The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | June 18, 2014

Daniel H. Wilson: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Daniel H. Wilson



Like many writers, I'm constantly haunting coffee shops with a laptop out and my headphones on. I listen to a lot of music while I write, and songs... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$13.95
List price: $20.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse GN- GRAPHIC NOVELS

Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me: A Graphic Memoir

by

Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me: A Graphic Memoir Cover

ISBN13: 9781592407323
ISBN10: 1592407323
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $13.95!

 

Staff Pick

In Marbles, Ellen Forney explores the relationship between mental illness and creativity. A working cartoonist in Seattle, she is diagnosed with bipolar disorder and must decide whether to accept treatment (and risk sacrificing her art) or continue self-medicating and hope for the best. Marbles is a satisfying read, both as a personal memoir and as a glimpse into the relationship between bipolar disorder and the artistic temperament.
Recommended by Ashleigh, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Cartoonist Ellen Forney explores the relationship between "crazy" and "creative" in this graphic memoir of her bipolar disorder, woven with stories of famous bipolar artists and writers.

Shortly before her thirtieth birthday, Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Flagrantly manic and terrified that medications would cause her to lose creativity, she began a years-long struggle to find mental stability while retaining her passions and creativity.

Searching to make sense of the popular concept of the crazy artist, she finds inspiration from the lives and work of other artists and writers who suffered from mood disorders, including Vincent van Gogh, Georgia O'Keeffe, William Styron, and Sylvia Plath. She also researches the clinical aspects of bipolar disorder, including the strengths and limitations of various treatments and medications, and what studies tell us about the conundrum of attempting to "cure" an otherwise brilliant mind.

Darkly funny and intensely personal, Forney's memoir provides a visceral glimpse into the effects of a mood disorder on an artist's work, as she shares her own story through bold black-and-white images and evocative prose.

Review:

"Eisner nominee Forney confesses her struggles with being diagnosed as bipolar in this witty and insightful memoir. Beginning with the manic episode that led to her diagnosis, Forney chronicles her journey toward reconciling the dual natures of bipolar disorder: a dangerous disease, but also a source of inspiration for many artists. The long journey of medication and therapy is kept from gloom by Forney's lively, likable cartooning. Alternating among her cartoonish panels, realistic illustrations, and photographs of the sketch pad she kept as part of her therapy, Forney allows her art to chronicle her outer life while revealing her inner state of mind. Her personal journey provides a core story that examines her mood disorders and their connection to creativity for the many 'crazy artists' she imagines as part of 'Club van Gogh.' Readers struggling with their own mania or depression will find Forney good company, and others searching for insight into the minds of troubled artists will find Forney an engaging storyteller." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Ellen Forney's memoir of her bipolar diagnosis and long pharmacopic trek toward balance is painfully honest and joyously exuberant. Her drawings evoke the neuron-crackling high of mania and the schematic bleakness of depression with deft immediacy. Forney is at the height of her powers as she explores the tenuous line between mood disorders and creativity itself." Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic

Review:

"Dense with intellectual and emotional power, Forney's book is a treasure — as a memoir, as an artwork, and as a beautifully conceived and executed commentary on both mental experience and the creative life. With wit, humor, a wicked sense of the absurd, and eloquent insight into the beauty that shines through the mercurial life of the mind, this graphic memoir explores its subject with a particular precision and power. Forney should be read." Marya Hornbacher, author of Madness: A Bipolar Life

Review:

"Ellen's work has always been hilarious and sharp, but Marbles has an emotional resonance that shows new depth as an artist and a writer. This is an extremely personal, brave, and rewarding book." Dan Savage, editor of It Gets Better and author of The Kid

Review:

"I have always admired Ellen Forney's humor and honesty, but Marbles is a major leap forward. It's a hilarious memoir about mental illness, yes, but it's also an incisive study of what it means to be human and how we ache to become better humans. Amazing stuff." Sherman Alexie, bestselling author of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Review:

"Not only does her conversational intimacy draw readers in, but her drawings perfectly capture the exhilarating frenzy of mania and the dark void of depression....Forney's story should resonate with those grappling with similar issues, while her artistry should appeal to a wide readership." Kirkus Reviews, Starred Reviews

