Magnificent Marvel Supersale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Beyond the Headlines | March 6, 2015

    Rhianna Walton: IMG Beyond the Headlines: How to Visit Cuba



    Ever since President Obama's December announcement that the United States is resuming full diplomatic ties with Cuba, the Powell's buyers' office... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$19.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Native American- General Native American Studies

Other titles in the Penguin History American Life series:

This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made (Penguin History American Life)

by

This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made (Penguin History American Life) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Frederick E. Hoxie, one of our most prominent and celebrated academic historians of Native American history, has for years asked his undergraduate students at the beginning of each semester to write down the names of three American Indians. Almost without exception, year after year, the names are Geronimo, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. The general conclusion is inescapable: Most Americans instinctively view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. These three individuals were warriors, men who fought violently against American expansion, lost, and died. It’s taken as given that Native history has no particular relationship to what is conventionally presented as the story of America. Indians had a history too; but theirs was short and sad, and it ended a long time ago. 

In This Indian Country, Hoxie has created a bold and sweeping counter-narrative to our conventional understanding. Native American history, he argues, is also a story of political activism, its victories hard-won in courts and campaigns rather than on the battlefield. For more than two hundred years, Indian activists—some famous, many unknown beyond their own communities—have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the republican democracy of the United States through legal and political debate. Over time their struggle defined a new language of “Indian rights” and created a vision of American Indian identity. In the process, they entered a dialogue with other activist movements, from African American civil rights to women’s rights and other progressive organizations.

Hoxie weaves a powerful narrative that connects the individual to the tribe, the tribe to the nation, and the nation to broader historical processes. He asks readers to think deeply about how a country based on the values of liberty and equality managed to adapt to the complex cultural and political demands of people who refused to be overrun or ignored. As we grapple with contemporary challenges to national institutions, from inside and outside our borders, and as we reflect on the array of shifting national and cultural identities across the globe, This Indian Country provides a context and a language for understanding our present dilemmas.

Review:

"From the early 19th through the late 20th century, U.S. policy toward Native Americans unfolded in three stages: wars and often violent removal from the east to the west; concentration in reservations and the attempt to 'civilize' 'an inferior and dependent race'; and the granting of only limited tribal self-governance. University of Illinois historian Hoxie (Talking Back to Civilization) profiles eight Native American lawyers, lobbyists, writers, and politicians who 'chose to oppose the oppressions of the United States with words and ideas rather than violence.' Mid-19th-century leader William Potter Ross, the son of a Scottish father and Cherokee mother, was a Princeton graduate who negotiated with the Union Pacific Railroad over its claims to tribal lands, and insisted on tribal legal autonomy. The writings of late-19th-century Paiute polemicist Sarah Winnemucca sharply challenged the paternalistic policies of 'the Indian office and its ideology of progress.' Hoxie's best chapter is on the Sioux lawyer and writer Vine Deloria Jr., who wrote that Native Americans should see themselves as 'American Indians' not as assimilated 'Indian Americans' and argued that U.S. policies should forward Indian self-governance. This is an important, well-written, and thoroughly documented work about Native American leaders, who, while lesser known, are no less important." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Frederick E. Hoxie is the Swanlund Professor of History and a professor of law at the University of Illinois, where he specializes in Native American history. He is the author of several books, most recently Talking Back to Civilization. He served as the general editor of The American Indians, a twenty-three-volume series that has sold more than two million copies, and as the series editor (with Neal Salisbury) for Cambridge Studies in American Indian History. Professor Hoxie is a founding trustee of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian and a former president of the American Society for Ethnohistory. He received his undergraduate degree from Amherst College and his Ph.D. from Brandeis University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594203657
Subtitle:
American Indian Activists and the Place They Made (Penguin History American Life)
Author:
Hoxie, Frederick
Publisher:
Penguin Press
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - General
Subject:
Jokes & riddles
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection
Subject:
Native American
Subject:
Native American-General Native American Studies
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Penguin History American Life
Publication Date:
20121031
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
496
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

Other books you might like

  1. Treasures of the National Museum of... Used Hardcover $5.50
  2. Here First: Autobiographical Essays... New Trade Paper $23.00

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » General
History and Social Science » Americana » General
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » General

This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made (Penguin History American Life) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.95 In Stock
Product details 496 pages Penguin Press - English 9781594203657 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "From the early 19th through the late 20th century, U.S. policy toward Native Americans unfolded in three stages: wars and often violent removal from the east to the west; concentration in reservations and the attempt to 'civilize' 'an inferior and dependent race'; and the granting of only limited tribal self-governance. University of Illinois historian Hoxie (Talking Back to Civilization) profiles eight Native American lawyers, lobbyists, writers, and politicians who 'chose to oppose the oppressions of the United States with words and ideas rather than violence.' Mid-19th-century leader William Potter Ross, the son of a Scottish father and Cherokee mother, was a Princeton graduate who negotiated with the Union Pacific Railroad over its claims to tribal lands, and insisted on tribal legal autonomy. The writings of late-19th-century Paiute polemicist Sarah Winnemucca sharply challenged the paternalistic policies of 'the Indian office and its ideology of progress.' Hoxie's best chapter is on the Sioux lawyer and writer Vine Deloria Jr., who wrote that Native Americans should see themselves as 'American Indians' not as assimilated 'Indian Americans' and argued that U.S. policies should forward Indian self-governance. This is an important, well-written, and thoroughly documented work about Native American leaders, who, while lesser known, are no less important." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.