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Three Guys from Miami Cook Cuban

by and and

Three Guys from Miami Cook Cuban Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Take three self-described "guys," three marriages, a mingling of cultures, and a 20-year love affair with all things Cuban, and you have a recipe for a great new Cuban cookbook.

Three Guys from Miami Cook Cuban is the latest effort of Glenn Lindgren, Raúl Musibay, and Jorge Castillo ? three brothers-in-law with a passion for Cuban food and culture. Their website, iCuban.com: The Internet Cuban has attracted millions of visitors since they created it in 1996. The trio has made several appearances on the Food Network and they are frequent sources of Cuban cooking tips and advice for professional chefs and amateur cooks all over the world.

The Three Guys from Miami quickly became known for their great parties, centered around whole pigroasts or an elaborate Cuban-style paella. In fact, the Three Guys' "Paella Cubana" was featured on an episode of "Tyler's Ultimate" with Tyler Florence on the Food Network.

Latin food and Cuban food in particular, is experiencing a new renaissance in the around the world. Hardcore "Foodies" are always on the lookout for the latest ethnic taste sensation, and Cuban cuisine is a great change of pace from Italian or Asian food. Whether on a trip to South Florida and the Keys, or a visit to Gloria Estefan's Bongo's Café in DisneyWorld, people from all over the world are getting to know and love great Cuban food.

Three Guys from Miami Cook Cuban is a fun, and easy-to-follow guide that will let even inexperienced home cooks turn out some great Cuban meals. The recipes are easy to prepare and you'll actually enjoy the entire process. The book is laced with plenty of Three Guys' humor and a running commentary.

The Three Guys recipes represent three lifetimes of enjoying Cuban food, and a long process creating, collecting, and refining the recipes they love. Their book is a synthesis of many recipes, recipe ideas, and cooking tips they have received from Cubans (and Cuban food lovers) all over the world. They have combined the best ideas from these great chefs with their own special twists to create the "tried and true" recipes they like best.

From the Inside Flap

From simple Cuban fare like frijoles and tamales, to elaborate dishes like a rich, seafood-packed paella, this hot recipe book is packed with Miami Cuban spice and local color. If you can't get to Miami for a Cuban sandwich, the next best thing is making your own-or maybe it's even better. One thing is certain: the Three Guys will make the experience both fun and memorable.

Enter the sensational world of Cuban cuisine, which blends the spices of Spain, the tropical tastes of the Caribbean, a strong African influence, and some new-world spices to boot. You don't have to be a professional cook to make these extraordinary recipes, and you definitely don't need to be Cuban to cook and eat them. But don't be surprised if you develop a yen to visit the Cuban neighborhoods of Miami as you savor the mouth-watering flavors of Cuban cooking.

The recipes in this book represent twenty years of experimentation, refinement, and a lot of trial and error to make them uniquely their own. Many of the recipes were created "from scratch" by the Three Guys after enjoying a meal at a restaurant and trying to duplicate it in their own kitchens. Some are long-time family favorites from Cuba, re-interpreted to take advantage of the abundance of food and ingredients in Miami. All the recipes include a special ingredient: a heaping tablespoon of humor. As the Three Guys say, "If we're not having fun in the kitchen, we're not doing anything in the kitchen!"

The Three Guys From Miami are all brothers-in-law. Brought together by fate, they became fast friends who share a passion for good food, good conversation, and a great party. Three Guys from Miami have appeared on Keith Famie's Adventures, and on Tyler's Ultimate, and in Christmas in America — all on the Food Network. Your kids may recognize them as "Mariel's dad" and "Mariel's uncle" on two episodes of Switched on the ABC Family channel!

Review:

"This cookbook boasts solid renditions of Cuban dishes, but readers will have to suffer through the cheesy repartee among its three authors, who have a Cuban culture Web site, www.iCuban.com. A brief introduction entices with information about Cuban migration to Miami, but margin notes to the recipes tend toward repetitious and obvious exchanges. A recipe for Fried Stuffed Potatoes, for example, begins with Ral commenting, 'This is one Cuban snack that if you haven't tried, you probably don't know what in the heck it is.' Still, the food itself is alluring. Avocado and Pineapple Salad is refreshingly unusual, and marinating Cuban-Style Skirt Steak in a mix of onion, herbs and sour orange juice before grilling delivers maximum flavor with minimal work. The authors nicely cover savory snacks like Cornmeal Pancakes, numerous types of empanadas, and Plantain Chips. They also remain true to authentic Cuban cuisine by not skimping on the frying, though fat-phobic Americans will probably avoid the Fried Pork Chunks. Occasionally the recipes slip into a cutesy tone (one for Cuban Bread cheerleads, 'it's a little sticky, but you can do it!' then begins a later step with, 'When you return from the pool...'). Overall, this effort stands out less because of its appeal than because it has so few competitors." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"[The] 'three guys'...have an immensely popular web site, iCuban.com, devoted to Cuban food and culture. In their first book, they present many of their favorite recipes and stories....[and] a lot of culinary and social history... strongly recommended." Library Journal

