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Drawing Words and Writing Pictures: Making Comics from Manga to Graphic Novels

by and

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures: Making Comics from Manga to Graphic Novels Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comics creation — for college classes or for independent study — that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered — each complete with homework, extra credit activities, and supplementary reading suggestions — provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics.

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures was created by comics superstars Jessica Abel and Matt Madden and based on their classes at the School of Visual Arts. Series editors of the Best American Comics series and creators of a number of groundbreaking works, including 99 Ways to Tell a Story (Matt Madden) and La Perdida (Jessica Abel), Abel and Madden are always at the forefront of the comics industry.

Review:

"A gold mine of essential information for every aspiring comics artist. Highly recommended." Scott McCloud, author of Understanding Comics and Making Comics

Synopsis:

This coursebook on comic creation centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the 15 lessons offered provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own graphic novels.

Synopsis:

A gold mine of essential information for every aspiring comics artist. Highly recommended. --Scott McCloud

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comic creation - for college classes or for independent study - that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered - each complete with homework, extra credit activities and supplementary reading suggestions - provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics. Additional resources, lessons, and after-class help are available on the accompanying website, www.dw-wp.com. Drawing Words and Writing Pictures was created by Jessica Abel and Matt Madden and based on their classes at the School of Visual Arts. They are editors of the Best American Comics series and each has created a number of groundbreaking graphic novels, including Madden's 99 Ways to Tell a Story and Abel's La Perdida.

An Eisner Award Nominee

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comic creation--for the classroom or for independent study--that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered--each complete with homework, extra credit activities and supplementary reading suggestions--provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics.

Additional resources, lessons, and after-class help are available on the accompanying website, www.dw-wp.com.

Table of ContentsPREFACEThe tsunami of comics: coming to a town near youComics education: the time is nowEnter Drawing Words & Writing PicturesA note on the titleAcknowledgments INTRODUCTIONWho is this book for? Sidebar: Forming a Nomad groupOrganization of the bookSpecial featuresCompanion website for students and instructors 1. BUILDING BLOCKS--A working definition of comics, with an introduction to the most frequently used comics terms.

1.1 Know 'em when you see 'em

Defining comics Will Eisner

Scott McCloud

David Kunzle

What we talk about when we talk about comics

Sidebar: What's in a name?

1.2 Comics terminology

Frequently used termsSidebar: EmanataSidebar: Can't Draw? Read this

Activity: Drawing time

Homework: Drawing in action

Extra credit: Directed jam comic

2. EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY--A look at the single-panel comic and how it works.

2.1 Word and image

The juxtaposition of word and imageThe single-panel comicA closer look: Cartoons and beyondActivity: Gag reflexSidebar: Putting pen to paper