Synopsis:

Growing up, Liz Prince wasn't a girly girl, dressing in pink tutus or playing Pretty Pretty princess like the other girls in her neighborhood. But she wasn't exactly one of the guys either, as she quickly learned when her Little League baseball coach exiled her to the outfield instead of letting her take the pitcher's mound. Liz was somewhere in the middle, and Tomboy is the story of her struggle to find the place where she belonged. Tomboy is a graphic novel about refusing gender boundaries, yet unwittingly embracing gender stereotypes at the same time, and realizing later in life that you can be just as much of a girl in jeans and a T-shirt as you can in a pink tutu. A memoir told anecdotally, Tomboy follows author and zine artist Liz Prince through her early childhood into adulthood and explores her ever-evolving struggles and wishes regarding what it means to "be a girl." From staunchly refuting anything she perceived as being "girly" to the point of misogyny, to discovering through the punk community that your identity is whatever you make of it, regardless of your gender, Tomboy is as much humorous and honest as it is at points uncomfortable and heartbreaking.

Synopsis:

Cartoonist Ellen Forney explores the relationship between andldquo;crazyandrdquo; and andldquo;creativeandrdquo; in this graphic memoir of her bipolar disorder, woven with stories of famous bipolar artists and writers.

and#160;

Shortly before her thirtieth birthday, Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Flagrantly manic and terrified that medications would cause her to lose creativity, she began a years-long struggle to find mental stability while retaining her passions and creativity.

Searching to make sense of the popular concept of the crazy artist, she finds inspiration from the lives and work of other artists and writers who suffered from mood disorders, including Vincent van Gogh, Georgia Oandrsquo;Keeffe, William Styron, and Sylvia Plath. She also researches the clinical aspects of bipolar disorder, including the strengths and limitations of various treatments and medications, and what studies tell us about the conundrum of attempting to andldquo;cureandrdquo; an otherwise brilliant mind.

Darkly funny and intensely personal, Forneyandrsquo;s memoir provides a visceral glimpse into the effects of a mood disorder on an artistandrsquo;s work, as she shares her own story through bold black-and-white images and evocative prose.

About the Author

Ellen Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder shortly before her thirtieth birthday. A lifelong cartoonist, she collaborated with Sherman Alexie on National Book Award-winning The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, and created Eisner Award-nominated comic books I Love Led Zeppelin and Monkey Food: The Complete "I Was Seven in '75" Collection. She teaches comics courses at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, Washington.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

marzinthestars, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by marzinthestars)
Very good visual description of the illness. I enjoyed the graphic novel style. Made a serious subject an easy read and a good laugh. I learned about the illness as well as how it affected the author. I would recommend this book to anyone suffering from a mental illness.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781592407323
Author:
Forney, Ellen
Publisher:
Gotham Books
Author:
Prince, Liz
Subject:
SELF-HELP / Depression
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20121131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 9
Language:
English
Illustrations:
BandW illustrations t/o
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in
Age Level:
from 18

Other books you might like

  1. The New Kings of Nonfiction
    Used Trade Paper $6.95
  2. Flight Behavior
    Sale Hardcover $10.98
  3. The Oath: The Obama White House and...
    Used Hardcover $9.95
  4. My Berlin Kitchen: A Love Story... Used Trade Paper $8.95

Related Subjects


Biography » General
Featured Titles » Arts
Featured Titles » Biography
Featured Titles » General
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Alternative
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Featured Titles
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » General
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Nonfiction
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Depression
Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me: A Graphic Memoir Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$13.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Gotham Books - English 9781592407323 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

