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The Picture of Dorian Gray

by

The Picture of Dorian Gray Cover

ISBN13: 9781593080259
ISBN10: 1593080255
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde, is part of the #LINK<Barnes & Noble Classics># series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
  • New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.
 
Oscar Wilde brings his enormous gifts for astute social observation and sparkling prose to The Picture of Dorian Gray, his dreamlike story of a young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty. This dandy, who remains forever unchanged—petulant, hedonistic, vain, and amoral—while a painting of him ages and grows increasingly hideous with the years, has been horrifying, enchanting, obsessing, even corrupting readers for more than a hundred years.

Taking the reader in and out of London drawing rooms, to the heights of aestheticism, and to the depths of decadence, The Picture of Dorian Gray is not only a melodrama about moral corruption. Laced with bon mots and vivid depictions of upper-class refinement, it is also a fascinating look at the milieu of Wildes fin-de-si&egrave;cle world and a manifesto of the creed “Art for Arts Sake.”

The ever-quotable Wilde, who once delighted London with his scintillating plays, scandalized readers with this, his only novel. Upon publication, Dorian was condemned as dangerous, poisonous, stupid, vulgar, and immoral, and Wilde as a “driveling pedant.” The novel, in fact, was used against Wilde at his much-publicized trials for “gross indecency,” which led to his imprisonment and exile on the European continent. Even so, The Picture of Dorian Gray firmly established Wilde as one of the great voices of the Aesthetic movement, and endures as a classic that is as timeless as its hero.

Camille Cauti, Ph.D., is an editor and literary critic who lives in New York City. She is a specialist in the Catholic conversion trend among members of the avant-garde in London in the 1890s.

Synopsis:

The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences--biographical, historical, and literary--to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. Oscar Wilde brings his enormous gifts for astute social observation and sparkling prose to The Picture of Dorian Gray, his dreamlike story of a young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty. This dandy, who remains forever unchanged--petulant, hedonistic, vain, and amoral--while a painting of him ages and grows increasingly hideous with the years, has been horrifying, enchanting, obsessing, even corrupting readers for more than a hundred years.

Taking the reader in and out of London drawing rooms, to the heights of aestheticism, and to thedepths of decadence, The Picture of Dorian Gray is not only a melodrama about moral corruption. Laced with bon mots and vivid depictions of upper-class refinement, it is also a fascinating look at the milieu of Wilde's fin-de-siecle world and a manifesto of the creed Art for Art's Sake.

The ever-quotable Wilde, who once delighted London with his scintillating plays, scandalized readers with this, his only novel. Upon publication, Dorian was condemned as dangerous, poisonous, stupid, vulgar, and immoral, and Wilde as a driveling pedant. The novel, in fact, was used against Wilde at his much-publicized trials for gross indecency, which led to his imprisonment and exile on the European continent. Even so, The Picture of Dorian Gray firmly established Wilde as one of the great voices of the Aesthetic movement, and endures as a classic that is as timeless as its hero.

Camille Cauti, Ph.D., is an editor and literary critic who lives in New York City. She is a specialist in the Catholic conversion trend among members of the avant-garde in London in the 1890s.

Synopsis:

Oscar Wilde brings his enormous gifts for astute social observation and sparkling prose to The Picture of Dorian Gray, his dreamlike story of a young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty. This dandy, who remains forever unchanged--petulant, hedonistic, vain, and amoral--while a painting of him ages and grows increasingly hideous with the years, has been horrifying, enchanting, obsessing, even corrupting readers for more than a hundred years. Taking the reader in and out of London drawing rooms, to the heights of aestheticism, and to the depths of decadence, The Picture of Dorian Gray is not only a melodrama about moral corruption. Laced with bon mots and vivid depictions of upper-class refinement, it is also a fascinating look at the milieu of Wilde's fin-de-siecle world and a manifesto of the creed Art for Art's Sake.

The ever-quotable Wilde, who once delighted London with his scintillating plays, scandalized readers with this, his only novel. Upon publication, Dorian was condemned as dangerous, poisonous, stupid, vulgar, and immoral, and Wilde as a driveling pedant. The novel, in fact, was used against Wilde at his much-publicized trials for gross indecency, which led to his imprisonment and exile on the European continent. Even so, The Picture of Dorian Gray firmly established Wilde as one of the great voices of the Aesthetic movement, and endures as a classic that is as timeless as its hero.

About the Author

Camille Cauti, Ph.D., is an editor and literary critic who lives in New York City. She is a specialist in the Catholic conversion trend among members of the avant-garde in London in the 1890s.