Review:

"These fellows are funny....The website was [originally] simply something fun to do among friends with a passion for succulent eating — a.k.a. lovers of family gatherings around a pig in a pit, of pounds and pounds of salmon on the grill, of thick frijoles negros bien cuajaditos (black beans of impeccable consistency), of the mashed plantain dish fufú." Miami Herald

Review:

"With Colombian arepas and Nicaraguan tres leches in the mix, the title might more accurately be 'Three Guys...Cook Miami,' but there are plenty of Cuban standards here....Best of all, we get the good-natured byplay...that makes these guys such good company." Miami Herald

Review:

"...there aren't too many Cuban cookbooks around as of yet, and this one is very accessible. The authors are on the Food Network too. And they even tell you how to make that devastating Cuban coffee." The Buffalo News

Review:

"My choice for the 'I want to try something new' cookbook is Three Guys From Miami Cook Cuban. This is the first cookbook by the Three Guys...[You'll]find recipes for the Cuban Sandwich, Papa Rellena (fried stuffed potatoes), Empanadas (with a variety of stuffings) and Paella...and a sort of running (and often funny) commentary on the recipes and Cuban culture." The Commercial Appeal

Review:

"This is their first cookbook. It won't be their last. The desserts are scrumptious, but rich, rich, rich. These three guys are the kind of zanies that make the world go 'round. Pass the tres leche cake, please." Las Vegas Sun

Synopsis:

Meet the Three Guys From Miami — three hombres who love Cuban culture and food so much that they started and continue to maintain the tremendously popular website iCuban.com: The Internet Cuban. Millions of people have already discovered these Three Guys and their recipes — and now the rest of world can too! Enter the sensational world of Cuban cuisine, which blends the spices of Spain, the tropical tastes of the Caribbean, a strong African influence, and some New World spices to boot. You don't have to be a professional cook to make these extraordinary recipes, and you definitely don't need to be Cuban to cook and eat them!

Synopsis:

Are you are new to Cuban cuisine? If so, then you are about to enter an exciting world of flavor. Cuban cooking combines the tastes of Spain with the tropical flavors of the Caribbean. Throw in some New World spices and ingredients and a strong African influence and you have the essence of Cuban cookery.

These recipes also reflect ingredients and methods that were refined by Cuban exiles after they came to the United States. Here they found an abundance of foods that were either very scarce or completely unavailable in Castro's Cuba. Fish and seafood are two examples of foods that were only rarely enjoyed in Cuba after 1959. It was also impossible to get real olive oil-an ingredient that gives so many Cuban dishes a distinctive Latin flavor. Exile in the U.S. also exposed Cubans to ingredients they never saw in Havana. Salmon is very popular with Miami Cubans, for example, but unheard of in Cuba.

Synopsis:

If you are one of the more that two million people who have visited the web site at iCuban.com: The Internet Cuban, you already know who these Three Guys are. If you are one of the more than six billion people alive today who have not, a little explanation is in order. They are Three Guys From MiamiTM who share a passion for good food, good conversation, and a great party.

Are you are new to Cuban cuisine? If so, then you are about to enter an exciting world of flavor. Cuban cooking combines the tastes of Spain with the tropical flavors of the Caribbean. Throw in some New World spices and ingredients and a strong African influence and you have the essence of Cuban cookery.

These recipes also reflect ingredients and methods that were refined by Cuban exiles after they came to the United States. Here they found an abundance of foods that were either very scarce or completely unavailable in Castro's Cuba. Fish and seafood are two examples of foods that were only rarely enjoyed in Cuba after 1959. It was also impossible to get real olive oil-an ingredient that gives so many Cuban dishes a distinctive Latin flavor. Exile in the U.S. also exposed Cubans to ingredients they never saw in Havana. Salmon is very popular with Miami Cubans, for example, but unheard of in Cuba.

