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D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths (New York Review Children's Collection)

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D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths (New York Review Children's Collection) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The New York Review Children's Collection began in 2003 in an attempt to reward readers who have long wished for the return of their favorite children’s titles and to introduce those books to a new generation. The line publishes picture books for preschoolers through to chapter books and novels for older children. Praised for their elegant design and sturdy bindings, these books set a new standard for the definition of a "classic."

 

Among the 52 titles included in this collection you will find Esther Averill's time-honored Jenny and the Cat Club series; several titles by the award-winning team of Ingri and Edgar Parin d'Aulaire, including their Book of Norse Myths and Book of Animals; James Thurber's The Thirteen Clocks and The Wonderful O, both with illustrations by Marc Simont; Daniel Pinkwater’s weird and wacky Lizard Music; Alison Uttley’s time-travel classic A Traveller in Time; and Palmer Brown’s intricately illustrated books Beyond the Pawpaw Trees and holiday favorite Something for Christmas.

 

The New York Review Children's Collection brings time-tested children's and young adult literature to your bookshelf in sturdy, well-crafted hardback editions designed to last for generations. The covers feature a unified series design by award-winning designer Louise Fili and all interior materials are carefully selected to reflect the period of original publication. Each book has a three-piece, paper-over-board cover, cloth spine, and coordinating head- and foot-bands. All text is printed on acid-free paper stock and many titles include original endpapers, line art, and full-color illustrations.

 

This collection includes one each of the following titles:

 

Jenny and the Cat Club by Esther Averill

The Little Bookroom by Eleanor Farjeon

The Island of Horses by Eilis Dillon

The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay

Mistress Masham's Repose by T.H. White

The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater

Carbonel: The King of the Cats by Barbara Sleigh

An Episode of Sparrows by Rumer Godden

D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths by Ingri and Edgar Parin d'Aulaire

Jenny Goes to Sea by Esther Averill

Jenny's Birthday Book by Esther Averill

The Bear and the People by Reiner Zimnik

Jenny's Moonlight Adventure by Esther Averill

The School for Cats by Esther Averill

Captains of the City Streets by Esther Averill

The Hotel Cat by Esther Averill

Wee Gillis by Munro Leaf, Illustrations by Robert Lawson

The House of Arden by E. Nesbit

The Lost Island by Eilis Dillon

D'Aulaires' Book of Trolls by Ingri and Edgar Parin d'Aulaire

The Peterkin Papers by Lucretia P. Hale

Bel Ria by Sheila Burnford

Charlotte Sometimes by Penelope Farmer

Pecos Bill by James Cloyd Bowman, Illustrations by Laura Bannon

D'Aulaires' Book of Animals by Ingri and Edgar Parin d'Aulaire

Uncle by J. P. Martin, Illustrations by Quentin Blake

The Backward Day by Ruth Krauss, Illustrations by Marc Simont

The Two Cars by Ingri & Edgar Parin d'Aulaire

The Terrible Troll-Bird by Ingri d'Aulaire Edgar d'Aulaire

The Box of Delights by John Masefield

Foxie, The Singing Dog by Ingri and Edgar Parin d'Aulaire

Uncle Cleans Up by J. P. Martin

The 13 Clocks by James Thurber, Illustrations by Marc Simont

The Midnight Folk by John Masefield

Too Big by Ingri and Edgar Parin d'Aulaire

The Wonderful O by James Thurber, Illustrations by Marc Simont

The Mousewife by Rumer Godden, Illustrations by William Pene Du Bois

The Kingdom of Carbonel by Barbara Sleigh

Ounce Dice Trice by Alastair Reid, Illustrations by Ben Shahn

The Bear That Wasn’t by Frank Tashlin

Beyond the Pawpaw Trees by Palmer Brown

Carbonel and Calidor by Barbara Sleigh, Illustrations by Charles Front

Lizard Music by Daniel Pinkwater

The Man Who Lost His Head by Claire Hutchet Bishop, Illustrations by Robert McCloskey

Mud Pies and Other Recipes by Marjorie Winslow, Illustrations by Erik Blegvad

The Rescuers by Margary Sharp, Illustrations by Garth Williams

Something for Christmas by Palmer Brown

Sorely Trying Day by Russell Hoban, Illustrated by Lillian Hoban

Supposing…by Alistair Reid, Illustrations by Bob Gill

Terrible, Horrible Edie by E.C. Spykman

Three Ladies by the Sea by Rhoda Levine, Illustrations by Edward Gorey

A Traveller in Time by Alison Uttley

 

Synopsis:

US

Synopsis:

Ingri Mortenson and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire met at art school in Munich in 1921. Edgar’s father was a noted Italian portrait painter, his mother a Parisian. Ingri, the youngest of five children, traced her lineage back to the Viking kings.

The couple married in Norway, then moved to Paris. As Bohemian artists, they often talked about emigrating to America. “The enormous continent with all its possibilities and grandeur caught our imagination,” Edgar later recalled.