Homework: Gag meExtra credit: Sum of its parts

3. THE STRIP CLUB--A discussion of how multi-panel strips work to tell simple stories, plus an overview of thumbnails. 3.1 A comic a dayCreating a comic stripVariations in rhythm and pacingA closer look: Three strips in action Bud Fisher's Mud and Jeff Roy Crane's Wash Tubbs Tony Millionaire's MaakiesActivity: The wrong planet 3.2 ThumbnailsWriting picturesCreating thumbnails Homework: Strip it downExtra Credit: How to read Nancy 4. BRIDGING THE GAP--An introduction to what goes on between comics panels--in other words, panel transitions. 4.1 Reading between the linesTransitions and closureSeven types of panel transitionsActivity: Comic Jumble Homework: Closure ComicsExtra credit: Five-card Nancy 5. PENCILING--An investigation of the pitfalls and strategies of penciling comics, plus a brief look at the basics of drawing the human figure. 5.1 Penciling comicsLadies and gentlemen, sharpen your pencils Penciling pitfallsPenciling strategies Blue Pencil Colored pencil Map it Photocopying or scanning up thumbs Drawing outside the box Preparatory drawings TracingSidebar: Penciling toolboxSidebar: A master cartoonist's penciling methodActivity: Pencil one panel three different ways 5.2 Figuring out the figure 1: sticking to the basicsUsing figurettes Homework: PencilingExtra credit: Practice drawing figurettesExtra credit: Drawing figurettes by tracing photos 6. GETTING ON THE SAME PAGE--An examination of one-page comics and composition at the page level, plus a tutorial in laying out pages, tiers, and panels. 6.1 Elbow roomThe one-pagerA closer look: Two masters of the Sunday page Segar: The page as story Herriman: The page as designElements of page design The grind More approaches to page design Reading order Title design 6.2 Laying out pages, tiers, and panelsLaying out a page Live area Inside the live area Original art size Page ratio Gutters TiersActivity: Lay out your live area Homework: A month of Sundays thumbnailsExtra credit: Comic book book report: Sunday page 7. LETTERING--A focus on lettering, both as an art form and as a technical skill, plus a lesson on using the photocopier effectively. 7.1 Hand letteringDrawing words Lettering is not handwritingWhat's with the antique technology? A case for upper- and lower-case lettering Lettering styles Other lettering concernsWelcome to AmesActivity: Make lettering guidelines and practice letteringSidebar: Making word balloonsActivity: A comic with no pictures 7.2 The photocopierThe good, the bad, and the uglySidebar: Ruling a straight line: some tools that will help Homework: A month of Sundays penciling and letteringExtra credit: Lettering that speaks for itself 8. INKING THE DEAL--A look at inking with a nib pen, and making corrections to final artwork. 8.1 Inking with a nib penWhat is inking for?What's a nib pen?Why nib pens?Selecting a nib Two basic kinds of nibs Bowl-pointed nibs The thumbnail test Nib characteristics Buying nib setsHandling a nib penDrawing with a nib penTroubleshooting nibsSidebar: Inking toolsSidebar: A word on postureActivity: Ink your own drawings with a nib 8.2 Making correctionsBasic correctionsMajor corrections: Tracing and pasting Tracing PastingSidebar: Making your corrections stick Homework: A month of Sunday

Synopsis:

A gold mine of essential information for every aspiring comics artist. Highly recommended. --Scott McCloud

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comic creation - for college classes or for independent study - that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered - each complete with homework, extra credit activities and supplementary reading suggestions - provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics. Additional resources, lessons, and after-class help are available on the accompanying website, www.dw-wp.com. Drawing Words and Writing Pictures was created by Jessica Abel and Matt Madden and based on their classes at the School of Visual Arts. They are editors of the Best American Comics series and each has created a number of groundbreaking graphic novels, including Madden's 99 Ways to Tell a Story and Abel's La Perdida.

An Eisner Award Nominee

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comic creation--for the classroom or for independent study--that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered--each complete with homework, extra credit activities and supplementary reading suggestions--provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics.

Additional resources, lessons, and after-class help are available on the accompanying website, www.dw-wp.com.

Table of ContentsPREFACEThe tsunami of comics: coming to a town near youComics education: the time is nowEnter Drawing Words & Writing PicturesA note on the titleAcknowledgments INTRODUCTIONWho is this book for? Sidebar: Forming a Nomad groupOrganization of the bookSpecial featuresCompanion website for students and instructors 1. BUILDING BLOCKS--A working definition of comics, with an introduction to the most frequently used comics terms.

1.1 Know 'em when you see 'em

Defining comics Will Eisner

Scott McCloud

David Kunzle

What we talk about when we talk about comics

Sidebar: What's in a name?

1.2 Comics terminology

Frequently used termsSidebar: EmanataSidebar: Can't Draw? Read this

Activity: Drawing time

Homework: Drawing in action

Extra credit: Directed jam comic

2. EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY--A look at the single-panel comic and how it works.

2.1 Word and image

The juxtaposition of word and imageThe single-panel comicA closer look: Cartoons and beyondActivity: Gag reflexSidebar: Putting pen to paper