Wherever possible the Three Guys have made these dishes simple to prepare. You don't need to be a professional chef to create any of the recipes in this book. Best of all, you don't need to be Cuban to cook and enjoy them. If a Swedish guy from Minnesota can cook Cuban food (and he does it very well), you can too

They have madge several appearances on the Food Network.

Glenn Lindgren first came to Miami in 1984 and fell in love with the city, the people, and the Cuban culture. A freelance writer by profession, Glenn documents the antics of the Three Guys From Miami in books and on the Internet. When not in Miami, Glenn and his wife live in Minnesota with their son and two daughters.

Raul Musibay, born in Cayo la Rosa, near Bauta, in the province of Havana, spent one winter in New Jersey but has been a full-time Miami resident ever since. He is the manager of the Red Bird Amoco station there. He and his wife have two married children.

Jorge Castillo was born and raised in Cayo la Rosa, Havana. He came to the United States via the Mariel Boatlift in 1980, then left Miami after three months to live in Iowa, where he became a respiratory therapist. Now the regional sales manager for a major medical products company, he makes his home in Miami's West Dade with his wife and two daughters.

About the Author

The Three Guys From Miami are all brothers-in-law. Brought together by fate, they became fast friends who share a passion for good food, good conversation, and a great party.

Glenn Lindgren first came to Miami in 1984 and fell in love with the city, the people, and Cuban culture. A freelance writer by profession, Glenn documents the antics of the Three Guys from Miami in books and on the Internet. When not in Miami, Glenn lives in Minnesota with his wife, two daughters, and a son.

Raúl Musibay, born in Cayo la Rosa, near Bauta, in the province of Havana, spent one winter in New Jersey but has been a full-time Miami resident every since. He and his wife have two married children.

Jorge Castillo was born and raised in Cayo la Rosa, Havana. He came to the United States via the Mariel Boatlift in 1980. He now lives in Miami's West Dade with his wife and two daughters.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781586854331
Publisher:
Gibbs Smith Publishers
Location:
Salt Lake City
Author:
Castillo, Jorge
Author:
Musibay, Raul
Author:
Lindgren, Glenn M.
Subject:
Cookery, cuban
Subject:
Regional & Ethnic - Caribbean & West Indian
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Latin American and Caribbean
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series:
Three Guys from Miami
Series Volume:
239
Publication Date:
20041131
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
234
Dimensions:
900x1200

Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Regional and Ethnic » Latin American and Caribbean
Cooking and Food » Regional and Ethnic » United States » Ethnic

Three Guys from Miami Cook Cuban
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 234 pages Gibbs Smith Publishers - English 9781586854331 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This cookbook boasts solid renditions of Cuban dishes, but readers will have to suffer through the cheesy repartee among its three authors, who have a Cuban culture Web site, www.iCuban.com. A brief introduction entices with information about Cuban migration to Miami, but margin notes to the recipes tend toward repetitious and obvious exchanges. A recipe for Fried Stuffed Potatoes, for example, begins with Ral commenting, 'This is one Cuban snack that if you haven't tried, you probably don't know what in the heck it is.' Still, the food itself is alluring. Avocado and Pineapple Salad is refreshingly unusual, and marinating Cuban-Style Skirt Steak in a mix of onion, herbs and sour orange juice before grilling delivers maximum flavor with minimal work. The authors nicely cover savory snacks like Cornmeal Pancakes, numerous types of empanadas, and Plantain Chips. They also remain true to authentic Cuban cuisine by not skimping on the frying, though fat-phobic Americans will probably avoid the Fried Pork Chunks. Occasionally the recipes slip into a cutesy tone (one for Cuban Bread cheerleads, 'it's a little sticky, but you can do it!' then begins a later step with, 'When you return from the pool...'). Overall, this effort stands out less because of its appeal than because it has so few competitors." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[The] 'three guys'...have an immensely popular web site, iCuban.com, devoted to Cuban food and culture. In their first book, they present many of their favorite recipes and stories....[and] a lot of culinary and social history... strongly recommended."
"Review" by , "These fellows are funny....The website was [originally] simply something fun to do among friends with a passion for succulent eating — a.k.a. lovers of family gatherings around a pig in a pit, of pounds and pounds of salmon on the grill, of thick frijoles negros bien cuajaditos (black beans of impeccable consistency), of the mashed plantain dish fufú."
"Review" by , "With Colombian arepas and Nicaraguan tres leches in the mix, the title might more accurately be 'Three Guys...Cook Miami,' but there are plenty of Cuban standards here....Best of all, we get the good-natured byplay...that makes these guys such good company."
"Review" by , "...there aren't too many Cuban cookbooks around as of yet, and this one is very accessible. The authors are on the Food Network too. And they even tell you how to make that devastating Cuban coffee."
"Review" by , "My choice for the 'I want to try something new' cookbook is Three Guys From Miami Cook Cuban. This is the first cookbook by the Three Guys...[You'll]find recipes for the Cuban Sandwich, Papa Rellena (fried stuffed potatoes), Empanadas (with a variety of stuffings) and Paella...and a sort of running (and often funny) commentary on the recipes and Cuban culture."
"Review" by , "This is their first cookbook. It won't be their last. The desserts are scrumptious, but rich, rich, rich. These three guys are the kind of zanies that make the world go 'round. Pass the tres leche cake, please."
"Synopsis" by , Meet the Three Guys From Miami — three hombres who love Cuban culture and food so much that they started and continue to maintain the tremendously popular website iCuban.com: The Internet Cuban. Millions of people have already discovered these Three Guys and their recipes — and now the rest of world can too! Enter the sensational world of Cuban cuisine, which blends the spices of Spain, the tropical tastes of the Caribbean, a strong African influence, and some New World spices to boot. You don't have to be a professional cook to make these extraordinary recipes, and you definitely don't need to be Cuban to cook and eat them!
"Synopsis" by , Are you are new to Cuban cuisine? If so, then you are about to enter an exciting world of flavor. Cuban cooking combines the tastes of Spain with the tropical flavors of the Caribbean. Throw in some New World spices and ingredients and a strong African influence and you have the essence of Cuban cookery.

