Summer Reading Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lisa Howorth: IMG So Many Books, So Many Writers



I'm not a bookseller, but I'm married to one, and Square Books is a family. And we all know about families and how hard it is to disassociate... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$14.00
List price: $27.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
11 Partner Warehouse General- General

Inherent Vice

by

Inherent Vice Cover

ISBN13: 9781594202247
ISBN10: 1594202249
Condition: Student Owned
All Product Details

 

Awards

The Rooster 2010 Morning News Tournament of Books Nominee

Staff Pick

I'm no pro from Dover, but I think that there are as many ways of looking at a work by Pynchon as he has storylines in each book. Inherent Vice is definitely one of the more approachable works by a guy who can have the reader wading hip-deep through unbelievably complex prose on one hand and up to your nose in Indica, weapons, and cartoonish character names on the other. On a general level, it'd be easy to say it's closely akin to the other "California" pieces (The Crying of Lot 49 and Vineland), much more so than the sprawling tomes of Against the Day or Mason and Dixon (for page count alone — phew!) or the byzantine plots of V and Gravity's Rainbow.

If I cut out every third word from Inherent Vice and paste it into another book, I'd come up with Cheech and Chong's encyclopedia of '70s L.A. Now I cut out every second word and I have a post-retro-détournement of a serpentine, techie noir, William Gibson-esque thriller. And what I'm left with reminds me of the resonant emotion, individuality, and very personal tone of the likes of Haruki Murakami. But, ultimately, Pynchon's voice is always his own.
Recommended by Jeff G., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Part noir, part psychedelic romp, and all Pynchon, Inherent Vice spotlights private eye Doc Sportello who occasionally comes out of a marijuana haze to watch the end of an era, as free love slips away and paranoia creeps in with the L.A. fog.

It's been awhile since Doc Sportello has seen his ex-girlfriend. Suddenly out of nowhere she shows up with a story about a plot to kidnap a billionaire land developer whom she just happens to be in love with. Easy for her to say. It's the tail end of the psychedelic sixties in L.A., and Doc knows that "love" is another of those words going around at the moment, like "trip" or "groovy," except that this one usually leads to trouble. Despite which, he soon finds himself drawn into a bizarre tangle of motives and passions whose cast of characters includes surfers, hustlers, dopers, and rockers, a murderous loan shark, a tenor sax player working undercover, an ex-con with a swastika tattoo and a fondness for Ethel Merman, and a mysterious entity known as the Golden Fang, which may only be a tax dodge set up by some dentists.

In this lively yarn, Thomas Pynchon, working in an unaccustomed genre, provides a classic illustration of the principle that if you can remember the sixties, you weren't there... or... if you were there, then you... or, wait, is it...

Review:

For more than 45 years, Thomas Pynchon has been the hidden god of modern letters, rarely photographed, never interviewed, but nonetheless revered and worshiped, his name pronounced by the devoted with a hiccup of pure awe: Thomas, gulp, Pynchon. Fans even collect the few books for which he has given a dust-jacket blurb. Every word of the Master is precious.

Nonetheless, Pynchon has... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[Pynchon] applies language to what we know and all we've missed — giving new shape to both.... The book is exuberant, delightfully evocative of its era, and very funny." O Magazine

Review:

"[M]aster writer Pynchon has created a bawdy, hilarious, and compassionate electric-acid-noir satire spiked with passages of startling beauty." Booklist

Review:

"[A] slightly spoofy take on hardboiled crime fiction, a story in which the characters smoke dope and watch Gilligan's Island instead of sitting around a night club knocking back J&Bs." New Yorker

Review:

"With whip-smart, psychedelic-bright language, Pynchon manages to convey the Sixties — except the Sixties were never really like this. This is Pynchon's world, and it's brilliant." Library Journal

Review:

"Inherent Vice feels fizzily spontaneous — like a series of jazz solos, scenes, and conversations built around little riffs of language." Newsweek

Synopsis:

Part noir, part psychedelic romp, and all Pynchon, Inherent Vice spotlights private eye Doc Sportello who occasionally comes out of a marijuana haze to watch the end of an era, as the free love of the 1960s slips away and paranoia creeps in with the L.A. fog.

Synopsis:

Unabridged CDs ? 13 CDs, 15 hours

Part noir, part psychedelic romp, all Thomas Pynchon-private eye Doc Sportello comes, occasionally, out of a marijuana haze to watch the end of an era as free love slips away and paranoia creeps in with the L. A. fog.

Synopsis:

Part noir, part psychedelic romp, all Thomas Pynchon- private eye Doc Sportello comes, occasionally, out of a marijuana haze to watch the end of an era as free love slips away and paranoia creeps in with the L.A. fog

It's been awhile since Doc Sportello has seen his ex-girlfriend. Suddenly out of nowhere she shows up with a story about a plot to kidnap a billionaire land developer whom she just happens to be in love with. Easy for her to say. It's the tail end of the psychedelic sixties in L.A., and Doc knows that "love" is another of those words going around at the moment, like "trip" or "groovy," except that this one usually leads to trouble. Despite which he soon finds himself drawn into a bizarre tangle of motives and passions whose cast of characters includes surfers, hustlers, dopers and rockers, a murderous loan shark, a tenor sax player working undercover, an ex-con with a swastika tattoo and a fondness for Ethel Merman, and a mysterious entity known as the Golden Fang, which may only be a tax dodge set up by some dentists.

In this lively yarn, Thomas Pynchon, working in an unaccustomed genre, provides a classic illustration of the principle that if you can remember the sixties, you weren't there . . . or . . . if you were there, then you . . . or, wait, is it . . .

