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This title in other editions

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?

by

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations? Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

and#147;A world in which the leading liberal-democratic nation does not assume its role as world policeman will become a world in which dictatorships contend, or unite, to fill the breach. Americans seeking a return to an isolationist garden of Edenand#151;alone and undisturbed in the world, knowing neither good nor eviland#151;will soon find themselves living within shooting range of global pandemonium.and#8221;and#151;From the Introduction

In a brilliant book that will elevate foreign policy in the national conversation, Pulitzer Prizeand#150;winning columnist Bret Stephens makes a powerful case for American intervention abroad.

In December 2011 the last American soldier left Iraq. and#147;Weand#8217;re leaving behind a sovereign, stable, and self-reliant Iraq,and#8221; boasted President Obama. He was proved devastatingly wrong less than three years later as jihadists seized the Iraqi city of Mosul. The event cast another dark shadow over the future of global orderand#151;a shadow, which, Bret Stephens argues, we ignore at our peril.

America in Retreat identifies a profound crisis on the global horizon. As Americans seek to withdraw from the world to tend to domestic problems, Americaand#8217;s adversaries spy opportunity. Vladimir Putinand#8217;s ambitions to restore the glory of the czarist empire go effectively unchecked, as do Chinaand#8217;s attempts to expand its maritime claims in the South China Sea, as do Iranand#8217;s efforts to develop nuclear capabilities. Civil war in Syria displaces millions throughout the Middle East while turbocharging the forces of radical Islam. Long-time allies such as Japan, Saudi Arabia, and Israel, doubting the credibility of American security guarantees, are tempted to freelance their foreign policy, irrespective of U.S. interests.

Deploying his characteristic stylistic flair and intellectual prowess, Stephens argues for American reengagement abroad. He explains how military intervention in Iraq and Afghanistan was the right course of action, foolishly executed. He traces the intellectual continuity between anti-interventionist statesmen such as Henry Wallace and Robert Taft in the late 1940s and Barack Obama and Rand Paul today. And he makes an unapologetic case for Pax Americana, and#147;a world in which English is the default language of business, diplomacy, tourism, and technology; in which markets are global, capital is mobile, and trade is increasingly free; in which values of openness and tolerance are, when not the norm, often the aspiration.and#8221;

In a terrifying chapter imagining the world of 2019, Stephens shows what could lie in store if Americans continue on their current course. Yet we are not doomed to this future. Stephens makes a passionate rejoinder to those who argue that America is in decline, a process that is often beyond the reach of political cures. Instead, we are in retreatand#151;the result of faulty, but reversible, policy choices. By embracing its historic responsibility as the worldand#8217;s policeman, America can safeguard not only greater peace in the world but also greater prosperity at home.

At once lively and sobering, America in Retreat offers trenchant analysis of the gravest threat to global order, from a rising star of political commentary.and#160;

Review:

"'The power of the state is back,' announces Bremmer (The Fat Tail), president of the Eurasia Group, in this sobering examination of the threat the emerging powers of China, Russia, and Saudi Arabia pose to the free market. The book presents a whirlwind history of capitalism from mercantilism through the end of the cold war to the ascendancy of 'state capitalism,' a political and economic arrangement in which states exert their influence over markets and big business to serve their own interests. Bremmer provides informative case studies of economies with varying degrees of state control: Algeria's authoritarian regime, Mexico's relatively open and democratic system, and China, the 'leading practitioner of state capitalism,' in which Beijing has assumed only more economic power in the wake of the financial crisis. He weighs how free market economies can compete and concludes on a hopeful note, laying out a powerful case for the superiority of regulated free markets above state capitalism and a clear prescription for how the U.S. can defend its competitive advantage in the future." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

This work details the growing phenomenon of state capitalism, a system in which governments drive local economies through ownership of market-dominant companies. This trend threatens America's competitive edge and the conduct of free markets everywhere.

Synopsis:

and#147;The next financial collapse will resembleand#160;nothing in history. . . . Deciding uponand#160;the best course to follow will requireand#160;comprehending a minefield of risks, whileand#160;poised at a crossroads, pondering theand#160;death of the dollar.and#8221;

The international monetary system has collapsed threeand#160;times in the past hundred years, in 1914, 1939, and 1971.and#160;Each collapse was followed by a period of tumult: war,and#160;civil unrest, or significant damage to the stability of theand#160;global economy. Now James Rickards, the acclaimedand#160;author of Currency Wars, shows why another collapseand#160;is rapidly approachingand#151;and why this time, nothing lessand#160;than the institution of money itself is at risk.

The American dollar has been the global reserveand#160;currency since the end of the Second World War. If theand#160;dollar fails, the entire international monetary system willand#160;fail with it. No other currency has the deep, liquid poolsand#160;of assets needed to do the job.

