The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | June 18, 2014

Daniel H. Wilson: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Daniel H. Wilson



Like many writers, I'm constantly haunting coffee shops with a laptop out and my headphones on. I listen to a lot of music while I write, and songs... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$16.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
4 Remote Warehouse World History- Germany

Everybody Talks about the Weather . . . We Don't: The Writings of Ulrike Meinhof

by

Everybody Talks about the Weather . . . We Don't: The Writings of Ulrike Meinhof Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

No other figure embodies revolutionary politics, radical chic, and the promises and failures of the New Left quite like Ulrike Meinhof (1934-76). In the 1960s, she was known in Europe as a journalist and public intellectual, leading an exciting life in Hamburg’s high society with her publisher husband and twin daughters. Ten years later, Meinhof gave up her bourgeois existence to form, with Andreas Baader and Gudrun Ensslin, the Red Army Faction (RAF). Also called the Baader-Meinhof Gang, the group was notorious for its politically motivated acts of violence, including bombings, kidnappings, bank robberies, and shootouts with police.

What impels someone to abandon middle-class privilege for the sake of revolution? Meinhof, who spent the 1960s writing a column for the popular leftist magazine konkret, began to see the world in increasingly stark terms: the United States was emerging as an unstoppable superpower and Germany appeared to be run by former Nazis. Never before translated into English, Meinhof’s 1960s columns published in konkret show a woman in transition, reflecting upon the major political events and social currents of her time. An essay by Karin Bauer contextualizes Meinhof’s writings and mesmerizing life story within the political developments of the German Left. Bauer also explores Meinhof’s afterlife and asks why Meinhof’s ghost still haunts us today.

A relentless critic of her mother and of the Left, author and journalist Bettina Röhl, one of Meinhof’s daughters, contributes an afterword that aims to tear down Meinhof’s iconic status. Noting the increasingly desperate tone of Meinhof’s writing, Nobel Prize Laureate Elfriede Jelinek reflects in her foreword on Germany’s missed opportunity to learn from Meinhof’s writings.

Ulrike Meinhof (1934 -1976) was one of the most influential thinkers of the German Left in the 1960s, known primarily through her columns in the magazine, konkret. She became an internationally known fugitive when she aided in the prison escape of Andreas Baader and formed the Red Army Faction, also known as the Baader-Meinhof Gang. She was imprisoned in 1972 and found, four years later, hanged in her cell.

Karin Bauer is associate professor and chair of the Department of German Studies at McGill University.

Book News Annotation:

Before she and others formed the Red Army Faction, known to the press as the Baader-Meinhof Gang, Meinhof (1934-76) was a respected German journalist read throughout Europe. Here is a selection of her columns from 1960 to 1968, showing how she tried to inform her readers about the political situation before dropping into the underground and taking action herself. She was murdered in her prison cell by the police. There is no index. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Writings by the prominent journalist-turned-terrorist, Gemany's icon of revolutionary violence in the 1970s.

Synopsis:

No other figure embodies revolutionary politics and radical chic quite like Ulrike Meinhof, who formed, with Andreas Baader and Gudrun Ensslin, the Red Army Faction (RAF), also known as the Baader-Meinhof Gang, notorious for its bombings and kidnappings of the wealthy in the 1970s. But in the years leading up to her leap into the fray, Meinhof was known throughout Europe as a respected journalist, who informed and entertained her loyal readers with monthly magazine columns.

What impels someone to abandon middle-class privilege for the sake of revolution? In the 1960s, Meinhof began to see the world in increasingly stark terms: the United States was emerging as an unstoppable superpower, massacring a tiny country overseas despite increasingly popular dissent at home; and Germany appeared to be run by former Nazis. Never before translated into English, Meinhof's writings show a woman increasingly engaged in the major political events and social currents of her time. In her introduction, Karin Bauer tells Meinhof's mesmerizing life story and her political coming-of-age; Nobel Prize-winning author Elfriede Jelinek provides a thoughtful reflection on Meinhof's tragic failure to be heard; and Meinhof s daughter—a relentless critic of her mother and of the Left—contributes an afterword that shows how Meinhof's ghost still haunts us today.

About the Author

One of the most influential journalists of the German left in the 1960s. Becoming increasingly politicized, she left her family and aided in the escape of Andreas Baader, incarcerated for setting off a bomb in a department store. They founded the Red Army Faction and advocated revolutionary change by any means. She was found dead in her prison cell 1976.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781583228319
Author:
Meinhof, Ulrike
Publisher:
Seven Stories Press
Preface by:
Jelinek, Elfriede
Preface:
Jelinek, Elfriede
Editor:
Bauer, Karin
Author:
Von Flotow, Luise
Author:
Jelinek, Elfriede
Author:
Rohl, Bettina
Author:
Meinhof, Ulrike Hanna
Author:
Luise von Flotow
Author:
Meinhof, Ulrike Hanna, Professor
Author:
Bauer, Karin
Subject:
Europe - Germany
Subject:
Germany
Subject:
Politics and government
Subject:
Germany (west)
Subject:
History & Theory - Radical Thought
Subject:
Germany (West) Politics and government.
Subject:
Meinhof, Ulrike Marie
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20080631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 B&W illustrations
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.3 x 5.5 x 0.8 in 9.5 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Family Circle: The Boudins and the... Used Hardcover $4.50
  2. Crazy Horse (New Edition): The... Used Trade Paper $10.50
  3. John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man... Used Hardcover $10.50

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Pharmacology
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
History and Social Science » Journalism » Journalists
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » Germany » General

Everybody Talks about the Weather . . . We Don't: The Writings of Ulrike Meinhof New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Seven Stories Press - English 9781583228319 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Writings by the prominent journalist-turned-terrorist, Gemany's icon of revolutionary violence in the 1970s.
"Synopsis" by , No other figure embodies revolutionary politics and radical chic quite like Ulrike Meinhof, who formed, with Andreas Baader and Gudrun Ensslin, the Red Army Faction (RAF), also known as the Baader-Meinhof Gang, notorious for its bombings and kidnappings of the wealthy in the 1970s. But in the years leading up to her leap into the fray, Meinhof was known throughout Europe as a respected journalist, who informed and entertained her loyal readers with monthly magazine columns.

What impels someone to abandon middle-class privilege for the sake of revolution? In the 1960s, Meinhof began to see the world in increasingly stark terms: the United States was emerging as an unstoppable superpower, massacring a tiny country overseas despite increasingly popular dissent at home; and Germany appeared to be run by former Nazis. Never before translated into English, Meinhof's writings show a woman increasingly engaged in the major political events and social currents of her time. In her introduction, Karin Bauer tells Meinhof's mesmerizing life story and her political coming-of-age; Nobel Prize-winning author Elfriede Jelinek provides a thoughtful reflection on Meinhof's tragic failure to be heard; and Meinhof s daughter—a relentless critic of her mother and of the Left—contributes an afterword that shows how Meinhof's ghost still haunts us today.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.