Tournament of Books 2015
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | January 30, 2015

    Charles Baxter: IMG Writers and the Bottle



    Why are people so interested in drunk writers? Recently I was sent a very interesting nonfiction book, The Trip to Echo Spring: On Writers and... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$17.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
4 Burnside Literature- A to Z
1 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z
12 Remote Warehouse Literature- A to Z

The Human Comedy: Selected Stories (New York Review Books Classics)

by

The Human Comedy: Selected Stories (New York Review Books Classics) Cover

ISBN13: 9781590176641
ISBN10: 1590176642
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Honoré de Balzac (1799–1850), one of the greatest and most influential of novelists, was born in Tours and educated at the Collège de Vendôme and the Sorbonne. He began his career as a pseudonymous writer of sensational potboilers before achieving success with a historical novel, The Chouans. Balzac then conceived his great work, La Comédie humaine, an ongoing series of novels in which he set out to offer a complete picture of contemporary society and manners. Always working under an extraordinary burden of debt, Balzac wrote some eighty-five novels in the course of his last twenty years, including such masterpieces as Père Goriot, Eugénie Grandet, Lost Illusions, and Cousin Bette. In 1850, he married Eveline Hanska, a rich Polish woman with whom he had long conducted an intimate correspondence. Three months later he died. In addition to the present collection, NYRB Classics publishes a translation of Balzac’s The Unknown Masterpiece and Gambara.

Peter Brooks taught for many years at Yale, where he was Sterling Professor of Comparative Literature. He has written about Balzac in a number of books, including The Melodramatic Imagination, Reading for the Plot, Henry James Goes to Paris, and Enigmas of Identity. He is currently Andrew W. Mellon Scholar at Princeton and is at work on Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris.

Linda Asher has translated works by Milan Kundera, Georges Simenon, Victor Hugo, Jean-Pierre Vernant, Restif de la Bretonne, and many others. A former fiction editor at The New Yorker, she has and ASCAP Deems Taylor translation prizes and is a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters of the French Republic.

Carol Cosman is a translator of French literature and letters. Her work includes Exile and the Kingdom by Albert Camus, Colonel Chabert by Honoré de Balzac, America Day by Day by Simone de Beauvoir, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life by Emile Durkheim, and The Family Idiot (a study of Flaubert) by Jean-Paul Sartre.

Jordan Stump is a professor of French at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln; the author, most recently, of The Other Book: Bewilderments of Fiction; and the translator of some twenty works of (mostly) contemporary French prose by authors such as Marie NDiaye, Eric Chevillard, Antoine Volodine, and Jean-Philippe Toussaint. His translation of Claude Simon’s The Jardin des Plantes won the French-American Foundation’s annual translation prize in 2001.

Review:

"As Peter Brooks observes in his marvelous introduction to this volume, reading Balzac is almost always thought of as requiring time — 'of a length for evenings without television or smartphones.' Yet, amongst the exhaustive tales that make up his panoptic portrait of 19th-century France are shorter works that distill and exemplify Balzac's great gifts. Collected here are nine supremely satisfying tales from the father of realism, newly translated for the first time in a century. Amongst them is the famous 'Serrasine,' which unravels an unworldly young sculptor's infatuation with an opera star. 'Gobseck' is the intricate examination of Paris's preeminent usurer, which reads as an allegory of the accelerating greed in the capitalism of Balzac's time. Included also are lesser known works such as 'A Passion in the Desert,' a shimmering mirage of a tale that tells of a lost soldier's exotic encounter. Or 'Adieu,' a proto-postmodern tale in which a soldier meticulously brings a memory to life to win back his lover from madness. These tales provide the reader a healthy introduction to Balzac's famous hyperbole, his melodrama, and his extended descriptions and explanations where nothing goes unsaid. We don't read Balzac for his refined style; rather, his genius lies in the sheer ambition of his reach, the vastness of his grasp." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

An NYRB Classics Original

Characters from every corner of society and all walks of life—lords and ladies, businessmen and military men, poor clerks,  unforgiving moneylenders, aspiring politicians, artists, actresses, swindlers, misers, parasites, sexual adventurers, crackpots,  and more—move through the pages of The Human Comedy, Balzac’s multivolume magnum opus, an interlinked chronicle of modernity in all its splendor and squalor. The Human Comedy includes the great roomy novels that have exercised such a sway over Balzac’s many literary inheritors, from Dostoyevsky and Henry James to Marcel Proust; it also contains an array of short fictions in which Balzac is at his most concentrated and forceful. Nine of these, all newly translated, appear in this volume, and together they provide an unequaled overview of a great writer’s obsessions and art. Here are “The Duchesse de Langeais,” “A Passion in the Desert,” and “Sarrasine”; tales of madness, illicit passion, ill-gotten gains, and crime. What unifies them, Peter Brooks points out in his introduction, is an incomparable storyteller’s fascination with the power of storytelling, while throughout we also detect what Proust so admired: the “mysterious circulation of blood and desire.”