Homework: Gag meExtra credit: Sum of its parts

3. THE STRIP CLUB--A discussion of how multi-panel strips work to tell simple stories, plus an overview of thumbnails. 3.1 A comic a dayCreating a comic stripVariations in rhythm and pacingA closer look: Three strips in action Bud Fisher's Mud and Jeff Roy Crane's Wash Tubbs Tony Millionaire's MaakiesActivity: The wrong planet 3.2 ThumbnailsWriting picturesCreating thumbnails Homework: Strip it downExtra Credit: How to read Nancy 4. BRIDGING THE GAP--An introduction to what goes on between comics panels--in other words, panel transitions. 4.1 Reading between the linesTransitions and closureSeven types of panel transitionsActivity: Comic Jumble Homework: Closure ComicsExtra credit: Five-card Nancy 5. PENCILING--An investigation of the pitfalls and strategies of penciling comics, plus a brief look at the basics of drawing the human figure. 5.1 Penciling comicsLadies and gentlemen, sharpen your pencils Penciling pitfallsPenciling strategies Blue Pencil Colored pencil Map it Photocopying or scanning up thumbs Drawing outside the box Preparatory drawings TracingSidebar: Penciling toolboxSidebar: A master cartoonist's penciling methodActivity: Pencil one panel three different ways 5.2 Figuring out the figure 1: sticking to the basicsUsing figurettes Homework: PencilingExtra credit: Practice drawing figurettesExtra credit: Drawing figurettes by tracing photos 6. GETTING ON THE SAME PAGE--An examination of one-page comics and composition at the page level, plus a tutorial in laying out pages, tiers, and panels. 6.1 Elbow roomThe one-pagerA closer look: Two masters of the Sunday page Segar: The page as story Herriman: The page as designElements of page design The grind More approaches to page design Reading order Title design 6.2 Laying out pages, tiers, and panelsLaying out a page Live area Inside the live area Original art size Page ratio Gutters TiersActivity: Lay out your live area Homework: A month of Sundays thumbnailsExtra credit: Comic book book report: Sunday page 7. LETTERING--A focus on lettering, both as an art form and as a technical skill, plus a lesson on using the photocopier effectively. 7.1 Hand letteringDrawing words Lettering is not handwritingWhat's with the antique technology? A case for upper- and lower-case lettering Lettering styles Other lettering concernsWelcome to AmesActivity: Make lettering guidelines and practice letteringSidebar: Making word balloonsActivity: A comic with no pictures 7.2 The photocopierThe good, the bad, and the uglySidebar: Ruling a straight line: some tools that will help Homework: A month of Sundays penciling and letteringExtra credit: Lettering that speaks for itself 8. INKING THE DEAL--A look at inking with a nib pen, and making corrections to final artwork. 8.1 Inking with a nib penWhat is inking for?What's a nib pen?Why nib pens?Selecting a nib Two basic kinds of nibs Bowl-pointed nibs The thumbnail test Nib characteristics Buying nib setsHandling a nib penDrawing with a nib penTroubleshooting nibsSidebar: Inking toolsSidebar: A word on postureActivity: Ink your own drawings with a nib 8.2 Making correctionsBasic correctionsMajor corrections: Tracing and pasting Tracing PastingSidebar: Making your corrections stick Homework: A month of Sundays inkingSidebar: More nib examples in this bookExtra credit: Line for line 9. STRUCTURING STORY--An introduction to the narrative arc, the most fundamental type of story structure. 9.1 The narrative arcUncovering story structure: Jessica's taleThe narrative arc Why so traditional? Why conflict?Other narrative structures 9.2 The elements of a narrative arcThe five essential ingredients 1. The protagonist 2. The spark 3. The escalation 4. The climax 5. The denouementThe narrative arc: constructing a story worth the tellingThe five ingredients in action: CinderellaActivity: Analyze thisActivity: TV writer make believe Homework: Thumbnails for a six-page story with a narrative arcExtra credit: Thumbnail a three-page Chip and the Cookie Jar comic 10. GETTING INTO CHARACTER--A discussion of character types and motivations. 10.1 Developing your characterWhich comes first--the character or the story?What is a character?Character types Archetypal characters Naturalistic characters Intermediate charactersCharacter motivation ConflictSidebar: Using drawing to help develop characters The antagonistShow, don't tellActivity: Play your cards right Homework: Character pin-ups for your short storyHomework: Finish your short story thumbsExtra credit: Character mash-up 11. SETTING THE STAGE--A discussion of some of the many aspects of composition at the panel level, and a tutorial on title design. 11.1 Panel designBuilding a better panelPanel problem solving: Four basic considerations Framing Blocking Acting Mise-en-scene60 panels that just might work A few notes on the panelsSidebar: Film terminology and comicsPanel composition Asymmetry Tonal balance Diagonals Reading path Highlighting Internal framing Visual rhythm Negative space Silhouetting Depth of fieldActivity: Rethinking composition 11.2 TitlesThe importance of title designPlanning your title designLaying out and inking your title design Sketch Placement and composition Letter measurement and drawing guidelines Penciling Double-checking Inking straight letters Inking curved letters Touch-ups and correctionsSidebar: Type terminologyActivity: Plan, lay out, and ink a title design for your six-page comic Homework: Revise your six-page story thumbs and start pencilingExtra credit: Draw a folk tale 12. CONSTRUCTING A WORLD--A focus on creating a believable comics world, plus a brief look at drawing heads and hands. 12.1 Creating a sense of placeThe importance of backgroundsApproaches to world-building Drawing from lifeSidebar: Drawing specifics Using photo referenceSidebar: Things to keep in mind when drawing from photos Researching the real world Inventing realities Perspective Using your imaginationActivity: No time like the present 12.2 Figuring out the figure 2: heads and handsHeads and hands Facial measurements Variation Rotation Notes on drawing heads and facial expressions Drawing hands Heads and hands in actionActivity: The head's in your hands Homework: Continue penciling your six-page storyExtra credit: On-location comics 13. BLACK GOLD--A lesson in inking with the brush, including techniques for softening blacks. 13.1 The liquid lineIntroduction to inking with a brushBasic brush handling Charging your brush Holding your brush Checking your ink Checking your brush quality Practicing your techniqueDon't pencil with inkSidebar: Know your brushesSidebar: Buying, protecting, and cleaning a brush 13.2 Softening the blackTechniques for softening blacks Feathering Using dry brushInking a panel from start to finish Pencil Linework Finish inking Corrections Scanning 13.3 Notes on using a brushLines, spotting blacks, and other techniquesSidebar: More examples of brush inkingActivity: Ink a panel in brush Homework: Finish pencils of your six-page story and begin inkingExtra credit: Line for line II 14. COMICS IN THE AGE OF MECHANICAL REPRODUCTION--An introduction to reproducing comics using a scanner and sizing artwork using a proportion wheel. 14.1 Producing reproductionsScanning your a

