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25 Local Warehouse Psychology- Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders
25 Remote Warehouse Psychology- Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders

The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey Into the Dark Side of the Brain

by

The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey Into the Dark Side of the Brain Cover

ISBN13: 9781591846000
ISBN10: 1591846005
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“The last scan in the pile was strikingly odd. In fact it looked exactly like the most abnormal of the scans I had just been writing about, suggesting that the poor individual it belonged to was a psychopath—or at least shared an uncomfortable amount of traits with one....When I found out who the scan belonged to, I had to believe there was a mistake....But there had been no mistake. The scan was mine.”

For the first fifty-eight years of his life James Fallon was by all appearances a normal guy. A successful neuroscientist and medical school professor, hed been raised in a loving, supportive family, married his high school sweetheart, and had three kids and lots of friends.

Then he learned a shocking truth that would not only disrupt his personal and professional life, but would lead him to question the very nature of his own identity.

The Psychopath Inside tells the fascinating story of Fallons reaction to the discovery that he has the brain of a psychopath. While researching serial murderers, he uncovered a distinct neurological pattern in their brain scans that helped explain their cold and violent behavior. A few months later he learned that he was descended from a family with a long line of murderers which confirmed that Fallons own brain pattern wasnt a fluke.

As a scientist convinced that humans are shaped by their genetics, Fallon set out to reconcile the truth about his brain with everything he knew about the mind, behavior, and the influence of nature vs. nurture on our personalities. How could he, a successful scientist and a happy family man with no history of violence, be a psychopath? How much did his biology influence his behavior? Was he capable of some of the gruesome atrocities perpetrated by the serial killers he had studied?

Combining his personal experience with scientific analysis, Fallon shares his journey and the discoveries that ultimately led him to understand that, despite everything science can teach us, humans are even more complex than we can imagine.

Review:

"Is author Fallon a law-abiding research scientist and family man or a dangerous psychopath? In this memoir-meets-pop-sci examination of psychopathy, Fallon discovers, to his initial surprise, that he has brain functions similar to a cohort of hardened criminals. The book takes chapter-length looks at the neurological features, possible genetic and epigenetic causes, and developmental triggers of psychopathy, with detours through Fallon's personal and familial history. Unfortunately, Fallon's memoir of realizations is emotionally flat (which is perhaps unfair criteria to judge a psychopath by), lazily assembled, and amounts to little more than a confessional booth's enumeration of sins. He cheats with his kids at Scrabble, parties too hard, alienates his co-workers, and takes his brother to an Ebola-infested cave and considers using him as lion bait. These vices, Fallon is happy to tell you, provide him a great deal of malevolent glee, though there is little pleasure for readers to bask in — Fallon's narration is too sterile and, ironically, too self-serving to ever entice the reader. For a quick overview of current theories of brain science and mental illness, Fallon's book is useful; for insight into foreign mental and emotional territories, look elsewhere. Agent: Jane Dystel, Dystel & Goderich Literary Management." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

“Compelling, essential reading for understanding the underpinnings of psychopathy.” — M. E. Thomas, author of Confessions of a Sociopath

For his first fifty-eight years, James Fallon was by all appearances a normal guy. A successful neuroscientist and professor, hed been raised in a loving family, married his high school sweetheart, and had three kids and lots of friends. Then he learned a shocking truth that would not only disrupt his personal and professional life, but would lead him to question the very nature of his own identity.

While researching serial killers, he uncovered a pattern in their brain scans that helped explain their cold and violent behavior. Astonishingly, his own scan matched that pattern. And a few months later he learned that he was descended from a long line of murderers. Fallon set out to reconcile the truth about his own brain with everything he knew as a scientist about the mind, behavior, and personality.

Synopsis:

The memoir of a neuroscientist whose research led him to a bizarre personal discovery

 

James Fallon had spent an entire career studying how our brains affect our behavior when his research suddenly turned personal. While studying brain scans of several family members, he discovered that one perfectly matched a pattern hed found in the brains of serial killers. This meant one of two things: Either his familys scans had been mixed up with those of felons or someone in his family was a psychopath.

 

Even more disturbing: The scan in question was his own.

 

This is Fallons account of coming to grips with this discovery and its implications. How could he, a happy family man who had never been prone to violence, be a psychopath? How much did his biology influence his behavior?

 

Fallon shares his journey to answer these questions and the discoveries that ultimately led to his conclusion: Despite everything science can teach, humans are even more complex than we can imagine.

