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Born to Lose: Memoirs of a Compulsive Gambler

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Born to Lose: Memoirs of a Compulsive Gambler Cover

ISBN13: 9781592851539
ISBN10: 1592851533
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"My history of gambling really began before I was born." So opens Bill Lee's self-told story of gambling addiction, which is set in San Francisco's Chinatown and steeped in a culture where it is not unheard of for gamblers to lose their children to a bet. From wagering away his beloved baseball card collection in third grade to forfeiting everything he owned at blackjack tables in Las Vegas, every new and terrifying loss validated Lee's feelings of worthlessness. With gritty honesty and true humility, Lee describes what gambling addiction feels like and looks like from the inside. "Everything was a blur to me," Lee writes about a gambling jag that brought him to financial ruin. "I was in such a reckless and self-destructive frame of mind that I would have bet my life if required. In a way, thats what I was doing. I was that far gone from reality." In the end, however, Born to Lose is a memoir of hope as Lee reveals how recovery from his gambling addiction has been possible through the Twelve Step program.

Review:

"A gambling addiction can be as destructive and as life-altering as any other addiction, and former human resources exec and Lake Tahoe regular Lee has a story to prove it. Breezily written and compelling, Lee's book chronicles his slow descent. He starts by reminiscing about his 1950s and '60s San Francisco childhood, about the genetic aspects of such addictions (Lee's Chinese grandfather was sold as a young boy to pay off his own father's gambling debts), and about Lee's father's struggles with gambling. The author's own addictions flare up when he plays the stock market (which he persuasively describes as legalized gambling), and when he needs to escape the emotional pressures of his high-stress consulting job. After falling tens of thousands of dollars into debt, Lee finally finds the strength to attend a Gambler's Anonymous meeting, and the remainder of the book describes his difficult recovery. As a memoir of addiction, this work is hardly as lurid as some other, more popular chronicles. What sets it apart are the details about the ways in which Lee's Chinese heritage played into his addiction and healing, providing an unusual look at the issue. Agent, Susan Rabiner. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

"My history of gambling really began before I was born." So opens Born to Lose, Bill Lee's self-told story of gambling addiction, set in San Francisco's Chinatown and steeped in a culture where it is not unheard of for gamblers (Lee's grandfather included) to lose their children to a bet. From wagering away his beloved baseball card collection as a youngster to forfeiting everything he owned at black jack tables in Las Vegas, Lee describes what gambling addiction feels like from the inside and how recovery is possible through the Twelve Step program.

About the Author

Bill Lee is the author of Chinese Playground. He has also written numerous articles for the San Francisco Chronicle and Asian Week. Lee is the principal of Bill Lee & Associates, a senior management and technical search firm based in California. Lee has been featured on the History Channel, A&E Network, and in national print publications.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

smilesndeed, April 13, 2012 (view all comments by smilesndeed)
Painful and gritty. This book details the crushing world of gambling and a force which can be overwhelming to the victim involved.

Get this book and read it in the daylight hours, so you wont be too down when you finish it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781592851539
Author:
Lee, Bill
Publisher:
Hazelden Publishing & Educational Services
Location:
Center City
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Gambling - General
Subject:
Gamblers
Subject:
Substance Abuse & Addictions - General
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Substance Abuse
Subject:
Gamblers -- United States.
Subject:
Lee, Bill
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
April 2005
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
7.88 x 5.13 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Drug and Alcohol Addiction
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Money Addiction
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Personal Stories
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Gambling » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Born to Lose: Memoirs of a Compulsive Gambler Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Hazelden Publishing & Educational Services - English 9781592851539 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A gambling addiction can be as destructive and as life-altering as any other addiction, and former human resources exec and Lake Tahoe regular Lee has a story to prove it. Breezily written and compelling, Lee's book chronicles his slow descent. He starts by reminiscing about his 1950s and '60s San Francisco childhood, about the genetic aspects of such addictions (Lee's Chinese grandfather was sold as a young boy to pay off his own father's gambling debts), and about Lee's father's struggles with gambling. The author's own addictions flare up when he plays the stock market (which he persuasively describes as legalized gambling), and when he needs to escape the emotional pressures of his high-stress consulting job. After falling tens of thousands of dollars into debt, Lee finally finds the strength to attend a Gambler's Anonymous meeting, and the remainder of the book describes his difficult recovery. As a memoir of addiction, this work is hardly as lurid as some other, more popular chronicles. What sets it apart are the details about the ways in which Lee's Chinese heritage played into his addiction and healing, providing an unusual look at the issue. Agent, Susan Rabiner. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
"My history of gambling really began before I was born." So opens Born to Lose, Bill Lee's self-told story of gambling addiction, set in San Francisco's Chinatown and steeped in a culture where it is not unheard of for gamblers (Lee's grandfather included) to lose their children to a bet. From wagering away his beloved baseball card collection as a youngster to forfeiting everything he owned at black jack tables in Las Vegas, Lee describes what gambling addiction feels like from the inside and how recovery is possible through the Twelve Step program.
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