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2 Burnside Science Reference- Sociology of Science

Uncharted: Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture

by

Uncharted: Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“One of the most exciting developments from the world of ideas in decades, presented with panache by two frighteningly brilliant, endearingly unpretentious, and endlessly creative young scientists.” – Steven Pinker, author of The Better Angels of Our Nature

Our society has gone from writing snippets of information by hand to generating a vast flood of 1s and 0s that record almost every aspect of our lives: who we know, what we do, where we go, what we buy, and who we love. This year, the world will generate 5 zettabytes of data. (Thats a five with twenty-one zeros after it.) Big data is revolutionizing the sciences, transforming the humanities, and renegotiating the boundary between industry and the ivory tower.

 

What is emerging is a new way of understanding our world, our past, and possibly, our future. In Uncharted, Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel tell the story of how they tapped into this sea of information to create a new kind of telescope: a tool that, instead of uncovering the motions of distant stars, charts trends in human history across the centuries. By teaming up with Google, they were able to analyze the text of millions of books. The result was a new field of research and a scientific tool, the Google Ngram Viewer, so groundbreaking that its public release made the front page of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Boston Globe, and so addictive that Mother Jones called it “the greatest timewaster in the history of the internet.”

 

Using this scope, Aiden and Michel—and millions of users worldwide—are beginning to see answers to a dizzying array of once intractable questions. How quickly does technology spread? Do we talk less about God today? When did people start “having sex” instead of “making love”? At what age do the most famous people become famous? How fast does grammar change? Which writers had their works most effectively censored by the Nazis? When did the spelling “donut” start replacing the venerable “doughnut”? Can we predict the future of human history? Who is better known—Bill Clinton or the rutabaga?

 

All over the world, new scopes are popping up, using big data to quantify the human experience at the grandest scales possible. Yet dangers lurk in this ocean of 1s and 0s—threats to privacy and the specter of ubiquitous government surveillance. Aiden and Michel take readers on a voyage through these uncharted waters.

Review:

"Aiden and Michel gained widespread media attention when they first demonstrated their innovative use of the Google Books project, which made available more than 30 million books in digitized form — about one in every four books published. This 'big data' is at the core of this fascinating glimpse into the pair's decade-long work and how 'n the coming decades, personal, digital, and historical records are going to totally transform the way we think about ourselves and the world around us.' Using a new scientific tool specially designed to be used with Google Books, the Ngram viewer, the pair were able to count words for 'track certain kinds of cultural change over time' and to make 'careful measurements that probe important aspects of our history, language, and culture.' The result is like using a new kind of telescope that allows one to see more closely — and accurately — the evolution of words and how this reflects cultural change. A long appendix of charts provides a range of fascinating Ngram-based insights as well — such as the fact that the word 'data' over the past hundred years has become more commonly used than the word 'God.' (Dec.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Breaking open Big Data, two Harvard scientists reveal a ground-breaking way of looking at history and culture.

One of the greatest untapped resources of today isnt offshore oil or natural gas—its data. Gigabytes, exabytes (thats one quintillion bytes) of data are sitting on servers across the world. So how can we start to access this explosion of information, this “big data,” and what can it tell us?

 

Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel are two young scientists at Harvard who started to ask those questions. They teamed up with Google to create the Ngram Viewer, a Web-based tool that can chart words throughout the massive Google Books archive, sifting through billions of words to find fascinating cultural trends. On the day that the Ngram Viewer debuted in 2010, more than one million queries were run through it.

 

On the front lines of Big Data, Aiden and Michel realized that this big dataset—the Google Books archive that contains remarkable information on the human experience—had huge implications for looking at our shared human history. The tool they developed to delve into the data has enabled researchers to track how our language has evolved over time, how art has been censored, how fame can grow and fade, how nations trend toward war. How we remember and how we forget. And ultimately, how Big Data is changing the game for the sciences, humanities, politics, business, and our culture.

About the Author

Erez Aiden is a Fellow at the Harvard Society and a former visiting faculty member at Google. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from Barack Obama. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Jean-Baptiste Michel is a French and Mauritian scientist at Harvard University and a former visiting faculty member at Google. He was a 2012 TED Fellow and recently named one of Forbes “30 under 30.” He lives in New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594487453
Author:
Aiden, Erez
Publisher:
Riverhead Books a Member of Penguin Group (US
Author:
Michel, Jean-Baptiste
Subject:
History
Subject:
Sociology - General
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20131231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
bandw graphs throughout
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Sale Books
Computers and Internet » Internet » Information
Featured Titles » New Arrivals » Nonfiction
Featured Titles » Science
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Reference » Science Reference » General
Reference » Science Reference » Sociology of Science
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Uncharted: Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Riverhead Books a Member of Penguin Group (US - English 9781594487453 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Aiden and Michel gained widespread media attention when they first demonstrated their innovative use of the Google Books project, which made available more than 30 million books in digitized form — about one in every four books published. This 'big data' is at the core of this fascinating glimpse into the pair's decade-long work and how 'n the coming decades, personal, digital, and historical records are going to totally transform the way we think about ourselves and the world around us.' Using a new scientific tool specially designed to be used with Google Books, the Ngram viewer, the pair were able to count words for 'track certain kinds of cultural change over time' and to make 'careful measurements that probe important aspects of our history, language, and culture.' The result is like using a new kind of telescope that allows one to see more closely — and accurately — the evolution of words and how this reflects cultural change. A long appendix of charts provides a range of fascinating Ngram-based insights as well — such as the fact that the word 'data' over the past hundred years has become more commonly used than the word 'God.' (Dec.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
Breaking open Big Data, two Harvard scientists reveal a ground-breaking way of looking at history and culture.

One of the greatest untapped resources of today isnt offshore oil or natural gas—its data. Gigabytes, exabytes (thats one quintillion bytes) of data are sitting on servers across the world. So how can we start to access this explosion of information, this “big data,” and what can it tell us?

 

Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel are two young scientists at Harvard who started to ask those questions. They teamed up with Google to create the Ngram Viewer, a Web-based tool that can chart words throughout the massive Google Books archive, sifting through billions of words to find fascinating cultural trends. On the day that the Ngram Viewer debuted in 2010, more than one million queries were run through it.

 

On the front lines of Big Data, Aiden and Michel realized that this big dataset—the Google Books archive that contains remarkable information on the human experience—had huge implications for looking at our shared human history. The tool they developed to delve into the data has enabled researchers to track how our language has evolved over time, how art has been censored, how fame can grow and fade, how nations trend toward war. How we remember and how we forget. And ultimately, how Big Data is changing the game for the sciences, humanities, politics, business, and our culture.

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