallas Morning News · San Jose Mercury News · Publishers Weekly

 

Alan Hollinghurst is the author of The Swimming-Pool Library, The Spell, and The Folding Star. He has received the Somerset Maugham Award, the E. M. Forster Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction. He lives in London.
Winner of the Man Booker Prize for Fiction

A New York Times Notable Book

It is the summer of 1983, and twenty-year-old Nick Guest has moved into an attic room in the Notting Hill home of the Feddens: conservative Member of Parliament Gerald, his wealthy wife Rachel, and their two children, Toby—whom Nick had idolized at Oxford—and Catherine, highly critical of her family's assumptions and ambitions, who becomes both a friend to Nick and his uneasy responsibility.

As the boom years of the mid-eighties unfold, Nick, an innocent in matter of politics and money, becomes caught up in the Feddens' world—its grand parties, its surprising alliances, its parade of monsters both comic and menacing. In an era of endless possibility, he finds himself able to pursue his own private obsession with beauty—a prize as compelling to him as power and riches are to his friends. An affair with a young black clerk gives him his first experience of romance, but it is a later affair with a beautiful millionaire that will change his life more drastically and bring into question the larger fantasies of a ruthless decade.

Framed by the two election that returned Margaret Thatcher to power, The Line of Beauty unfurls through four extraordinary years of change and tragedy. Richly textured, emotionally charged, disarmingly funny, this is a major work by one of our finest writers.

Winner of the 2004 Man Booker Prize for Fiction

A New York Times Notable Book of 2004

 
"A magnificent comedy of manners. Hollinghurst's alertness to the tiniest social and tonal shifts never slackens, and positively luxuriates in a number of unimprovably droll set pieces . . . [an] outstanding novel."—New York Times Book Review
"A magnificent comedy of manners. Hollinghurst's alertness to the tiniest social and tonal shifts never slackens, and positively luxuriates in a number of unimprovably droll set pieces . . . [an] outstanding novel."—New York Times Book Review
 
"His most tender and powerful novel to date, a sprawling and haunting elegy to the 1980s."—Entertainment Weekly
 
"Mr. Hollinghurst's great gift as a novelist is for social satire as sharp and transparent at glass, catching his quarry from an angle just an inch to the left of the view they themselves would catch in the mantelpiece mirror . . . The Line of Beauty is unlikely to be surpassed."—New York Observer
 
"Vast scope . . . smart, funny, and for all its vividly engaging ways, a pretty sound document of the times."—GQ
 
"Must rank among the funniest [novels] ever written about Thatcher's Britain, while remaining one of the most tragically sad."—Financial Times
 
"Hollinghurst proves to be one of the sharpest observers of privileged social groupings since Anthony Powell."—The Guardian
 
"[The] pointillist attention to detail makes every character fascinating."—The Miami Herald
 
"Wonderful . . . almost unbelievably well-written. In its dazzling, very contemporary way, the book is tragic. But it is also consistently funny."—The Spectator
 
"Luminous . . . a crafty, glittering, sidelong bid by a contemporary master of English prose to be considered heir to James himself."—The Times (London)
 
"Hollinghurst's first novel, The Swimming-Pool Library (1988), won major acclaim and many awards. His latest novel engages similar themes—a young man new to both his sexuality and the manners of high society. Set in London during the early 1980s, the economy is booming, the Tories have just been swept into power, Margaret Thatcher is prime minister, and the country is awash in hope and excitement. Nick Guest, fresh out of Oxford, is staying in London with the Fedden family—whose son, Toby, was Nick's dearest friend at Oxford. The father, Gerald, is a newly elected conservative member of parliament and is infatuated with Thatcher, whom he calls 'the Lady.' Nick, by his proximity to the Feddens, attends swank parties, packed with MPs, cabinet ministers, and nobility, all of whom harbor the expectation that 'the Lady' might appear at any minute. Meanwhile, Nick embarks on two love affairs—first with Leo, a young black London clerk, and later with Wani, a Lebanese millionaire and friend from Oxford. After nights of parties, drugs, sex, and snobbery, scandal—in which Nick plays an unwilling part—visits the Fedden family. The material and social excesses of the 1980s are deftly portrayed in Hollinghurst's latest success."—Michael Spinella, Booklist
 
"Almost perfectly written . . . this novel has the air of a classic."—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Synopsis:

THE NATIONAL BESTSELLER, WINNER OF THE 2004 MAN BOOKER PRIZE FOR FICTION, AND NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST

Winner of 2004s Man Booker Prize for fiction and one of the most talked about books of the year, The Line of Beauty is a sweeping novel about class, sex, and money that brings Thatchers London alive.