About the Author

Jon Ronson�s books include the New York Times bestseller The Psychopath Test, and Them: Adventures with Extremists and The Men Who Stare at Goats�both international bestsellers. The Men Who Stare at Goats was adapted as a major motion picture, released in 2009 and starring George Clooney. Ronson lives in London and New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

tenrec, August 10, 2014 (view all comments by tenrec)
Recently, my wife asked me, "Why are you reading so many books about psychopaths?" I answered her by saying, "I suspect I am a bit of a psychopath myself," which rather shocked her. Most people I know are empathic people whose instincts are positive and good. My wife and daughter fit into such a description. I tend to be rather cool and less empathic than most people I know. I am also fascinated by morbid movies and books, stories (fictional and truthful). I have had serious involvements throughout my life with people who were predatory and dangerous. Two were bosses. One was a cult leader who stole about a million dollars in Southern Oregon over a twenty year period. None of these were murderers, but I am pretty sure they all three were non-violent psychopaths. They completely fooled me and many other people. I have some empathy. I have not murdered, tortured, or raped; I have done some good deeds. I consider this book excellent because it is well written, because the author has immense credentials as far as how the brain works, and because he discovered that he himself is a psychopath in a very amusing way. Why is he by usual standards a reasonably decent person when his family tree contains many killers going back to kings of England centuries ago? Interesting answers can be found in the book. If you are an empathic person, you or people you love may be victims of psychopaths. They may be your spouse or lover or your boss, even if they are not killers. This book may help you protect yourself. If you wonder why you are colder and less empathic than most of the people you know, this book may interest you or provide some comfort, as it did for me.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781591846000
Author:
Fallon, James
Publisher:
Current
Author:
Ronson, Jon
Subject:
Popular Culture
Subject:
Pathological Psychology
Subject:
Psychology - Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20131031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey Into the Dark Side of the Brain New Hardcover
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$27.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Current - English 9781591846000 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Is author Fallon a law-abiding research scientist and family man or a dangerous psychopath? In this memoir-meets-pop-sci examination of psychopathy, Fallon discovers, to his initial surprise, that he has brain functions similar to a cohort of hardened criminals. The book takes chapter-length looks at the neurological features, possible genetic and epigenetic causes, and developmental triggers of psychopathy, with detours through Fallon's personal and familial history. Unfortunately, Fallon's memoir of realizations is emotionally flat (which is perhaps unfair criteria to judge a psychopath by), lazily assembled, and amounts to little more than a confessional booth's enumeration of sins. He cheats with his kids at Scrabble, parties too hard, alienates his co-workers, and takes his brother to an Ebola-infested cave and considers using him as lion bait. These vices, Fallon is happy to tell you, provide him a great deal of malevolent glee, though there is little pleasure for readers to bask in — Fallon's narration is too sterile and, ironically, too self-serving to ever entice the reader. For a quick overview of current theories of brain science and mental illness, Fallon's book is useful; for insight into foreign mental and emotional territories, look elsewhere. Agent: Jane Dystel, Dystel & Goderich Literary Management." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
“Compelling, essential reading for understanding the underpinnings of psychopathy.” — M. E. Thomas, author of Confessions of a Sociopath

For his first fifty-eight years, James Fallon was by all appearances a normal guy. A successful neuroscientist and professor, hed been raised in a loving family, married his high school sweetheart, and had three kids and lots of friends. Then he learned a shocking truth that would not only disrupt his personal and professional life, but would lead him to question the very nature of his own identity.

While researching serial killers, he uncovered a pattern in their brain scans that helped explain their cold and violent behavior. Astonishingly, his own scan matched that pattern. And a few months later he learned that he was descended from a long line of murderers. Fallon set out to reconcile the truth about his own brain with everything he knew as a scientist about the mind, behavior, and personality.

"Synopsis" by ,
The memoir of a neuroscientist whose research led him to a bizarre personal discovery

 

James Fallon had spent an entire career studying how our brains affect our behavior when his research suddenly turned personal. While studying brain scans of several family members, he discovered that one perfectly matched a pattern hed found in the brains of serial killers. This meant one of two things: Either his familys scans had been mixed up with those of felons or someone in his family was a psychopath.

 

Even more disturbing: The scan in question was his own.

 

This is Fallons account of coming to grips with this discovery and its implications. How could he, a happy family man who had never been prone to violence, be a psychopath? How much did his biology influence his behavior?

 

Fallon shares his journey to answer these questions and the discoveries that ultimately led to his conclusion: Despite everything science can teach, humans are even more complex than we can imagine.

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