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Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

Hunter Smith, April 1, 2014 (view all comments by Hunter Smith)
The best way to determine the value of a book is to decide if it is enjoyable to read, and if it effectively portrays its main purpose. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde isn’t for everyone; however, I personally thought that the book was fairly good. It is told in third person limited point of view. The main character whose thoughts we are privileged to is Dorian Gray. The main characters in the novel include Dorian Gray, a painter named Basil Hallward, a philosopher named Lord Henry Wotton, and an actress named Sibyl Vane. There are several other minor characters but the main characters, Dorian Gray in particular, are the main focus of the novel. This book is classified in the genre of philosophical fiction; the witty lines and philosophical ideas provoke intense thought. While the story is meant to entertain, the main purpose of this novel is to comment on the destructive nature of vanity. I believe this is a good book but not in a reading for pleasure sense.
The Picture of Dorian Gray was written in the 19th century and was first published in a magazine in 1890. The novel is set in England, both in and around the London area. Most of the novel focuses on wealthy characters in the aristocracy. There were several shifts in the book where the author would flash forward in time a few years. The shifts helped to better portray Dorian Gray’s transformation. The novel includes several dull areas of excessive descriptions mixed in with intense, dramatic action scenes. Oscar Wilde writes in long flowing passages or quick, short and witty exchanges amongst two characters. Wilde’s style creates many instances of deep thought provoking material. The plot line of the novel isn’t only entertaining, but it also creates the deeper meaning of the book.
The novel’s plot consists of following Dorian Gray’s transformation. Dorian begins the novel as an innocent young man but he is swiftly transformed into a monster at the hands of Lord Henry. Basil Hallward paints a portrait of Dorian that ends up showing his transformation over time; when Dorian sins the portrait changes to reflect what he has done. As Dorian turn towards vanity, he is consumed until everything culminates in disaster. The main purpose of the novel is to comment on the destructive power of vanity. There are many instances in the book that reflect the vain and pleasure obsessed ideals that Lord Henry injects into Dorian Gray. “The only way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it” (21). This quote shows Lord Henry’s outlook on life. Dorian starts to change around the time he meets Sibyl Vane. Shortly after breaking off their engagement he says “There is always something ridiculous about the emotion of people whom one has ceased to love” (92). This quote reveals Dorian’s transformation into a cruel and self-absorbed monster. Oscar Wilde uses this transformation in order to comment on the destructive powers of vanity. Dorian goes from a joyful and carefree life, to one filled with anxiety and anger. Eventually Dorian destroys nearly everybody that he considers to be a friend and himself.
This book was eye opening for me and I truly believe that it could change a person’s life. Oscar Wilde does an outstanding job portraying the devastating effect vanity can have. The way Wilde reveals Dorian’s transformation through the painting and his manipulation of time emphasizes the dangers of a vanity. I myself enjoyed the novel for the most part. The only time I found myself disliking the experience was in the few sections of the novel lacking action. I would recommend this book to anybody who wishes to see the world from a different point of view, or to somebody trying to reform their life.
The Picture of Dorian Gray is an exceptional novel with a refreshing insightful view on vanity. The novel is written in 19th century London. It follows several members of the aristocracy, particularly Dorian Gray as he transforms from a radiant young man into a corrupted criminal. Once a person is consumed by vanity is there any way to escape its clutches?
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
Honeydew Annabell Leigh, March 22, 2012 (view all comments by Honeydew Annabell Leigh)
The Picture of Dorian Grey, by Oscar Wilde, features Dorian, a handsome young man, who meets Basil at a dinner party and is immediately drawn to him. Dorian becomes the muse for his paintings. One day, Basil tells Harry about his beautiful new friend, whom Harry insists on meeting. Harry talks to Dorian as Basil paints a striking portrait of Dorian. That day is a pivotal moment in Dorian’s character. Harry makes Dorian realize that nothing is worth more in this world than youth. Dorian declares that he would sell his soul if only the painting would age instead of him. After this promise comes true, Dorian begins to live his life under the strong influence of Harry and attempts to make the gap between his painting and his beauty wider through immoral actions which begin to tear apart his life as he is “jealous of everything whose beauty does not die” (29).
The consequences of focusing too much on beauty are communicated effectively throughout the book. Due to his good looks, Dorian escaped many troubles but eventually all his sins caught up with him. Dorian’s fatal flaw was false invincibility; this led him to his poor actions. Dorian allowed the painting to bare his sins for him. The painting captures “eternal youth, infinite passion, pleasures subtle and secret, wild joys and wilder sins” (109). This book shows the aesthetic idea of beauty for the sake of beauty can be valued. However, corruption occurs when too much emphasis is placed purely on beauty.
When this book was written, the aesthetic movement was highly influential. Beautiful objects allow one to escape their problems. Dorian diminishes the guilt of murder through a preoccupation with beautiful possessions. He alleviates his shame with “these treasures, and everything that he collected in his lovely house, were to be to him means of forgetfulness…for the fear that seemed to him at times to be almost too great to be borne” (143). But as Dorian demonstrates for the reader, beauty cannot distract emotions forever. Eventually, one must deal with their past actions.
Throughout the Picture of Dorian Grey, Oscar Wilde allows the reader to glimpse into the 19th century world, filled with beauty for beauty’s sake. Wilde leaves the reader with the idea that focusing immensely on beauty may be a dangerous obsession. This idea remains relevant today as beauty remains a highly esteemed characteristic in our modern materialistic society.
