Mega Dose
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 18, 2014

Lin Enger: IMG Knowing vs. Knowing



On a hot July evening years ago, my Toyota Tercel overheated on a flat stretch of highway north of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A steam geyser shot up from... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
List price: $14.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Hawthorne Music- Rock Biography

Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads

by

Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"There has been much written about Bob Dylan, and even more as of late. But it seems that Dylan is large enough to sustain any number of books and theses and worshipful riffs, and so into this flood of words comes Greil Marcus' Like a Rolling Stone. Marcus — cultural critic, master of digression — wisely skirts worship, while remaining full of awe, going for the whole culture by way of a single song." Anna Godbersen, Esquire (read the entire Esquire review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Greil Marcus saw Bob Dylan for the first time in a New Jersey field in 1963. He didn't know the name of the scruffy singer who had a bit part in a Joan Baez concert, but he knew his performance was unique. So began a dedicated and enduring relationship between America's finest critic of popular music — "simply peerless," in Nick Hornby's words, "not only as a rock writer but as a cultural historian" — and Bob Dylan. In Like A Rolling Stone Marcus locates Dylan's six-minute masterwork in its richest, fullest context, capturing the heady atmosphere of the recording studio in 1965 as musicians and technicians clustered around the mercurial genius from Minnesota, the young Bob Dylan at the height of his powers.

But Marcus shows how, far from being a song only of 1965, "Like a Rolling Stone" is rooted in faraway American places and times, drawing on timeless cultural impulses that make the song as challenging, disruptive, and restless today as it ever was, capable of reinvention by artists as disparate as the comedian Richard Belzer and the Italian hip-hop duo Articolo 31. "Like a Rolling Stone" never loses its essential quality, which is directly to challenge the listener: it remains a call to arms and a demand for a better world. Forty years later it is still revolutionary as will and idea, as an attack and an embrace. How does it feel? In this unique, burningly intense book, Marcus tells you, and much more besides.

Review:

"Marcus's engaging exegesis on the musical and cultural ramifications of Dylan's 1965 six-and-half-minute hit is not just a study of a popular song and a historic era, but an examination of the heroic status of the American visionary artist. Recorded when American popular music was 'like a running election,' Dylan's 'music of transformations' induced a conflicted, confused America to look at its social disasters of racism, drug abuse and Vietnam, Marcus says, while simultaneously permitting it to strip away its illusions and hope for a better future. Ostensibly about a rich young socialite's fall from grace, the song's lyrics are open to many interpretations, which may have helped make it such a phenomenon. Marcus displays a comprehensive knowledge of American popular and political history, tracing the song's roots back to Robert Johnson and Hank Williams and spotting its influence on such disparate artists as Frank Zappa, the Village People and various contestants on American Idol. Part scholarly discourse and part beatnik rambling, the book is chockfull of lively metaphors and includes 20 pages of studio outtake banter. Marcus successfully convinces readers that (in the words of hit songwriter Gerry Goffin), 'Dylan managed to do something that not one of us was able to do: put poetry in rock n' roll and just stand up there like a mensch and sing it.' Agent, Wendy Weil. (Apr.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"On the history and reverberations of the music...Marcus is near the top of the game. How does it feel? Pretty good, most of the time." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Like a Rolling Stone is Marcus at his companionable best." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"Marcus' vast understanding of American culture and intimate knowledge of Dylan's career make this an eye-opening read." Booklist

Synopsis:

For the fortieth anniversary of the recording of "Like a Rolling Stone," the definitive biography of the song that caught the questing spirit of its time and overnight changed the rules of the possible in popular music for all time.

Synopsis:

Stanley Booth, a member of the Rolling Stones inner circle, met the band just a few months before Brian Jones drowned in a swimming pool in 1968. He lived with them throughout their 1969 tour across the United States, staying up all night together listening to blues, talking about music, ingesting drugs, and consorting with groupies. His thrilling account culminates with their final concert at Altamont Speedway—a nightmare of beating, stabbing, and killing that would signal the end of a generations dreams of peace and freedom. But while this book renders in fine detail the entire history of the Stones, paying special attention to the tragedy of Brian Jones, it is about much more than a writer and a rock band. It has been called—by Harold Brodkey and Robert Stone, among others—the best book ever written about the 1960s. In Booths afterword, he finally explains why it took him 15 years to write the book, relating an astonishing story of drugs, jails, and disasters. Updated to include a foreword by Greil Marcus, this 30th anniversary edition is for Rolling Stones fans everywhere.

Synopsis:

The preeminent musicologist and prolific author presents a rhapsodic appreciation of his and Bob Dylan's favorite song--one that defined an era but has, remained timeless in its originality and power.