In Marbles, Ellen Forney explores the relationship between mental illness and creativity. A working cartoonist in Seattle, she is diagnosed with bipolar disorder and must decide whether to accept treatment (and risk sacrificing her art) or continue self-medicating and hope for the best. Marbles is a satisfying read, both as a personal memoir and as a glimpse into the relationship between bipolar disorder and the artistic temperament.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Eisner nominee Forney confesses her struggles with being diagnosed as bipolar in this witty and insightful memoir. Beginning with the manic episode that led to her diagnosis, Forney chronicles her journey toward reconciling the dual natures of bipolar disorder: a dangerous disease, but also a source of inspiration for many artists. The long journey of medication and therapy is kept from gloom by Forney's lively, likable cartooning. Alternating among her cartoonish panels, realistic illustrations, and photographs of the sketch pad she kept as part of her therapy, Forney allows her art to chronicle her outer life while revealing her inner state of mind. Her personal journey provides a core story that examines her mood disorders and their connection to creativity for the many 'crazy artists' she imagines as part of 'Club van Gogh.' Readers struggling with their own mania or depression will find Forney good company, and others searching for insight into the minds of troubled artists will find Forney an engaging storyteller." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Ellen Forney's memoir of her bipolar diagnosis and long pharmacopic trek toward balance is painfully honest and joyously exuberant. Her drawings evoke the neuron-crackling high of mania and the schematic bleakness of depression with deft immediacy. Forney is at the height of her powers as she explores the tenuous line between mood disorders and creativity itself."
"Review" by , "Dense with intellectual and emotional power, Forney's book is a treasure — as a memoir, as an artwork, and as a beautifully conceived and executed commentary on both mental experience and the creative life. With wit, humor, a wicked sense of the absurd, and eloquent insight into the beauty that shines through the mercurial life of the mind, this graphic memoir explores its subject with a particular precision and power. Forney should be read."
"Review" by , "Ellen's work has always been hilarious and sharp, but Marbles has an emotional resonance that shows new depth as an artist and a writer. This is an extremely personal, brave, and rewarding book."
"Review" by , "I have always admired Ellen Forney's humor and honesty, but Marbles is a major leap forward. It's a hilarious memoir about mental illness, yes, but it's also an incisive study of what it means to be human and how we ache to become better humans. Amazing stuff."
"Review" by , "Not only does her conversational intimacy draw readers in, but her drawings perfectly capture the exhilarating frenzy of mania and the dark void of depression....Forney's story should resonate with those grappling with similar issues, while her artistry should appeal to a wide readership."
"Synopsis" by ,

Growing up, Liz Prince wasn't a girly girl, dressing in pink tutus or playing Pretty Pretty princess like the other girls in her neighborhood. But she wasn't exactly one of the guys either, as she quickly learned when her Little League baseball coach exiled her to the outfield instead of letting her take the pitcher's mound. Liz was somewhere in the middle, and Tomboy is the story of her struggle to find the place where she belonged. Tomboy is a graphic novel about refusing gender boundaries, yet unwittingly embracing gender stereotypes at the same time, and realizing later in life that you can be just as much of a girl in jeans and a T-shirt as you can in a pink tutu. A memoir told anecdotally, Tomboy follows author and zine artist Liz Prince through her early childhood into adulthood and explores her ever-evolving struggles and wishes regarding what it means to "be a girl." From staunchly refuting anything she perceived as being "girly" to the point of misogyny, to discovering through the punk community that your identity is whatever you make of it, regardless of your gender, Tomboy is as much humorous and honest as it is at points uncomfortable and heartbreaking.

"Synopsis" by ,

Cartoonist Ellen Forney explores the relationship between andldquo;crazyandrdquo; and andldquo;creativeandrdquo; in this graphic memoir of her bipolar disorder, woven with stories of famous bipolar artists and writers.

and#160;

Shortly before her thirtieth birthday, Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Flagrantly manic and terrified that medications would cause her to lose creativity, she began a years-long struggle to find mental stability while retaining her passions and creativity.

Searching to make sense of the popular concept of the crazy artist, she finds inspiration from the lives and work of other artists and writers who suffered from mood disorders, including Vincent van Gogh, Georgia Oandrsquo;Keeffe, William Styron, and Sylvia Plath. She also researches the clinical aspects of bipolar disorder, including the strengths and limitations of various treatments and medications, and what studies tell us about the conundrum of attempting to andldquo;cureandrdquo; an otherwise brilliant mind.

Darkly funny and intensely personal, Forneyandrsquo;s memoir provides a visceral glimpse into the effects of a mood disorder on an artistandrsquo;s work, as she shares her own story through bold black-and-white images and evocative prose.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.