Homosexuality is a common theme in The Picture of Dorian Grey. Harry and Basil both greatly adore Dorian. Harry desires a “return to the Hellenic ideal-to something finer, richer, than the Hellenic ideal, if may be” (20). Also, in order to make Alan dispose of Basil, Dorian threatens him and one is lead to believe it is about a homosexual act. Wilde himself was homosexual, and believes that love between men was refined and accepted by past scholars. Alan’s suffering expresses how 19th century culture disapproved of these relationships causing shame and forcing him to hide his true feelings. Harry and Basil demonstrate as similar idea. As much as they may love Dorian, they are never able to act upon that love as society would greatly frown upon it.
The book gives the reader a greater understanding of 19th century culture. There was an enormous emphasis placed on beauty and attractive people had easier lives. In addition, there was a prominent belief that the beautiful looked good; therefore they could only do good. “Lord Henry [Harry] is very wicked, and I sometimes wish that I had been; but you are made to be good-you look so good” (184). Because Dorian is handsome, various opportunities are given to him and he bypasses numerous punishments.
Surprisingly, religion is never brought up in The Picture of Dorian Grey. Religion is ignored because of Wilde’s own beliefs. He believed in Christianity, but only converted on his deathbed as Wilde knew the conversion would force him to give up his homosexual relationships.
The Picture of Dorian Grey is highly recommended read. The plot is captivating, leaving the reader unable to stop, and it makes one think of how our society views beauty. The ideas stand the test of time, and the novel overall is still able to capture the reader. The Picture of Dorian Grey leaves the reader with an immense enjoyment and questions to ponder.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
Honeydew Annabell Leigh, March 22, 2012 (view all comments by Honeydew Annabell Leigh)
The Picture of Dorian Grey, by Oscar Wilde, features Dorian, a handsome young man, who meets Basil at a dinner party and is immediately drawn to him. Dorian becomes the muse for his paintings. One day, Basil tells Harry about his beautiful new friend, whom Harry insists on meeting. Harry talks to Dorian as Basil paints a striking portrait of Dorian. That day is a pivotal moment in Dorian’s character. Harry makes Dorian realize that nothing is worth more in this world than youth. Dorian declares that he would sell his soul if only the painting would age instead of him. After this promise comes true, Dorian begins to live his life under the strong influence of Harry and attempts to make the gap between his painting and his beauty wider through immoral actions which begin to tear apart his life as he is “jealous of everything whose beauty does not die” (29).
The consequences of focusing too much on beauty are communicated effectively throughout the book. Due to his good looks, Dorian escaped many troubles but eventually all his sins caught up with him. Dorian’s fatal flaw was false invincibility; this led him to his poor actions. Dorian allowed the painting to bare his sins for him. The painting captures “eternal youth, infinite passion, pleasures subtle and secret, wild joys and wilder sins” (109). This book shows the aesthetic idea of beauty for the sake of beauty can be valued. However, corruption occurs when too much emphasis is placed purely on beauty.
When this book was written, the aesthetic movement was highly influential. Beautiful objects allow one to escape their problems. Dorian diminishes the guilt of murder through a preoccupation with beautiful possessions. He alleviates his shame with “these treasures, and everything that he collected in his lovely house, were to be to him means of forgetfulness…for the fear that seemed to him at times to be almost too great to be borne” (143). But as Dorian demonstrates for the reader, beauty cannot distract emotions forever. Eventually, one must deal with their past actions.
Throughout the Picture of Dorian Grey, Oscar Wilde allows the reader to glimpse into the 19th century world, filled with beauty for beauty’s sake. Wilde leaves the reader with the idea that focusing immensely on beauty may be a dangerous obsession. This idea remains relevant today as beauty remains a highly esteemed characteristic in our modern materialistic society.
Homosexuality is a common theme in The Picture of Dorian Grey. Harry and Basil both greatly adore Dorian. Harry desires a “return to the Hellenic ideal-to something finer, richer, than the Hellenic ideal, if may be” (20). Also, in order to make Alan dispose of Basil, Dorian threatens him and one is lead to believe it is about a homosexual act. Wilde himself was homosexual, and believes that love between men was refined and accepted by past scholars. Alan’s suffering expresses how 19th century culture disapproved of these relationships causing shame and forcing him to hide his true feelings. Harry and Basil demonstrate as similar idea. As much as they may love Dorian, they are never able to act upon that love as society would greatly frown upon it.
The book gives the reader a greater understanding of 19th century culture. There was an enormous emphasis placed on beauty and attractive people had easier lives. In addition, there was a prominent belief that the beautiful looked good; therefore they could only do good. “Lord Henry [Harry] is very wicked, and I sometimes wish that I had been; but you are made to be good-you look so good” (184). Because Dorian is handsome, various opportunities are given to him and he bypasses numerous punishments.
Surprisingly, religion is never brought up in The Picture of Dorian Grey. Religion is ignored because of Wilde’s own beliefs. He believed in Christianity, but only converted on his deathbed as Wilde knew the conversion would force him to give up his homosexual relationships.
The Picture of Dorian Grey is highly recommended read. The plot is captivating, leaving the reader unable to stop, and it makes one think of how our society views beauty. The ideas stand the test of time, and the novel overall is still able to capture the reader. The Picture of Dorian Grey leaves the reader with an immense enjoyment and questions to ponder.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781593080259
Author:
Wilde, Oscar
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble Classics
Introduction by:
Cauti, Camille
Introduction:
Cauti, Camille
Illustrator:
Cauti, Camille
Author:
Cauti, Camille
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Soul
Subject:
Conduct of life
Subject:
Portraits
Subject:
Fables
Subject:
Future life
Subject:
Didactic fiction
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
LITERATURE - LIT CLASSICS TRD PB
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Barnes and Noble Classics
Series Volume:
62
Publication Date:
20030531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
, Y
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8 x 5.25 x 0.72 in