A small payment from a bus accident provided the means. Edgar sailed alone to New York where he earned enough by illustrating books to buy passage for his wife. Once there, Ingri painted portraits and hosted modest dinner parties. The head librarian of the New York Public Library’s juvenile department attended one of those. Why, she asked, didn’t they create picture books for children?

The d’Aulaires published their first children’s book in 1931. Next came three books steeped in the Scandinavian folklore of Ingri’s childhood. Then the couple turned their talents to the history of their new country. The result was a series of beautifully illustrated books about American heroes, one of which, Abraham Lincoln, won the d’Aulaires the American Library Association’s Caldecott Medal. Finally they turned to the realm of myths.

The d’Aulaires worked as a team on both art and text throughout their joint career. Originally, they used stone lithography for their illustrations. A single four-color illustration required four slabs of Bavarian limestone that weighed up to two hundred pounds apiece. The technique gave their illustrations an uncanny hand-drawn vibrancy. When, in the early 1960s, this process became too expensive, the d’Aulaires switched to acetate sheets which closely approximated the texture of lithographic stone.

In their nearly five-decade career, the d’Aulaires received high critical acclaim for their distinguished contributions to children’s literature. They were working on a new book when Ingri died in 1980 at the age of seventy-five. Edgar continued working until he died in 1985 at the age of eighty-six.

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and, most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

About the Author

Edgar Parin DAulaire (1898-1986) studied art in Germany and France, and worked with Henri Matisse. In Munich, he met Ingri Mortenson (1904-1980), a Norwegian-born art student. They married, emigrated to the US, and began a long career together, during which they published over twenty picture books for children. The Magic Rug was followed by Ola and East of the Sun and West of the Moon, both of which describe Norwegian folklore. Their work shifted to American history with Abraham Lincoln, a biography which won the 1940 Caldecott Medal. The dAulaires were awarded the Regina Medal from the Catholic Library Association in 1970.

Michael Chabon is the author of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and the childrens book, Summerland. He lives in Berkeley, California.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

bookmunchter, May 11, 2009 (view all comments by bookmunchter)
I found this book to be an enjoyable way to learn more about Norse mythology. There did seem to be a heavy christian influence on the renditions of some particular stories, mostly in the end of the book. This might even be appropriately so, for the spread of Christianity did in fact pave the road for the end of their viking ways.
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(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590171257
Preface:
Chabon, Michael
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Preface by:
Chabon, Michael
Preface:
Chabon, Michael
Introduction:
Chabon, Michael
Author:
Various
Author:
D'Aulaire, Edgar Parin
Author:
Chabon, Michael
Author:
D'Aulaire, Ingri
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Literature - Classics / Contemporary
Subject:
Mythology
Subject:
Legends, Myths, & Fables - Norse
Subject:
Mythology, norse
Subject:
JUVENILE FICTION / Legends, Myths, Fables/Norse
Subject:
Gods, Norse.
Subject:
Animals - Cats
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Fairy Tales & Folklore - Single Title
Copyright:
Series:
New York Review Children's Collection
Publication Date:
20050531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from K up to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
12 x 8.8 x 0.71 in 1.625 lb
Age Level:
04-UP

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Related Subjects

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D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths (New York Review Children's Collection) New Hardcover
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Product details 160 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590171257 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , US
"Synopsis" by , Ingri Mortenson and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire met at art school in Munich in 1921. Edgar’s father was a noted Italian portrait painter, his mother a Parisian. Ingri, the youngest of five children, traced her lineage back to the Viking kings.

The couple married in Norway, then moved to Paris. As Bohemian artists, they often talked about emigrating to America. “The enormous continent with all its possibilities and grandeur caught our imagination,” Edgar later recalled.

A small payment from a bus accident provided the means. Edgar sailed alone to New York where he earned enough by illustrating books to buy passage for his wife. Once there, Ingri painted portraits and hosted modest dinner parties. The head librarian of the New York Public Library’s juvenile department attended one of those. Why, she asked, didn’t they create picture books for children?

The d’Aulaires published their first children’s book in 1931. Next came three books steeped in the Scandinavian folklore of Ingri’s childhood. Then the couple turned their talents to the history of their new country. The result was a series of beautifully illustrated books about American heroes, one of which, Abraham Lincoln, won the d’Aulaires the American Library Association’s Caldecott Medal. Finally they turned to the realm of myths.

The d’Aulaires worked as a team on both art and text throughout their joint career. Originally, they used stone lithography for their illustrations. A single four-color illustration required four slabs of Bavarian limestone that weighed up to two hundred pounds apiece. The technique gave their illustrations an uncanny hand-drawn vibrancy. When, in the early 1960s, this process became too expensive, the d’Aulaires switched to acetate sheets which closely approximated the texture of lithographic stone.

In their nearly five-decade career, the d’Aulaires received high critical acclaim for their distinguished contributions to children’s literature. They were working on a new book when Ingri died in 1980 at the age of seventy-five. Edgar continued working until he died in 1985 at the age of eighty-six.

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and, most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

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