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Other titles in the Penguin History American Life series:

The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America (Penguin History American Life)

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The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America (Penguin History American Life) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The late nineteenth century was a period of explosive technological creativity, but arguably the most important invention of all was Thomas Edison’s incandescent lightbulb. Unveiled in his Menlo Park, New Jersey, laboratory in 1879, the lightbulb overwhelmed the American public with the sense of the birth of a new age. More than any other invention, the electric light marked the arrival of modernity.

The lightbulb became a catalyst for the nation’s transformation from a rural to an urban-dominated culture. City streetlights defined zones between rich and poor, and the electrical grid sharpened the line between town and country. “Bright lights” meant “big city.” Like moths to a flame, millions of Americans migrated to urban centers in these decades, leaving behind the shadow of candle and kerosene lamp in favor of the exciting brilliance of the urban streetscape.

The Age of Edison places the story of Edison’s invention in the context of a technological revolution that transformed America and Europe in these decades. Edison and his fellow inventors emerged from a culture shaped by broad public education, a lively popular press that took an interest in science and technology, and an American patent system that encouraged innovation and democratized the benefits of invention. And in the end, as Freeberg shows, Edison’s greatest invention was not any single technology, but rather his reinvention of the process itself. At Menlo Park he gathered the combination of capital, scientific training, and engineering skill that would evolve into the modern research and development laboratory. His revolutionary electrical grid not only broke the stronghold of gas companies, but also ushered in an era when strong, clear light could become accessible to everyone.

In The Age of Edison, Freeberg weaves a narrative that reaches from Coney Island and Broadway to the tiniest towns of rural America, tracing the progress of electric light through the reactions of everyone who saw it. It is a quintessentially American story of ingenuity, ambition, and possibility, in which the greater forces of progress and change are made visible by one of our most humble and ubiquitous objects.

Review:

"In his illuminating newest, Freeberg, a professor of humanities at the University of Tennessee, examines the social, technological, and political context surrounding the development of the electric light bulb and its transformative effects on American society. Though numerous early thinkers and innovators drove the technology to fruition, Freeberg (Democracy's Prisoner) demonstrates that it was Thomas Edison who, by founding the Edison Electric Light Company, established a modern industrial approach that synthesized scientific collaboration, entrepreneurship, and salesmanship in the development of a 'complete lighting system' that could power an 'incandescent bulb of superior design.' In effect, he democratized light. The excitement spread quickly, but Americans were torn: some celebrated while others reviled the undeniable ways in which their work and leisure life would be dramatically changed. Though most saw this innovation as a sign of human advancement and enlightenment, electric lighting was criticized by gas companies (for obvious reasons), labor groups, and cultural figures that saw in the ubiquity of illumination a frightful, unnatural way of life. Even though he would live to see his own innovations and patents made exponentially more productive and efficient, the 'Wizard of Menlo Park' came to embody 'a vanishing heroic age of invention' that 'laid the foundation of modern America.' Illus." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A sweeping history of the electric light revolution and the birth of modern America

 

The late nineteenth century was a period of explosive technological creativity, but more than any other invention, Thomas Edisons incandescent light bulb marked the arrival of modernity, transforming its inventor into a mythic figure and avatar of an era. In The Age of Edison, award-winning author and historian Ernest Freeberg weaves a narrative that reaches from Coney Island and Broadway to the tiniest towns of rural America, tracing the progress of electric light through the reactions of everyone who saw it and capturing the wonder Edisons invention inspired. It is a quintessentially American story of ingenuity, ambition, and possibility in which the greater forces of progress and change are made by one of our most humble and ubiquitous objects.

About the Author

Ernest Freeberg is a distinguished professor of humanities in the history department at the University of Tennessee. He is the author of The Education of Laura Bridgman and Democracy’s Prisoner, which was a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist and winner of the David J. Langum, Sr. Prize in American Legal History and the Eli M. Oboler Award from the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Roundtable. Freeberg is a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians and has produced a number of public radio documentaries on historical themes.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594204265
Author:
Freeberg, Ernest
Publisher:
Penguin Press
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
US History-General
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Series:
Penguin History American Life
Publication Date:
20130231
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16-pg B and W insert
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » General
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History and Social Science » US History » 1860 to 1920
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
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Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » General
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » New Arrivals
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » Technology

The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America (Penguin History American Life) Used Hardcover
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$19.50 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Penguin Press - English 9781594204265 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In his illuminating newest, Freeberg, a professor of humanities at the University of Tennessee, examines the social, technological, and political context surrounding the development of the electric light bulb and its transformative effects on American society. Though numerous early thinkers and innovators drove the technology to fruition, Freeberg (Democracy's Prisoner) demonstrates that it was Thomas Edison who, by founding the Edison Electric Light Company, established a modern industrial approach that synthesized scientific collaboration, entrepreneurship, and salesmanship in the development of a 'complete lighting system' that could power an 'incandescent bulb of superior design.' In effect, he democratized light. The excitement spread quickly, but Americans were torn: some celebrated while others reviled the undeniable ways in which their work and leisure life would be dramatically changed. Though most saw this innovation as a sign of human advancement and enlightenment, electric lighting was criticized by gas companies (for obvious reasons), labor groups, and cultural figures that saw in the ubiquity of illumination a frightful, unnatural way of life. Even though he would live to see his own innovations and patents made exponentially more productive and efficient, the 'Wizard of Menlo Park' came to embody 'a vanishing heroic age of invention' that 'laid the foundation of modern America.' Illus." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
A sweeping history of the electric light revolution and the birth of modern America

 

The late nineteenth century was a period of explosive technological creativity, but more than any other invention, Thomas Edisons incandescent light bulb marked the arrival of modernity, transforming its inventor into a mythic figure and avatar of an era. In The Age of Edison, award-winning author and historian Ernest Freeberg weaves a narrative that reaches from Coney Island and Broadway to the tiniest towns of rural America, tracing the progress of electric light through the reactions of everyone who saw it and capturing the wonder Edisons invention inspired. It is a quintessentially American story of ingenuity, ambition, and possibility in which the greater forces of progress and change are made by one of our most humble and ubiquitous objects.

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