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Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Suspense

The Picture of Dorian Gray Used Trade Paper
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Product details 288 pages Barnes & Noble Books-Imports - English 9781593080259 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences--biographical, historical, and literary--to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. Oscar Wilde brings his enormous gifts for astute social observation and sparkling prose to The Picture of Dorian Gray, his dreamlike story of a young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty. This dandy, who remains forever unchanged--petulant, hedonistic, vain, and amoral--while a painting of him ages and grows increasingly hideous with the years, has been horrifying, enchanting, obsessing, even corrupting readers for more than a hundred years.

Taking the reader in and out of London drawing rooms, to the heights of aestheticism, and to thedepths of decadence, The Picture of Dorian Gray is not only a melodrama about moral corruption. Laced with bon mots and vivid depictions of upper-class refinement, it is also a fascinating look at the milieu of Wilde's fin-de-siecle world and a manifesto of the creed Art for Art's Sake.

The ever-quotable Wilde, who once delighted London with his scintillating plays, scandalized readers with this, his only novel. Upon publication, Dorian was condemned as dangerous, poisonous, stupid, vulgar, and immoral, and Wilde as a driveling pedant. The novel, in fact, was used against Wilde at his much-publicized trials for gross indecency, which led to his imprisonment and exile on the European continent. Even so, The Picture of Dorian Gray firmly established Wilde as one of the great voices of the Aesthetic movement, and endures as a classic that is as timeless as its hero.

Camille Cauti, Ph.D., is an editor and literary critic who lives in New York City. She is a specialist in the Catholic conversion trend among members of the avant-garde in London in the 1890s.

"Synopsis" by , Oscar Wilde brings his enormous gifts for astute social observation and sparkling prose to The Picture of Dorian Gray, his dreamlike story of a young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty. This dandy, who remains forever unchanged--petulant, hedonistic, vain, and amoral--while a painting of him ages and grows increasingly hideous with the years, has been horrifying, enchanting, obsessing, even corrupting readers for more than a hundred years. Taking the reader in and out of London drawing rooms, to the heights of aestheticism, and to the depths of decadence, The Picture of Dorian Gray is not only a melodrama about moral corruption. Laced with bon mots and vivid depictions of upper-class refinement, it is also a fascinating look at the milieu of Wilde's fin-de-siecle world and a manifesto of the creed Art for Art's Sake.

The ever-quotable Wilde, who once delighted London with his scintillating plays, scandalized readers with this, his only novel. Upon publication, Dorian was condemned as dangerous, poisonous, stupid, vulgar, and immoral, and Wilde as a driveling pedant. The novel, in fact, was used against Wilde at his much-publicized trials for gross indecency, which led to his imprisonment and exile on the European continent. Even so, The Picture of Dorian Gray firmly established Wilde as one of the great voices of the Aesthetic movement, and endures as a classic that is as timeless as its hero.

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