Optimists have always said, in essence, that thereand#8217;sand#160;nothing to worry aboutand#151;that confidence in the dollarand#160;will never truly be shaken, no matter how high ourand#160;national debt or how dysfunctional our government. Butand#160;in the last few years, the risks have become too big toand#160;ignore. While Washington is gridlocked and unable toand#160;make progress on our long-term problems, our biggestand#160;economic competitorsand#151;China, Russia, and the oilproducingand#160;nations of the Middle Eastand#151;are doing everythingand#160;possible to end U.S. monetary hegemony. Theand#160;potential results: Financial warfare. Deflation. Hyperinflation.and#160;Market collapse. Chaos.

Rickards offers a bracing analysis of these andand#160;other threats to the dollar. The fundamental problem isand#160;that money and wealth have become more and moreand#160;detached. Money is transitory and ephemeral, and it mayand#160;soon be worthless if central bankers and politicians continueand#160;on their current path. But true wealth is permanentand#160;and tangible, and it has real value worldwide.

The author shows how everyday citizens who saveand#160;and invest have become guinea pigs in the centraland#160;bankersand#8217; laboratory. The worldand#8217;s major financial playersand#151;national governments, big banks, multilateraland#160;institutionsand#151;will always muddle through by patchingand#160;together new rules of the

game. The real victims of theand#160;next crisis will be small investors who assumed that whatand#160;worked for decades will keep working.

Fortunately, itand#8217;s not too late to prepare for the comingand#160;death of money. Rickards explains the power ofand#160;converting unreliable money into real wealth: gold, land,and#160;fine art, and other long-term stores of value. As he writes:and#160;and#147;The coming collapse of the dollar and the internationaland#160;monetary system is entirely foreseeable. . . . Only nationsand#160;and individuals who make provision today will surviveand#160;the maelstrom to come.and#8221;

Synopsis:

The sequel to national bestseller Currency Wars predicts the next collapse of theand#160;monetary system and shows investors how to survive it

The international monetary system collapsed three times in the past hundred yearsand#151;in 1914, 1939, and 1971and#151;and the next collapse is already in sight. This time the dollar wonand#8217;t save us. In fact, the dollar itself will be the cause of the crisis.

Central bankers and the head of the IMF candidly admit that monetary policy is in unchartered waters. The world is witnessing no less than a global money experiment. Savers, investors, and everyday citizens are the guinea pigs in the central bankersand#8217; laboratory.

Bestselling author James Rickards explains why money and wealth have now become separated. Money is transitory, ephemeral, and may soon be worthless if central bankers continue on their current path. Wealth is permanent, tangible, and has real value worldwide. Gold, fine art, and land are forms of wealth. Investors who convert paper money into real wealth will survive the coming monetary maelstrom. But those who do not will lose what they have.

Rickards illuminates the death of money unfolding before our eyes, and helps readers prepare before itand#8217;s too late.

and#147; Unsettling . . . fascinating . . . a thorough analysis of how nations have manipulated their currencies . . . with disastrous consequences.and#8221; and#151;and#160;Fort Worth Star-Telegram

and#147; One of the scariest books Iand#8217;ve read this year . . . The picture that emerges is dark yet comprehensive and satisfying.and#8221; and#151;and#160;Bloomberg BusinessWeek

and#147;One of the most urgent books of the fall.and#8221; and#151; Politico

About the Author

Ian Bremmer is the president of Eurasia Group, the world's leading global political risk research and consulting firm. He has written for The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Newsweek, Foreign Affairs, and other publications, and his previous books are The J Curve: A New Way to Understand Why Nations Rise and Fall and The Fat Tail: The Power of Political Knowledge for Strategic Investing.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781591843016
Subtitle:
The New Isolationism and the Coming Global Disorder
Author:
Bremmer, Ian
Author:
Rickards, James
Author:
Stephens, Bret
Publisher:
Sentinel HC
Subject:
Government & Business
Subject:
Free Enterprise
Subject:
Business Writing
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Money & Monetary Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20141118
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
A few charts
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
18-17