A New York Times Bestseller (Extended) · A LA Times Bestseller List · A Book Sense National Bestseller · A Northern California Bestseller · A Sunday Times Bestseller List · A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

And chosen as one of the best books of 2004 by:

Entertainment Weekly · The Washington Post · The San Francisco Chronicle · The Seattle Times

Newsday · Salon.com · The Boston Globe · The New York Sun · The Miami Herald · The Dallas Morning News · San Jose Mercury News · Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Alan Hollinghurst is the author of three novels, The Swimming-Pool Library, The Folding Star, and The Spell. He lives in London.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781582346106
Author:
Hollinghurst, Alan
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Gay
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20051031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in

Other books you might like

  1. Engleby (Vintage International) Used Trade Paper $7.50
  2. How I Paid for College: A Novel of... Used Trade Paper $5.50
  3. Cloud Atlas: A Novel
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  4. The Plot against America: A Novel
    Used Book Club Paperback $1.48
  5. The Master
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  6. Gilead: A Novel
    Used Hardcover $5.95

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Literature
Featured Titles » Man Booker Prize Winners
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Gay and Lesbian » Fiction and Poetry » Gay Fiction
Gay and Lesbian » Fiction and Poetry » Men's Fiction
History and Social Science » American Studies » Popular Culture

The Line of Beauty Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Bloomsbury Publishing PLC - English 9781582346106 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Among its other wonders, this almost perfectly written novel, recently longlisted for the Mann Booker, delineates what's arguably the most coruscating portrait of a plutocracy since Goya painted the Spanish Bourbons. To shade in the nuances of class, Hollingsworth uses plot the way it was meant to be used — not as a line of utility, but as a thematically connected sequence of events that creates its own mini-value system and symbols.The book is divided into three sections, dated 1983, 1986 and 1987. The protagonist, Nick Guest, is a James scholar in the making and a tripper in the fast gay culture of the time. The first section shows Nick moving into the Notting Hill mansion of Gerald Fedden, one of Thatcher's Tory MPs, at the request of the minister's son, Toby, Nick's all-too-straight Oxford crush. Nick becomes Toby's sister Catherine's confidante, securing his place in the house, and loses his virginity spectacularly to Leo, a black council worker. The next section jumps the reader ahead to a more sophisticated Nick. Leo has dropped out of the picture; cocaine, three-ways and another Oxford alum, the sinisterly alluring, wealthy Lebanese Wani Ouradi, have taken his place. Nick is dimly aware of running too many risks with Wani, and becomes accidentally aware that Gerald is running a few, too. Disaster comes in 1987, with a media scandal that engulfs Gerald and then entangles Nick. While Hollinghurst's story has the true feel of Jamesian drama, it is the authorial intelligence illuminating otherwise trivial pieces of story business so as to make them seem alive and mysteriously significant that gives the most pleasure. This is Nick coming home for the first and only time with the closeted Leo: 'there were two front doors set side by side in the shallow recess of the porch. Leo applied himself to the right hand one, and it was one of those locks that require tender probings and tuggings, infinitesimal withdrawals, to get the key to turn.' This novel has the air of a classic. Agent, Emma Parry. (Oct.) Forecast: Widely praised for his three previous novels, Hollinghurst (The Swimming-Pool Library) is primed for even greater acclaim and sales with this masterful volume, the latest in a wave of Jamesian novels." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[Hollinghurst's] best writing is more disciplined than this, more subtly melded of its thematic constituents, and above all more profound, more truly Jamesian in its treatment of the ordeals of consciousness. Nonetheless, there is much to savour in The Line of Beauty: not least its humour, a shivering yet morally exacting satire that leaves no character untouched and finally consumes the grotesques whose odiousness it has so generously indulged. Equally and characteristically, there is the stinging precision of its prose, a near-poetic aptitude for producing the very thing its title tantalizingly portends." (read the entire Times Literary Supplement reveiw)