About the Author

Winner of both the Harvey and Lulu Awards for Best New Talent in 1997, Jessica Abel is the author of Soundtrack and Mirror, Window, two comic collections culled from her comic book series, Artbabe. Her La Perdida (Pantheon, 2006) won the Harvey Award for Best New Series and was excerpted in 2006's Best American Comics. She resides in Brooklyn, NY.

Matt Madden is a comics creator and teacher at New York's School of Visual Arts. He is the creator of the graphic novels Black Candy, Odds Off, and A Fine Mess, and of the comics theory book 99 Ways to Tell a Story. He is the co-editor (with Jessica Abel) of the Best American Comics series. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781596431317
Author:
Jessica Abel and Matt Madden
Publisher:
First Second
Author:
Abel, Jessica
Author:
Madden, Matt
Subject:
Study & Teaching
Subject:
Comic books, strips, etc.
Subject:
Cartooning
Subject:
General
Subject:
Composition & Creative Writing - General
Subject:
Composition & Creative Writing
Subject:
Teaching Methods & Materials - Arts & Humanities
Subject:
Comic books, strips, etc. -- Technique.
Subject:
Cartooning -- Technique.
Subject:
Nonfiction
Subject:
Teaching methods
Subject:
Materials/Arts
Subject:
Humanities
Subject:
Composition
Subject:
Creative writing
Subject:
Art - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20080631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
- Up
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.1 x 11.96 x 0.7 in
Age Level:
14-UP

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Product details 304 pages First Second - English 9781596431317 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A gold mine of essential information for every aspiring comics artist. Highly recommended."
"Synopsis" by , This coursebook on comic creation centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the 15 lessons offered provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own graphic novels.
"Synopsis" by , A gold mine of essential information for every aspiring comics artist. Highly recommended. --Scott McCloud

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comic creation - for college classes or for independent study - that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered - each complete with homework, extra credit activities and supplementary reading suggestions - provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics. Additional resources, lessons, and after-class help are available on the accompanying website, www.dw-wp.com. Drawing Words and Writing Pictures was created by Jessica Abel and Matt Madden and based on their classes at the School of Visual Arts. They are editors of the Best American Comics series and each has created a number of groundbreaking graphic novels, including Madden's 99 Ways to Tell a Story and Abel's La Perdida.

An Eisner Award Nominee

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comic creation--for the classroom or for independent study--that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered--each complete with homework, extra credit activities and supplementary reading suggestions--provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics.

Additional resources, lessons, and after-class help are available on the accompanying website, www.dw-wp.com.