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Related Subjects

Business » Business Law
Business » General
Business » Management
Business » Writing
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations? Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Portfolio - English 9781591843016 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'The power of the state is back,' announces Bremmer (The Fat Tail), president of the Eurasia Group, in this sobering examination of the threat the emerging powers of China, Russia, and Saudi Arabia pose to the free market. The book presents a whirlwind history of capitalism from mercantilism through the end of the cold war to the ascendancy of 'state capitalism,' a political and economic arrangement in which states exert their influence over markets and big business to serve their own interests. Bremmer provides informative case studies of economies with varying degrees of state control: Algeria's authoritarian regime, Mexico's relatively open and democratic system, and China, the 'leading practitioner of state capitalism,' in which Beijing has assumed only more economic power in the wake of the financial crisis. He weighs how free market economies can compete and concludes on a hopeful note, laying out a powerful case for the superiority of regulated free markets above state capitalism and a clear prescription for how the U.S. can defend its competitive advantage in the future." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , This work details the growing phenomenon of state capitalism, a system in which governments drive local economies through ownership of market-dominant companies. This trend threatens America's competitive edge and the conduct of free markets everywhere.
"Synopsis" by ,
and#147;The next financial collapse will resembleand#160;nothing in history. . . . Deciding uponand#160;the best course to follow will requireand#160;comprehending a minefield of risks, whileand#160;poised at a crossroads, pondering theand#160;death of the dollar.and#8221;

The international monetary system has collapsed threeand#160;times in the past hundred years, in 1914, 1939, and 1971.and#160;Each collapse was followed by a period of tumult: war,and#160;civil unrest, or significant damage to the stability of theand#160;global economy. Now James Rickards, the acclaimedand#160;author of Currency Wars, shows why another collapseand#160;is rapidly approachingand#151;and why this time, nothing lessand#160;than the institution of money itself is at risk.

The American dollar has been the global reserveand#160;currency since the end of the Second World War. If theand#160;dollar fails, the entire international monetary system willand#160;fail with it. No other currency has the deep, liquid poolsand#160;of assets needed to do the job.

Optimists have always said, in essence, that thereand#8217;sand#160;nothing to worry aboutand#151;that confidence in the dollarand#160;will never truly be shaken, no matter how high ourand#160;national debt or how dysfunctional our government. Butand#160;in the last few years, the risks have become too big toand#160;ignore. While Washington is gridlocked and unable toand#160;make progress on our long-term problems, our biggestand#160;economic competitorsand#151;China, Russia, and the oilproducingand#160;nations of the Middle Eastand#151;are doing everythingand#160;possible to end U.S. monetary hegemony. Theand#160;potential results: Financial warfare. Deflation. Hyperinflation.and#160;Market collapse. Chaos.

Rickards offers a bracing analysis of these andand#160;other threats to the dollar. The fundamental problem isand#160;that money and wealth have become more and moreand#160;detached. Money is transitory and ephemeral, and it mayand#160;soon be worthless if central bankers and politicians continueand#160;on their current path. But true wealth is permanentand#160;and tangible, and it has real value worldwide.

The author shows how everyday citizens who saveand#160;and invest have become guinea pigs in the centraland#160;bankersand#8217; laboratory. The worldand#8217;s major financial playersand#151;national governments, big banks, multilateraland#160;institutionsand#151;will always muddle through by patchingand#160;together new rules of the

game. The real victims of theand#160;next crisis will be small investors who assumed that whatand#160;worked for decades will keep working.

Fortunately, itand#8217;s not too late to prepare for the comingand#160;death of money. Rickards explains the power ofand#160;converting unreliable money into real wealth: gold, land,and#160;fine art, and other long-term stores of value. As he writes:and#160;and#147;The coming collapse of the dollar and the internationaland#160;monetary system is entirely foreseeable. . . . Only nationsand#160;and individuals who make provision today will surviveand#160;the maelstrom to come.and#8221;

"Synopsis" by ,
The sequel to national bestseller Currency Wars predicts the next collapse of theand#160;monetary system and shows investors how to survive it

The international monetary system collapsed three times in the past hundred yearsand#151;in 1914, 1939, and 1971and#151;and the next collapse is already in sight. This time the dollar wonand#8217;t save us. In fact, the dollar itself will be the cause of the crisis.

Central bankers and the head of the IMF candidly admit that monetary policy is in unchartered waters. The world is witnessing no less than a global money experiment. Savers, investors, and everyday citizens are the guinea pigs in the central bankersand#8217; laboratory.

Bestselling author James Rickards explains why money and wealth have now become separated. Money is transitory, ephemeral, and may soon be worthless if central bankers continue on their current path. Wealth is permanent, tangible, and has real value worldwide. Gold, fine art, and land are forms of wealth. Investors who convert paper money into real wealth will survive the coming monetary maelstrom. But those who do not will lose what they have.

Rickards illuminates the death of money unfolding before our eyes, and helps readers prepare before itand#8217;s too late.

and#147; Unsettling . . . fascinating . . . a thorough analysis of how nations have manipulated their currencies . . . with disastrous consequences.and#8221; and#151;and#160;Fort Worth Star-Telegram

and#147; One of the scariest books Iand#8217;ve read this year . . . The picture that emerges is dark yet comprehensive and satisfying.and#8221; and#151;and#160;Bloomberg BusinessWeek

and#147;One of the most urgent books of the fall.and#8221; and#151; Politico

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