"Review A Day" by , "Line for line, Hollinghurst's novel about London during the 1980s is the most exquisitely written book I've read in years. Witty observations about politics, society, and family open like little revelations on every page. But it's also an explicitly gay novel....All this should produce a complex reception for the Booker winner. In some quarters, the novel's triumph will be a late vindication for gay literature. Others will fret over the shocking sex scenes. But anyone who reads The Line of Beauty will come face to face with one of the most brilliant stylists and perceptive novelists writing today." (read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)
"Review A Day" by , "Hollinghurst's prose is a genuine achievement — lavish, poised, sinuously alert. His sentences are rich but not languid. He is an aesthete who finally avoids aestheticism, partly because, in a characteristic Jamesian swerve, he is morally suspicious of an aestheticism whose charms he also swayingly registers. His writing is most Jamesian, perhaps, in its constant air of poised intelligence..." (read the entire New Republic review)
"Review" by , "Hollinghurst writes harsh but deeply informed social satire, just as Proust diid. He writes the best prose we have today."
"Review" by , "There is something memorable on every page...a shivering yet morally exacting ssatire that leaves no character untouched."
"Review" by , "Vast scope...smart, funny, and for all its vividly engaging ways, a pretty souund document of the times."
"Review" by , "Must rank among the funniest [novels] ever written about Thatcher's Britain, whhile remaining one of the most tragically sad."
"Review" by , "Hollinghurst proves to be one of the sharpest observers of privileged social grroupings since Anthony Powell."
"Review" by , "A classic of our times.The work of a great English stylist in full maturity; a masterpiece."
"Review" by , "Wonderful... almost unbelievably well-written. In its dazzling, very contemporrary way, the book is tragic.But it is also consistently funny."
"Review" by , "Luminous...a crafty, glittering, sidelong bid by a contemporary master of Engliish prose to be considered heir to James himself."
"Review" by , "Exquisitely written...Its delights and rewards extend beyond its comic or docummentary achievements."
"Review" by , "A richly literate, ambitious piece of work....deserves to be widely read."
"Review" by , "Stunning...[A] joy to read. It is solid and traditional, beautifully crafted — a quiet masterpiece."
"Review" by , "Edmund White has said that Alan Hollinghurst 'writes the best prose we have today.' I might not go that far...but if you value style, wit and social satire in your reading, don't miss this elegant and passionate novel."
"Review" by , "It is only worrisome that The Line of Beauty, one of the most mentally nurturing reads this year, is so similar to The Swimming-Pool Library; one hopes that Hollinghurst, who should be beloved, will take us farther afield in the future."
"Review" by , "Hollinghurst is most striking here for his successful, often damning, observations about the vast divides between the ruling class and everyone else....A beautifully realized portrait of a decade and a social class, but without a well-developed emotional core."
"Review" by , "As a novelist, Alan Hollinghurst has set himself an intimidating standard....To say...that his latest novel, the Booker Prize-winning Line of Beauty, is also his finest should give some idea of its accomplishment."
"Review" by , "Hollinghurst has placed his gay protagonist within a larger social context, and the result is his most tender and powerful novel to date, a sprawling and haunting elegy to the 1980s. A"
"Review" by , "Mr. Hollinghurst's great gift as a novelist is for social satire as sharp and transparent as glass....The Line of Beauty is unlikely to be surpassed."
"Review" by , "A magnificent comedy of manners. Hollinghurst's alertness to the tiniest social and tonal shifts never slackens, and positively luxuriates in a number of unimprovably droll set pieces...[an] outstanding novel."
"Synopsis" by ,

THE NATIONAL BESTSELLER, WINNER OF THE 2004 MAN BOOKER PRIZE FOR FICTION, AND NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST

  

A New York Times Bestseller (Extended) · A LA Times Bestseller List · A Book Sense National Bestseller · A Northern California Bestseller · A Sunday Times Bestseller List · A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

And chosen as one of the best books of 2004 by:

Entertainment Weekly  · The Washington Post · The San Francisco Chronicle · The Seattle Times

Newsday  · Salon.com · The Boston Globe · The New York Sun · The Miami Herald  · The Dallas Morning News · San Jose Mercury News · Publishers Weekly

 

Alan Hollinghurst is the author of The Swimming-Pool Library, The Spell, and The Folding Star. He has received the Somerset Maugham Award, the E. M. Forster Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction. He lives in London.
Winner of the Man Booker Prize for Fiction

A New York Times Notable Book

It is the summer of 1983, and twenty-year-old Nick Guest has moved into an attic room in the Notting Hill home of the Feddens: conservative Member of Parliament Gerald, his wealthy wife Rachel, and their two children, Toby—whom Nick had idolized at Oxford—and Catherine, highly critical of her family's assumptions and ambitions, who becomes both a friend to Nick and his uneasy responsibility.