About the Author

Greil Marcus is the author of Mystery Train, Lipstick Traces, Dead Elvis, In the Fascist Bathroom, The Dustbin of History, The Old, Weird America and Double Trouble. He has written for numerous publications, among them the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Threepenny Review, Artforum, Esquire, the Los Angeles Times, Salon, and Granta. In 2000 and 2002 he taught at Berkeley and Princeton, and he currently lectures in the U.S. and Europe. He lives in Berkeley, California.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781586483821
Author:
Marcus, Greil
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Author:
Marcus, Greil
Author:
Booth, Stanley
Subject:
Composers & Musicians - Country & Folk
Subject:
Dylan, Bob
Subject:
History & Criticism - General
Subject:
General Music
Subject:
Dylan, Bob - Criticism and interpretation
Subject:
Music -- History and criticism.
Subject:
History & Criticism *
Subject:
Composers & Musicians
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Thirtieth Edition, 30th Anniversary Edition
Publication Date:
20060431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 11.8 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Tupac Shakur Legacy Used Hardcover $32.00
  2. Bound for Glory: The Hard-Driving,...
    Used Trade Paper $8.95
  3. The Rose and the Briar: Death, Love... Used Hardcover $9.95
  4. Rockin' in Time: A Social History of... Used Trade Paper $12.50
  5. The Rolling Stones: 365 Days Used Hardcover $10.95
  6. Catch a Fire :Bob Marley Definitive... Used Trade Paper $4.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock » Biographies
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
Biography » General

Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 416 pages PublicAffairs - English 9781586483821 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Marcus's engaging exegesis on the musical and cultural ramifications of Dylan's 1965 six-and-half-minute hit is not just a study of a popular song and a historic era, but an examination of the heroic status of the American visionary artist. Recorded when American popular music was 'like a running election,' Dylan's 'music of transformations' induced a conflicted, confused America to look at its social disasters of racism, drug abuse and Vietnam, Marcus says, while simultaneously permitting it to strip away its illusions and hope for a better future. Ostensibly about a rich young socialite's fall from grace, the song's lyrics are open to many interpretations, which may have helped make it such a phenomenon. Marcus displays a comprehensive knowledge of American popular and political history, tracing the song's roots back to Robert Johnson and Hank Williams and spotting its influence on such disparate artists as Frank Zappa, the Village People and various contestants on American Idol. Part scholarly discourse and part beatnik rambling, the book is chockfull of lively metaphors and includes 20 pages of studio outtake banter. Marcus successfully convinces readers that (in the words of hit songwriter Gerry Goffin), 'Dylan managed to do something that not one of us was able to do: put poetry in rock n' roll and just stand up there like a mensch and sing it.' Agent, Wendy Weil. (Apr.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "There has been much written about Bob Dylan, and even more as of late. But it seems that Dylan is large enough to sustain any number of books and theses and worshipful riffs, and so into this flood of words comes Greil Marcus' Like a Rolling Stone. Marcus — cultural critic, master of digression — wisely skirts worship, while remaining full of awe, going for the whole culture by way of a single song." (read the entire Esquire review)
"Review" by , "On the history and reverberations of the music...Marcus is near the top of the game. How does it feel? Pretty good, most of the time."
"Review" by , "Like a Rolling Stone is Marcus at his companionable best."
"Review" by , "Marcus' vast understanding of American culture and intimate knowledge of Dylan's career make this an eye-opening read."
"Synopsis" by ,
For the fortieth anniversary of the recording of "Like a Rolling Stone," the definitive biography of the song that caught the questing spirit of its time and overnight changed the rules of the possible in popular music for all time.
"Synopsis" by ,

Stanley Booth, a member of the Rolling Stones inner circle, met the band just a few months before Brian Jones drowned in a swimming pool in 1968. He lived with them throughout their 1969 tour across the United States, staying up all night together listening to blues, talking about music, ingesting drugs, and consorting with groupies. His thrilling account culminates with their final concert at Altamont Speedway—a nightmare of beating, stabbing, and killing that would signal the end of a generations dreams of peace and freedom. But while this book renders in fine detail the entire history of the Stones, paying special attention to the tragedy of Brian Jones, it is about much more than a writer and a rock band. It has been called—by Harold Brodkey and Robert Stone, among others—the best book ever written about the 1960s. In Booths afterword, he finally explains why it took him 15 years to write the book, relating an astonishing story of drugs, jails, and disasters. Updated to include a foreword by Greil Marcus, this 30th anniversary edition is for Rolling Stones fans everywhere.

"Synopsis" by , The preeminent musicologist and prolific author presents a rhapsodic appreciation of his and Bob Dylan's favorite song--one that defined an era but has, remained timeless in its originality and power.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.