Table of ContentsPREFACEThe tsunami of comics: coming to a town near youComics education: the time is nowEnter Drawing Words & Writing PicturesA note on the titleAcknowledgments INTRODUCTIONWho is this book for? Sidebar: Forming a Nomad groupOrganization of the bookSpecial featuresCompanion website for students and instructors 1. BUILDING BLOCKS--A working definition of comics, with an introduction to the most frequently used comics terms.

1.1 Know 'em when you see 'em

Defining comics Will Eisner

Scott McCloud

David Kunzle

What we talk about when we talk about comics

Sidebar: What's in a name?

1.2 Comics terminology

Frequently used termsSidebar: EmanataSidebar: Can't Draw? Read this

Activity: Drawing time

Homework: Drawing in action

Extra credit: Directed jam comic

2. EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY--A look at the single-panel comic and how it works.

2.1 Word and image

The juxtaposition of word and imageThe single-panel comicA closer look: Cartoons and beyondActivity: Gag reflexSidebar: Putting pen to paper

Homework: Gag meExtra credit: Sum of its parts

3. THE STRIP CLUB--A discussion of how multi-panel strips work to tell simple stories, plus an overview of thumbnails. 3.1 A comic a dayCreating a comic stripVariations in rhythm and pacingA closer look: Three strips in action Bud Fisher's Mud and Jeff Roy Crane's Wash Tubbs Tony Millionaire's MaakiesActivity: The wrong planet 3.2 ThumbnailsWriting picturesCreating thumbnails Homework: Strip it downExtra Credit: How to read Nancy 4. BRIDGING THE GAP--An introduction to what goes on between comics panels--in other words, panel transitions. 4.1 Reading between the linesTransitions and closureSeven types of panel transitionsActivity: Comic Jumble Homework: Closure ComicsExtra credit: Five-card Nancy 5. PENCILING--An investigation of the pitfalls and strategies of penciling comics, plus a brief look at the basics of drawing the human figure. 5.1 Penciling comicsLadies and gentlemen, sharpen your pencils Penciling pitfallsPenciling strategies Blue Pencil Colored pencil Map it Photocopying or scanning up thumbs Drawing outside the box Preparatory drawings TracingSidebar: Penciling toolboxSidebar: A master cartoonist's penciling methodActivity: Pencil one panel three different ways 5.2 Figuring out the figure 1: sticking to the basicsUsing figurettes Homework: PencilingExtra credit: Practice drawing figurettesExtra credit: Drawing figurettes by tracing photos 6. GETTING ON THE SAME PAGE--An examination of one-page comics and composition at the page level, plus a tutorial in laying out pages, tiers, and panels. 6.1 Elbow roomThe one-pagerA closer look: Two masters of the Sunday page Segar: The page as story Herriman: The page as designElements of page design The grind More approaches to page design Reading order Title design 6.2 Laying out pages, tiers, and panelsLaying out a page Live area Inside the live area Original art size Page ratio Gutters TiersActivity: Lay out your live area Homework: A month of Sundays thumbnailsExtra credit: Comic book book report: Sunday page 7. LETTERING--A focus on lettering, both as an art form and as a technical skill, plus a lesson on using the photocopier effectively. 7.1 Hand letteringDrawing words Lettering is not handwritingWhat's with the antique technology? A case for upper- and lower-case lettering Lettering styles Other lettering concernsWelcome to AmesActivity: Make lettering guidelines and practice letteringSidebar: Making word balloonsActivity: A comic with no pictures 7.2 The photocopierThe good, the bad, and the uglySidebar: Ruling a straight line: some tools that will help Homework: A month of Sundays penciling and letteringExtra credit: Lettering that speaks for itself 8. INKING THE DEAL--A look at inking with a nib pen, and making corrections to final artwork. 8.1 Inking with a nib penWhat is inking for?What's a nib pen?Why nib pens?Selecting a nib Two basic kinds of nibs Bowl-pointed nibs The thumbnail test Nib characteristics Buying nib setsHandling a nib penDrawing with a nib penTroubleshooting nibsSidebar: Inking toolsSidebar: A word on postureActivity: Ink your own drawings with a nib 8.2 Making correctionsBasic correctionsMajor corrections: Tracing and pasting Tracing PastingSidebar: Making your corrections stick Homework: A month of Sunday

"Synopsis" by , A gold mine of essential information for every aspiring comics artist. Highly recommended. --Scott McCloud

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comic creation - for college classes or for independent study - that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered - each complete with homework, extra credit activities and supplementary reading suggestions - provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics. Additional resources, lessons, and after-class help are available on the accompanying website, www.dw-wp.com. Drawing Words and Writing Pictures was created by Jessica Abel and Matt Madden and based on their classes at the School of Visual Arts. They are editors of the Best American Comics series and each has created a number of groundbreaking graphic novels, including Madden's 99 Ways to Tell a Story and Abel's La Perdida.