About the Author

Honoré de Balzac (1799–1850) is generally credited as the inventor of the modern realistic novel. In more than ninety novels, he set forth French society and life as he saw it. He created a cast of more than two thousand individual and identifiable characters, some of whom reappear in different novels. He organized his works into his masterpiece, La Comédie humaine, which was the final result of his attempt to grasp the whole of society and experience into one varied but unified work.

 

Peter Brooks is the author of Henry James Goes to Paris, Realist Vision, Troubling Confessions, Reading for the Plot, The Melodramatic Imagination, and a number of other books, including the historical novel World Elsewhere. He taught for many years at Yale, where he was the Sterling Professor of Comparative Literature, and currently is the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholar at Princeton.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lukas, February 22, 2015 (view all comments by lukas)
"It is impossible to describe the scenes of high comedy that lay beneath this algebraic account of his life."
The Human Comedy (La Comedie Humaine) is the title given to Balzac's massive collected work, which includes novels, stories, and essays. Along with Flaubert, Zola, and de Maupassant, Balzac laid the groundwork for the modern novel and for the realist movement. This edition is comprised of 7 short stories and the novella "The Duchesse de Langeais." There's a helpful introduction and explanatory notes. If you like this, "Pere Goriot" (Old Goriot) is your next stop on the Balzac train. Fun fact: He drank a ton of coffee to fuel his work.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590176641
Author:
Balzac, Honore De
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Author:
Asher, Linda
Author:
Balzac, Honore de
Author:
Brooks, Peter
Author:
Stump, Jordan
Author:
Cosman, Carol
Author:
de Balzac, Honore
Subject:
Stories (single author)
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20140231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
464
Dimensions:
7.96 x 5.02 x 0.94 in 1 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Picture of Dorian Gray (Wadsworth... Used Trade Paper $4.95
  2. Faust (Norton Critical Editions) Used Trade Paper $9.50
  3. Under the Volcano (P.S.)
    Used Trade Paper $10.50
  4. One More Thing: Stories and Other...
    Used Hardcover $9.95
  5. The Tears of Eros Used Trade Paper $12.95

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

The Human Comedy: Selected Stories (New York Review Books Classics) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.95 In Stock
Product details 464 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590176641 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "As Peter Brooks observes in his marvelous introduction to this volume, reading Balzac is almost always thought of as requiring time — 'of a length for evenings without television or smartphones.' Yet, amongst the exhaustive tales that make up his panoptic portrait of 19th-century France are shorter works that distill and exemplify Balzac's great gifts. Collected here are nine supremely satisfying tales from the father of realism, newly translated for the first time in a century. Amongst them is the famous 'Serrasine,' which unravels an unworldly young sculptor's infatuation with an opera star. 'Gobseck' is the intricate examination of Paris's preeminent usurer, which reads as an allegory of the accelerating greed in the capitalism of Balzac's time. Included also are lesser known works such as 'A Passion in the Desert,' a shimmering mirage of a tale that tells of a lost soldier's exotic encounter. Or 'Adieu,' a proto-postmodern tale in which a soldier meticulously brings a memory to life to win back his lover from madness. These tales provide the reader a healthy introduction to Balzac's famous hyperbole, his melodrama, and his extended descriptions and explanations where nothing goes unsaid. We don't read Balzac for his refined style; rather, his genius lies in the sheer ambition of his reach, the vastness of his grasp." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , An NYRB Classics Original

Characters from every corner of society and all walks of life—lords and ladies, businessmen and military men, poor clerks,  unforgiving moneylenders, aspiring politicians, artists, actresses, swindlers, misers, parasites, sexual adventurers, crackpots,  and more—move through the pages of The Human Comedy, Balzac’s multivolume magnum opus, an interlinked chronicle of modernity in all its splendor and squalor. The Human Comedy includes the great roomy novels that have exercised such a sway over Balzac’s many literary inheritors, from Dostoyevsky and Henry James to Marcel Proust; it also contains an array of short fictions in which Balzac is at his most concentrated and forceful. Nine of these, all newly translated, appear in this volume, and together they provide an unequaled overview of a great writer’s obsessions and art. Here are “The Duchesse de Langeais,” “A Passion in the Desert,” and “Sarrasine”; tales of madness, illicit passion, ill-gotten gains, and crime. What unifies them, Peter Brooks points out in his introduction, is an incomparable storyteller’s fascination with the power of storytelling, while throughout we also detect what Proust so admired: the “mysterious circulation of blood and desire.”

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.