Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 20, 2014

Julie Schumacher: IMG Dear Professor Fitger



Saint Paul, August 2014 Dear Professor Fitger, I've been asked to say a few words about you for Powells.com. Having dreamed you up with a ball-point... Continue »
  1. $16.07 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Dear Committee Members

    Julie Schumacher 9780385538138

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$11.50
List price: $16.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside American Studies- General

This title in other editions

Masscult and Midcult: Essays Against the American Grain (New York Review Books Classics)

by

Masscult and Midcult: Essays Against the American Grain (New York Review Books Classics) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A New York Review Books Original

Political radical, trenchant essayist, and impresario of the New York intellectuals, Dwight Macdonald was one of the towering figures of twentieth-century American letters. In his most famous and controversial essay, "Masscult and Midcult", MacDonald turns his formidable critical attention to what he sees as a new, and potentially catastrophic, development in the history of Western civilization: the influence—by turns distorting, destructive, and inadvertently ridiculous—of mass culture on high culture. In this new collection of essays, ranging in subject matter from Ernest Hemingway, James Agee, and Tom Wolfe to Webster’s Dictionary and the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, Macdonald is shrewd, passionate, and bracingly alive to the complexities of his subject, which he defines as being “not the dead sea of masscult but rather the life of the tide line where higher and lower organisms compete for survival.”

Review:

"This collection brings together the most memorable writing by influential cultural and literary critic Macdonald. Written in 1960, the title essay argues that American middlebrow culture 'pretends to respect the standards of High Culture while in fact it waters them down and vulgarizes them.' Macdonald claims that artists like Norman Rockwell and magazines, such as Life and Time, that attempt to make art and culture appealing to a mass audience are 'degrading the serious rather than elevating the frivolous.' He feels similarly about the 1952 Revised Standard Version of the Bible that altered the poetic language to make the text more accessible. The 1961 third edition of Webster's New International Dictionary is taken to task for its all-inclusive approach to language, including slang and grammatical inaccuracies without qualifiers, such as 'colloquial' or 'erroneous.' In the final essay, Macdonald assails Tom Wolfe's shoddy approach to journalism, calling Wolfe's writing 'parajournalism' — a mixture of fact and fiction where 'entertainment, rather than information is the aim of its producers.' Macdonald was a brilliant and influential writer of his time; hopefully this new collection will introduce him to a new generation of readers. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A New York Review Books Original

An uncompromising contrarian, a passionate polemicist, a man of quick wit and wide learning, an anarchist, a pacifist, and a virtuoso of the slashing phrase, Dwight Macdonald was an indefatigable and indomitable critic of America’s susceptibility to well-meaning cultural fakery: all those estimable, eminent, prizewinning works of art that are said to be good and good for you and are not. He dubbed this phenomenon “Midcult” and he attacked it not only on aesthetic but on political grounds. Midcult rendered people complacent and compliant, secure in their common stupidity but neither happy nor free.

This new selection of Macdonald’s finest essays, assembled by John Summers, the editor of The Baffler, reintroduces a remarkable American critic and writer. In the era of smart, sexy, and everything indie, Macdonald remains as pertinent and challenging as ever.

About the Author

Dwight Macdonald (1906–1982) was an American writer, editor, critic, and political gadfly. A prominent member of the group known as the New York Intellectuals, he served as the editor of first Partisan Review and then his own journal, Politics. He later became a staff writer for The New Yorker, Esquire’s film critic, and a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books.

 

Louis Menand is the Robert M. and Anne T. Bass Professor of English and American Literature and Language at Harvard University, and a staff writer at The New Yorker.

 

John Summers is editor of The Baffler. He writes and lectures widely on American history and culture.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590174470
Author:
Macdonald, Dwight
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Author:
Summers, John
Author:
Menand, Louis
Author:
MacDonald, Dwight
Subject:
Sociology -- essays.
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20111031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
7.98 x 5 x 0.65 in 0.7 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Twenty Thousand Streets Under the... Used Trade Paper $8.95
  2. Van Gogh: The Life Used Trade Paper $17.50
  3. Heart of Darkness and the Secret...
    Used Mass Market $3.50
  4. Dishing Up Oregon: 145 Recipes That... Sale Trade Paper $9.98
  5. London Under: The Secret History... Sale Hardcover $9.98
  6. Listomania: A World of Fascinating...
    Sale Trade Paper $14.98

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Humanities
History and Social Science » American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Culture
History and Social Science » Social Science » Essays
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » Literary and Cultural Studies
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Evolution

Masscult and Midcult: Essays Against the American Grain (New York Review Books Classics) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590174470 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This collection brings together the most memorable writing by influential cultural and literary critic Macdonald. Written in 1960, the title essay argues that American middlebrow culture 'pretends to respect the standards of High Culture while in fact it waters them down and vulgarizes them.' Macdonald claims that artists like Norman Rockwell and magazines, such as Life and Time, that attempt to make art and culture appealing to a mass audience are 'degrading the serious rather than elevating the frivolous.' He feels similarly about the 1952 Revised Standard Version of the Bible that altered the poetic language to make the text more accessible. The 1961 third edition of Webster's New International Dictionary is taken to task for its all-inclusive approach to language, including slang and grammatical inaccuracies without qualifiers, such as 'colloquial' or 'erroneous.' In the final essay, Macdonald assails Tom Wolfe's shoddy approach to journalism, calling Wolfe's writing 'parajournalism' — a mixture of fact and fiction where 'entertainment, rather than information is the aim of its producers.' Macdonald was a brilliant and influential writer of his time; hopefully this new collection will introduce him to a new generation of readers. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A New York Review Books Original

An uncompromising contrarian, a passionate polemicist, a man of quick wit and wide learning, an anarchist, a pacifist, and a virtuoso of the slashing phrase, Dwight Macdonald was an indefatigable and indomitable critic of America’s susceptibility to well-meaning cultural fakery: all those estimable, eminent, prizewinning works of art that are said to be good and good for you and are not. He dubbed this phenomenon “Midcult” and he attacked it not only on aesthetic but on political grounds. Midcult rendered people complacent and compliant, secure in their common stupidity but neither happy nor free.

This new selection of Macdonald’s finest essays, assembled by John Summers, the editor of The Baffler, reintroduces a remarkable American critic and writer. In the era of smart, sexy, and everything indie, Macdonald remains as pertinent and challenging as ever.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.