An Eisner Award Nominee

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures is a course on comic creation--for the classroom or for independent study--that centers on storytelling and concludes with making a finished comic. With chapters on lettering, story structure, and panel layout, the fifteen lessons offered--each complete with homework, extra credit activities and supplementary reading suggestions--provide a solid introduction for people interested in making their own comics.

Additional resources, lessons, and after-class help are available on the accompanying website, www.dw-wp.com.

Table of ContentsPREFACEThe tsunami of comics: coming to a town near youComics education: the time is nowEnter Drawing Words & Writing PicturesA note on the titleAcknowledgments INTRODUCTIONWho is this book for? Sidebar: Forming a Nomad groupOrganization of the bookSpecial featuresCompanion website for students and instructors 1. BUILDING BLOCKS--A working definition of comics, with an introduction to the most frequently used comics terms.

1.1 Know 'em when you see 'em

Defining comics Will Eisner

Scott McCloud

David Kunzle

What we talk about when we talk about comics

Sidebar: What's in a name?

1.2 Comics terminology

Frequently used termsSidebar: EmanataSidebar: Can't Draw? Read this

Activity: Drawing time

Homework: Drawing in action

Extra credit: Directed jam comic

2. EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY--A look at the single-panel comic and how it works.

2.1 Word and image

The juxtaposition of word and imageThe single-panel comicA closer look: Cartoons and beyondActivity: Gag reflexSidebar: Putting pen to paper