Video

About the Author

Thomas Pynchon is the author of V, The Crying of Lot 49, Gravity's Rainbow, Slow Learner (a collection of short stories), Vineland, Mason and Dixon and, most recently, Against the Day. He received the National Book Award for Gravity's Rainbow in 1974.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

Katsuya, December 28, 2012 (view all comments by Katsuya)
I really enjoyed this book and think that anyone who likes Elmore Leonard or Raymond Chandler would find this book a blast. It also could be the book for all of you interested in social history; with a need to find out what caused something to turn from a dream into now a nightmare.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Ryan Carter, April 22, 2010 (view all comments by Ryan Carter)
I keep falling asleep (this is in no way a reflection on the book. I just happen to pick it up late at night) while reading this, but I'm pretty sure it enhances the whole" Whoa, I'm a stoner...what's happening?" vibe Doc has going for him.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(5 of 10 readers found this comment helpful)
Donald Hackett, January 14, 2010 (view all comments by Donald Hackett)
So what if Pynchon is imitating himself. So what if the story sags about two-thirds of the way through. So what if I keep seeing the protagonist as Freewheeling Frank from The Furry Freak Brothers. So what if it's not Wolf Hall, Lark and Termite, Tinkers, or 2666. So what if I'm a victim of hippy nostalgia--wanting to remember being that high, that much sex, or adventures that interesting.

This book made me laugh at the madness of the world we live in--the same madness that made me want to cry in 2666, but seen from the other side of the mirror. Paranoia is heightened awarenss.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(7 of 15 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594202247
Subtitle:
A Novel (Movie Tie-in)
Author:
Pynchon, Thomas
Author:
Winston, Robert P.
Author:
McLarty, Ron
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Experimental fiction
Subject:
Private investigators
Subject:
Noir fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20141028
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
17-17

Other books you might like

  1. Nobody Move
    Used Hardcover $3.95
  2. Drown
    Used Trade Paper $6.50
  3. Home Safe Used Trade Paper $4.95
  4. The Dharma Bums
    Used Mass Market $3.95
  5. The Magicians
    Used Hardcover $7.50
  6. The Story of a Million Years Used Hardcover $9.95

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Inherent Vice Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.00 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Penguin Press - English 9781594202247 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

I'm no pro from Dover, but I think that there are as many ways of looking at a work by Pynchon as he has storylines in each book. Inherent Vice is definitely one of the more approachable works by a guy who can have the reader wading hip-deep through unbelievably complex prose on one hand and up to your nose in Indica, weapons, and cartoonish character names on the other. On a general level, it'd be easy to say it's closely akin to the other "California" pieces (The Crying of Lot 49 and Vineland), much more so than the sprawling tomes of Against the Day or Mason and Dixon (for page count alone — phew!) or the byzantine plots of V and Gravity's Rainbow.

If I cut out every third word from Inherent Vice and paste it into another book, I'd come up with Cheech and Chong's encyclopedia of '70s L.A. Now I cut out every second word and I have a post-retro-détournement of a serpentine, techie noir, William Gibson-esque thriller. And what I'm left with reminds me of the resonant emotion, individuality, and very personal tone of the likes of Haruki Murakami. But, ultimately, Pynchon's voice is always his own.

"Review" by , "[Pynchon] applies language to what we know and all we've missed — giving new shape to both.... The book is exuberant, delightfully evocative of its era, and very funny." O Magazine
"Review" by , "[M]aster writer Pynchon has created a bawdy, hilarious, and compassionate electric-acid-noir satire spiked with passages of startling beauty."
"Review" by , "[A] slightly spoofy take on hardboiled crime fiction, a story in which the characters smoke dope and watch Gilligan's Island instead of sitting around a night club knocking back J&Bs."
"Review" by , "With whip-smart, psychedelic-bright language, Pynchon manages to convey the Sixties — except the Sixties were never really like this. This is Pynchon's world, and it's brilliant."
"Review" by , "Inherent Vice feels fizzily spontaneous — like a series of jazz solos, scenes, and conversations built around little riffs of language."
"Synopsis" by , Part noir, part psychedelic romp, and all Pynchon, Inherent Vice spotlights private eye Doc Sportello who occasionally comes out of a marijuana haze to watch the end of an era, as the free love of the 1960s slips away and paranoia creeps in with the L.A. fog.
"Synopsis" by ,
Unabridged CDs ? 13 CDs, 15 hours

Part noir, part psychedelic romp, all Thomas Pynchon-private eye Doc Sportello comes, occasionally, out of a marijuana haze to watch the end of an era as free love slips away and paranoia creeps in with the L. A. fog.

"Synopsis" by ,
Part noir, part psychedelic romp, all Thomas Pynchon- private eye Doc Sportello comes, occasionally, out of a marijuana haze to watch the end of an era as free love slips away and paranoia creeps in with the L.A. fog

It's been awhile since Doc Sportello has seen his ex-girlfriend. Suddenly out of nowhere she shows up with a story about a plot to kidnap a billionaire land developer whom she just happens to be in love with. Easy for her to say. It's the tail end of the psychedelic sixties in L.A., and Doc knows that "love" is another of those words going around at the moment, like "trip" or "groovy," except that this one usually leads to trouble. Despite which he soon finds himself drawn into a bizarre tangle of motives and passions whose cast of characters includes surfers, hustlers, dopers and rockers, a murderous loan shark, a tenor sax player working undercover, an ex-con with a swastika tattoo and a fondness for Ethel Merman, and a mysterious entity known as the Golden Fang, which may only be a tax dodge set up by some dentists.

In this lively yarn, Thomas Pynchon, working in an unaccustomed genre, provides a classic illustration of the principle that if you can remember the sixties, you weren't there . . . or . . . if you were there, then you . . . or, wait, is it . . .

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.