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Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America and American in Iran

by

Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America and American in Iran Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

As far back as she can remember, Azadeh Moaveni has felt at odds with her tangled identity as an Iranian-American. In suburban America, Azadeh lived in two worlds. At home, she was the daughter of the Iranian exile community, serving tea, clinging to tradition, and dreaming of Tehran. Outside, she was a California girl who practiced yoga and listened to Madonna. For years, she ignored the tense standoff between her two cultures. But college magnified the clash between Iran and America, and after graduating, she moved to Iran as a journalist. This is the story of her search for identity, between two cultures cleaved apart by a violent history. It is also the story of Iran, a restive land lost in the twilight of its revolution.

Moaveni's homecoming falls in the heady days of the country's reform movement, when young people demonstrated in the streets and shouted for the Islamic regime to end. In these tumultuous times, she struggles to build a life in a dark country, wholly unlike the luminous, saffron and turquoise-tinted Iran of her imagination.

Review:

"Time reporter Moaveni, the American-born child of Iranian exiles, spent two years (2000 — 2001) working in Tehran. Although she reports on the overall tumult and repression felt by Iranians between the 1999 pro-democracy student demonstrations and the 2002 'Axis of Evil' declaration, the book's dominant story is more intimate. Moaveni was on a personal search 'to figure out my relationship' to Iran. Neither her adolescent ethnic identity conundrums nor her idyllic memories of a childhood visit prepared her for the realities she confronted as she navigated Iran, learning its rules, restrictions and taboos — and how to evade and even exploit them like a local. Because she was a journalist, the shadowy, unnerving presence of an Iranian intelligence agent/interrogator hovered continually ('it would be useful if we saw your work before publication,' he told her). Readers also get intimate glimpses of domestic life: Moaveni lived among family and depicts clandestine partying, women's gyms and the popularity of cosmetic surgery. Eventually, Moaveni became 'more at home than [her mother] was' in Iran, and a visit to the U.S. showed how Moaveni, who now lives in Beirut, had grown unaccustomed to American life, 'where my Iranian instincts served no purpose.' Lipstick Jihad is a catchy title, but its flippancy does a disservice to Moaveni's nuanced narrative. Agent, Diana Finch. (Mar.) Forecast: This work, as well as Afschineh Latifi's Even After All This Time, reviewed above, joins the recent explosion of memoirs by women about living in Iran, and could be displayed alongside Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, Roya Hakakian's Journey from the Land of No and Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The author's account of trying, on the one hand, to be a foreign reporter under a theocratic regime, and, on the other, a normal young woman with a career and family and her own apartment, is beautifully nuanced, complex, and illuminating....A must." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"In her compelling new memoir, Lipstick Jihad, Azadeh Moaveni gives the reader a guided tour through the underground youth culture in Tehran." Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

About the Author

Azadeh Moaveni grew up in San Jose and studied politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She won a Fulbright fellowship to Egypt, and studied Arabic at the American University in Cairo. For three years she worked across the Middle East as a reporter for Time magazine, before joining the Los Angeles Times to cover the war in Iraq. She lives in Beirut.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781586481933
Subtitle:
A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America and American in Iran
Author:
Moaveni, Azadeh
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Subject:
Minority Studies - Ethnic American
Subject:
Middle East - Iran
Subject:
Social conditions
Subject:
Iran
Subject:
Ethnic Cultures - General
Subject:
Middle East
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20050301
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in 19.50 oz

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Related Subjects

» Biography » General
» History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
» History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Middle Eastern American

Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America and American in Iran Used Hardcover
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Product details 320 pages PublicAffairs - English 9781586481933 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Time reporter Moaveni, the American-born child of Iranian exiles, spent two years (2000 — 2001) working in Tehran. Although she reports on the overall tumult and repression felt by Iranians between the 1999 pro-democracy student demonstrations and the 2002 'Axis of Evil' declaration, the book's dominant story is more intimate. Moaveni was on a personal search 'to figure out my relationship' to Iran. Neither her adolescent ethnic identity conundrums nor her idyllic memories of a childhood visit prepared her for the realities she confronted as she navigated Iran, learning its rules, restrictions and taboos — and how to evade and even exploit them like a local. Because she was a journalist, the shadowy, unnerving presence of an Iranian intelligence agent/interrogator hovered continually ('it would be useful if we saw your work before publication,' he told her). Readers also get intimate glimpses of domestic life: Moaveni lived among family and depicts clandestine partying, women's gyms and the popularity of cosmetic surgery. Eventually, Moaveni became 'more at home than [her mother] was' in Iran, and a visit to the U.S. showed how Moaveni, who now lives in Beirut, had grown unaccustomed to American life, 'where my Iranian instincts served no purpose.' Lipstick Jihad is a catchy title, but its flippancy does a disservice to Moaveni's nuanced narrative. Agent, Diana Finch. (Mar.) Forecast: This work, as well as Afschineh Latifi's Even After All This Time, reviewed above, joins the recent explosion of memoirs by women about living in Iran, and could be displayed alongside Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, Roya Hakakian's Journey from the Land of No and Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "The author's account of trying, on the one hand, to be a foreign reporter under a theocratic regime, and, on the other, a normal young woman with a career and family and her own apartment, is beautifully nuanced, complex, and illuminating....A must."
"Review" by , "In her compelling new memoir, Lipstick Jihad, Azadeh Moaveni gives the reader a guided tour through the underground youth culture in Tehran."
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