These recipes also reflect ingredients and methods that were refined by Cuban exiles after they came to the United States. Here they found an abundance of foods that were either very scarce or completely unavailable in Castro's Cuba. Fish and seafood are two examples of foods that were only rarely enjoyed in Cuba after 1959. It was also impossible to get real olive oil-an ingredient that gives so many Cuban dishes a distinctive Latin flavor. Exile in the U.S. also exposed Cubans to ingredients they never saw in Havana. Salmon is very popular with Miami Cubans, for example, but unheard of in Cuba.

"Synopsis" by , If you are one of the more that two million people who have visited the web site at iCuban.com: The Internet Cuban, you already know who these Three Guys are. If you are one of the more than six billion people alive today who have not, a little explanation is in order. They are Three Guys From MiamiTM who share a passion for good food, good conversation, and a great party.

Are you are new to Cuban cuisine? If so, then you are about to enter an exciting world of flavor. Cuban cooking combines the tastes of Spain with the tropical flavors of the Caribbean. Throw in some New World spices and ingredients and a strong African influence and you have the essence of Cuban cookery.

These recipes also reflect ingredients and methods that were refined by Cuban exiles after they came to the United States. Here they found an abundance of foods that were either very scarce or completely unavailable in Castro's Cuba. Fish and seafood are two examples of foods that were only rarely enjoyed in Cuba after 1959. It was also impossible to get real olive oil-an ingredient that gives so many Cuban dishes a distinctive Latin flavor. Exile in the U.S. also exposed Cubans to ingredients they never saw in Havana. Salmon is very popular with Miami Cubans, for example, but unheard of in Cuba.

Wherever possible the Three Guys have made these dishes simple to prepare. You don't need to be a professional chef to create any of the recipes in this book. Best of all, you don't need to be Cuban to cook and enjoy them. If a Swedish guy from Minnesota can cook Cuban food (and he does it very well), you can too

They have madge several appearances on the Food Network.

Glenn Lindgren first came to Miami in 1984 and fell in love with the city, the people, and the Cuban culture. A freelance writer by profession, Glenn documents the antics of the Three Guys From Miami in books and on the Internet. When not in Miami, Glenn and his wife live in Minnesota with their son and two daughters.

Raul Musibay, born in Cayo la Rosa, near Bauta, in the province of Havana, spent one winter in New Jersey but has been a full-time Miami resident ever since. He is the manager of the Red Bird Amoco station there. He and his wife have two married children.

Jorge Castillo was born and raised in Cayo la Rosa, Havana. He came to the United States via the Mariel Boatlift in 1980, then left Miami after three months to live in Iowa, where he became a respiratory therapist. Now the regional sales manager for a major medical products company, he makes his home in Miami's West Dade with his wife and two daughters.

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