As the boom years of the mid-eighties unfold, Nick, an innocent in matter of politics and money, becomes caught up in the Feddens' world—its grand parties, its surprising alliances, its parade of monsters both comic and menacing. In an era of endless possibility, he finds himself able to pursue his own private obsession with beauty—a prize as compelling to him as power and riches are to his friends. An affair with a young black clerk gives him his first experience of romance, but it is a later affair with a beautiful millionaire that will change his life more drastically and bring into question the larger fantasies of a ruthless decade.

Framed by the two election that returned Margaret Thatcher to power, The Line of Beauty unfurls through four extraordinary years of change and tragedy. Richly textured, emotionally charged, disarmingly funny, this is a major work by one of our finest writers.

Winner of the 2004 Man Booker Prize for Fiction

A New York Times Notable Book of 2004

 
"A magnificent comedy of manners. Hollinghurst's alertness to the tiniest social and tonal shifts never slackens, and positively luxuriates in a number of unimprovably droll set pieces . . . [an] outstanding novel."—New York Times Book Review
"A magnificent comedy of manners. Hollinghurst's alertness to the tiniest social and tonal shifts never slackens, and positively luxuriates in a number of unimprovably droll set pieces . . . [an] outstanding novel."—New York Times Book Review
 
"His most tender and powerful novel to date, a sprawling and haunting elegy to the 1980s."—Entertainment Weekly
 
"Mr. Hollinghurst's great gift as a novelist is for social satire as sharp and transparent at glass, catching his quarry from an angle just an inch to the left of the view they themselves would catch in the mantelpiece mirror . . . The Line of Beauty is unlikely to be surpassed."—New York Observer
 
"Vast scope . . . smart, funny, and for all its vividly engaging ways, a pretty sound document of the times."—GQ
 
"Must rank among the funniest [novels] ever written about Thatcher's Britain, while remaining one of the most tragically sad."—Financial Times
 
"Hollinghurst proves to be one of the sharpest observers of privileged social groupings since Anthony Powell."—The Guardian
 
"[The] pointillist attention to detail makes every character fascinating."—The Miami Herald
 
"Wonderful . . . almost unbelievably well-written. In its dazzling, very contemporary way, the book is tragic. But it is also consistently funny."—The Spectator
 
"Luminous . . . a crafty, glittering, sidelong bid by a contemporary master of English prose to be considered heir to James himself."—The Times (London)
 
"Hollinghurst's first novel, The Swimming-Pool Library (1988), won major acclaim and many awards. His latest novel engages similar themes—a young man new to both his sexuality and the manners of high society. Set in London during the early 1980s, the economy is booming, the Tories have just been swept into power, Margaret Thatcher is prime minister, and the country is awash in hope and excitement. Nick Guest, fresh out of Oxford, is staying in London with the Fedden family—whose son, Toby, was Nick's dearest friend at Oxford. The father, Gerald, is a newly elected conservative member of parliament and is infatuated with Thatcher, whom he calls 'the Lady.' Nick, by his proximity to the Feddens, attends swank parties, packed with MPs, cabinet ministers, and nobility, all of whom harbor the expectation that 'the Lady' might appear at any minute. Meanwhile, Nick embarks on two love affairs—first with Leo, a young black London clerk, and later with Wani, a Lebanese millionaire and friend from Oxford. After nights of parties, drugs, sex, and snobbery, scandal—in which Nick plays an unwilling part—visits the Fedden family. The material and social excesses of the 1980s are deftly portrayed in Hollinghurst's latest success."—Michael Spinella, Booklist
 
"Almost perfectly written . . . this novel has the air of a classic."—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Synopsis" by ,
THE NATIONAL BESTSELLER, WINNER OF THE 2004 MAN BOOKER PRIZE FOR FICTION, AND NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST

Winner of 2004s Man Booker Prize for fiction and one of the most talked about books of the year, The Line of Beauty is a sweeping novel about class, sex, and money that brings Thatchers London alive.

A New York Times Bestseller (Extended) · A LA Times Bestseller List · A Book Sense National Bestseller · A Northern California Bestseller · A Sunday Times Bestseller List · A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

And chosen as one of the best books of 2004 by:

Entertainment Weekly · The Washington Post · The San Francisco Chronicle · The Seattle Times

Newsday · Salon.com · The Boston Globe · The New York Sun · The Miami Herald · The Dallas Morning News · San Jose Mercury News · Publishers Weekly

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.