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The Edifice Complex: How the Rich and Powerful Shape the World

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The Edifice Complex: How the Rich and Powerful Shape the World Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From one of the world's premier architecture critics, a groundbreaking dissection of how the colossal egos of the powerful and wealthy determine what actually gets built--of the real reasons why we build.

Architecture critics most often write about buildings as a form of art, promulgating an "auteur theory" of architecture that focuses on the dazzling brilliance of the big names, such as Rem Koolhaas and Frank Gehry, and underplaying the role of the wealthy and powerful in forcing the architects' hands. Deyan Sudjic puts forth a boldly contrarian view. Architecture must be understood as an expression of power and as a weapon, or form of propaganda, that is used in ways both subtle and grandiose as a means of achieving and maintaining power--of carving a legacy out of glass, steel, and stone.

While most architecture books focus on a certain building or a specific architect, The Edifice Complex takes a wide-angle look at a fascinating range of buildings and large-scale building schemes--both the impressively effective and the disastrously ill conceived. In a lively and wonderfully accessible narrative style, Sudjic takes readers behind the scenes of the stories of the great political manipulators of architecture in the twentieth century, from the great dictators of fascism--Hitler, Mussolini, and Stalin--and their megalomaniacal plans for rebuilding Berlin, Rome, and Moscow, to power-broker businessmen such as Nelson Rockefeller; and from the "theme park" propaganda of the presidential libraries to the vainglorious symbolism of Saddam Hussein's Mother of All Battles Mosque. While some leaders have used architecture as a means of consolidating control over a nation, others have employed architecture to shape a new national identity, as Ataturk did to a large degree of success in Turkey and the shahs attempted and failed to do in Iran.

But what of the architects? Sudjic also examines the role they play in lending their talents to these efforts, from those who have all too willingly aided and abetted, such as Albert Speer, to those who have courted the powerful while remaining true to their art, such as Mies van der Rohe.

The Edifice Complex offers a brilliant reinterpretation of the role of buildings in our lives and of the age-old question why we build.

Review:

"Everything is political, especially architecture, Sudjic demonstrates in this provocative consideration of the world's most notable architectural triumphs and the masters who commissioned them. From Stalin to Mitterrand to Saddam Hussein, argues Sudjic, 'architecture is used by political leaders to seduce, to impress and to intimidate.' The evidence is all around us, he says, even in the attack on New York City's Twin Towers, which he views as 'a literal acceptance of the iconic power of architecture.' Zipping through pre-Partition Pakistan, Nazi Germany, modern-day New York and back, Sudjic shows how buildings are employed to demonstrate a state's power, to build a nation's cultural identity and to assure leaders that their legacies are both admirable and memorable. As for the architects who design such iconic structures — from Hitler's confidant Albert Speer to ground zero's 'therapist' Daniel Libeskind — Sudjic reveals that they often have motivations that are startlingly distinct from those who hire them. Sudjic's research is thorough, and his prose lively and sharp. But his accounts can be meandering and chaotic, jumping in one instance from Malaysia's Petronas Towers to the background of a September 11 suicide bomber. Architecture connoisseurs will appreciate the gossipy histories and the original lines of thought, but readers less familiar with the subject may feel dizzied by Sudjik's erudite collages." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Architect critic for London's Observer newspaper, Sudjic argues that architecture must be understood primarily not as an art, but as an expression of power over a landscape that will last far longer than any person, and is so used as a unique instrument of statecraft. Taking a number of high-profile architects of the present and recent past as case studies, he shows how massive building projects are used to glorify or intimidate as an instrument of nation building, an expression of ego, or a bid for immortality.
Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

Architect critic for London's Observer newspaper, Sudjic argues that architecture must be understood primarily not as an art, but as an expression of power over a landscape that will last far longer than any person, and is so used as a unique instrument of statecraft. Taking a number of high-profile architects of the present and recent past as case studies, he shows how massive building projects are used to glorify or intimidate as an instrument of nation building, an expression of ego, or a bid for immortality. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

A provocative look at architecture-"exceptionally intelligent and original" (Jonathan Yardley, The Washington Post Book World)

Deyan Sudjic-"probably the most influential figure in architecture you've never heard of" - argues that architecture, far from being auteur art, must be understood as a naked expression of power. From the grandiose projects of Stalin and Hitler to the "theme park" excess of today's presidential libraries, Sudjic goes behind the scenes of history's great manipulators of building propaganda-and exposes Rem Koolhaas, Frank Gehry, and other architects in a disturbing new light. This controversial book is essential reading for all those interested in the power of architecture-or the architecture of power.

* A Washington Post Book World Best Book of the Year

About the Author

Deyan Sudjic has been the architecture critic of The Observer newspaper in London since 2000. After graduating with an architecture degree from the University of Edinburgh, he established Blueprint magazine, an international monthly review of architecture and design that broke new ground by covering the entire spectrum of design disciplines. He also edits the Italian magazine Domus and is the author of many previous books on architecture.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594200687
Subtitle:
How the Rich and Powerful--and Their Architects--Shape the World
Author:
Sudjic, Deyan
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
General
Subject:
Criticism
Subject:
Public, Commercial, or Industrial Buildings
Subject:
Power (Social sciences)
Subject:
Public architecture
Subject:
History
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20061128
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
9.30x6.62x1.30 in. 1.48 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Drafting
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Drawing and Design
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

The Edifice Complex: How the Rich and Powerful Shape the World Used Hardcover
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$8.50 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Penguin Press - English 9781594200687 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Everything is political, especially architecture, Sudjic demonstrates in this provocative consideration of the world's most notable architectural triumphs and the masters who commissioned them. From Stalin to Mitterrand to Saddam Hussein, argues Sudjic, 'architecture is used by political leaders to seduce, to impress and to intimidate.' The evidence is all around us, he says, even in the attack on New York City's Twin Towers, which he views as 'a literal acceptance of the iconic power of architecture.' Zipping through pre-Partition Pakistan, Nazi Germany, modern-day New York and back, Sudjic shows how buildings are employed to demonstrate a state's power, to build a nation's cultural identity and to assure leaders that their legacies are both admirable and memorable. As for the architects who design such iconic structures — from Hitler's confidant Albert Speer to ground zero's 'therapist' Daniel Libeskind — Sudjic reveals that they often have motivations that are startlingly distinct from those who hire them. Sudjic's research is thorough, and his prose lively and sharp. But his accounts can be meandering and chaotic, jumping in one instance from Malaysia's Petronas Towers to the background of a September 11 suicide bomber. Architecture connoisseurs will appreciate the gossipy histories and the original lines of thought, but readers less familiar with the subject may feel dizzied by Sudjik's erudite collages." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
A provocative look at architecture-"exceptionally intelligent and original" (Jonathan Yardley, The Washington Post Book World)

Deyan Sudjic-"probably the most influential figure in architecture you've never heard of" - argues that architecture, far from being auteur art, must be understood as a naked expression of power. From the grandiose projects of Stalin and Hitler to the "theme park" excess of today's presidential libraries, Sudjic goes behind the scenes of history's great manipulators of building propaganda-and exposes Rem Koolhaas, Frank Gehry, and other architects in a disturbing new light. This controversial book is essential reading for all those interested in the power of architecture-or the architecture of power.

* A Washington Post Book World Best Book of the Year

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