Homework: Gag meExtra credit: Sum of its parts

3. THE STRIP CLUB--A discussion of how multi-panel strips work to tell simple stories, plus an overview of thumbnails. 3.1 A comic a dayCreating a comic stripVariations in rhythm and pacingA closer look: Three strips in action Bud Fisher's Mud and Jeff Roy Crane's Wash Tubbs Tony Millionaire's MaakiesActivity: The wrong planet 3.2 ThumbnailsWriting picturesCreating thumbnails Homework: Strip it downExtra Credit: How to read Nancy 4. BRIDGING THE GAP--An introduction to what goes on between comics panels--in other words, panel transitions. 4.1 Reading between the linesTransitions and closureSeven types of panel transitionsActivity: Comic Jumble Homework: Closure ComicsExtra credit: Five-card Nancy 5. PENCILING--An investigation of the pitfalls and strategies of penciling comics, plus a brief look at the basics of drawing the human figure. 5.1 Penciling comicsLadies and gentlemen, sharpen your pencils Penciling pitfallsPenciling strategies Blue Pencil Colored pencil Map it Photocopying or scanning up thumbs Drawing outside the box Preparatory drawings TracingSidebar: Penciling toolboxSidebar: A master cartoonist's penciling methodActivity: Pencil one panel three different ways 5.2 Figuring out the figure 1: sticking to the basicsUsing figurettes Homework: PencilingExtra credit: Practice drawing figurettesExtra credit: Drawing figurettes by tracing photos 6. GETTING ON THE SAME PAGE--An examination of one-page comics and composition at the page level, plus a tutorial in laying out pages, tiers, and panels. 6.1 Elbow roomThe one-pagerA closer look: Two masters of the Sunday page Segar: The page as story Herriman: The page as designElements of page design The grind More approaches to page design Reading order Title design 6.2 Laying out pages, tiers, and panelsLaying out a page Live area Inside the live area Original art size Page ratio Gutters TiersActivity: Lay out your live area Homework: A month of Sundays thumbnailsExtra credit: Comic book book report: Sunday page 7. LETTERING--A focus on lettering, both as an art form and as a technical skill, plus a lesson on using the photocopier effectively. 7.1 Hand letteringDrawing words Lettering is not handwritingWhat's with the antique technology? A case for upper- and lower-case lettering Lettering styles Other lettering concernsWelcome to AmesActivity: Make lettering guidelines and practice letteringSidebar: Making word balloonsActivity: A comic with no pictures 7.2 The photocopierThe good, the bad, and the uglySidebar: Ruling a straight line: some tools that will help Homework: A month of Sundays penciling and letteringExtra credit: Lettering that speaks for itself 8. INKING THE DEAL--A look at inking with a nib pen, and making corrections to final artwork. 8.1 Inking with a nib penWhat is inking for?What's a nib pen?Why nib pens?Selecting a nib Two basic kinds of nibs Bowl-pointed nibs The thumbnail test Nib characteristics Buying nib setsHandling a nib penDrawing with a nib penTroubleshooting nibsSidebar: Inking toolsSidebar: A word on postureActivity: Ink your own drawings with a nib 8.2 Making correctionsBasic correctionsMajor corrections: Tracing and pasting Tracing PastingSidebar: Making your corrections stick Homework: A month of Sundays inkingSidebar: More nib examples in this bookExtra credit: Line for line 9. STRUCTURING STORY--An introduction to the narrative arc, the most fundamental type of story structure. 9.1 The narrative arcUncovering story structure: Jessica's taleThe narrative arc Why so traditional? Why conflict?Other narrative structures 9.2 The elements of a narrative arcThe five essential ingredients 1. The protagonist 2. The spark 3. The escalation 4. The climax 5. The denouementThe narrative arc: constructing a story worth the tellingThe five ingredients in action: CinderellaActivity: Analyze thisActivity: TV writer make believe Homework: Thumbnails for a six-page story with a narrative arcExtra credit: Thumbnail a three-page Chip and the Cookie Jar comic 10. GETTING INTO CHARACTER--A discussion of character types and motivations. 10.1 Developing your characterWhich comes first--the character or the story?What is a character?Character types Archetypal characters Naturalistic characters Intermediate charactersCharacter motivation ConflictSidebar: Using drawing to help develop characters The antagonistShow, don't tellActivity: Play your cards right Homework: Character pin-ups for your short storyHomework: Finish your short story thumbsExtra credit: Character mash-up 11. SETTING THE STAGE--A discussion of some of the many aspects of composition at the panel level, and a tutorial on title design. 11.1 Panel designBuilding a better panelPanel problem solving: Four basic considerations Framing Blocking Acting Mise-en-scene60 panels that just might work A few notes on the panelsSidebar: Film terminology and comicsPanel composition Asymmetry Tonal balance Diagonals Reading path Highlighting Internal framing Visual rhythm Negative space Silhouetting Depth of fieldActivity: Rethinking composition 11.2 TitlesThe importance of title designPlanning your title designLaying out and inking your title design Sketch Placement and composition Letter measurement and drawing guidelines Penciling Double-checking Inking straight letters Inking curved letters Touch-ups and correctionsSidebar: Type terminologyActivity: Plan, lay out, and ink a title design for your six-page comic Homework: Revise your six-page story thumbs and start pencilingExtra credit: Draw a folk tale 12. CONSTRUCTING A WORLD--A focus on creating a believable comics world, plus a brief look at drawing heads and hands. 12.1 Creating a sense of placeThe importance of backgroundsApproaches to world-building Drawing from lifeSidebar: Drawing specifics Using photo referenceSidebar: Things to keep in mind when drawing from photos Researching the real world Inventing realities Perspective Using your imaginationActivity: No time like the present 12.2 Figuring out the figure 2: heads and handsHeads and hands Facial measurements Variation Rotation Notes on drawing heads and facial expressions Drawing hands Heads and hands in actionActivity: The head's in your hands Homework: Continue penciling your six-page storyExtra credit: On-location comics 13. BLACK GOLD--A lesson in inking with the brush, including techniques for softening blacks. 13.1 The liquid lineIntroduction to inking with a brushBasic brush handling Charging your brush Holding your brush Checking your ink Checking your brush quality Practicing your techniqueDon't pencil with inkSidebar: Know your brushesSidebar: Buying, protecting, and cleaning a brush 13.2 Softening the blackTechniques for softening blacks Feathering Using dry brushInking a panel from start to finish Pencil Linework Finish inking Corrections Scanning 13.3 Notes on using a brushLines, spotting blacks, and other techniquesSidebar: More examples of brush inkingActivity: Ink a panel in brush Homework: Finish pencils of your six-page story and begin inkingExtra credit: Line for line II 14. COMICS IN THE AGE OF MECHANICAL REPRODUCTION--An introduction to reproducing comics using a scanner and sizing artwork using a proportion wheel. 14.1 Producing reproductionsScanning your a

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