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1 Beaverton World History- France

Paris: The Secret History

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Paris: The Secret History Cover

ISBN13: 9781596913233
ISBN10: 1596913231
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

If Adam Gopnik's Paris to the Moon described daily life in contemporary Paris, this book describes daily life in Paris throughout its history: a history of the city from the point of view of the Parisians themselves. Paris captures everyone's imaginations: It's a backdrop for Proust's fictional pederast, Robert Doisneau's photographic kiss, and Edith Piaf's serenaded soldier-lovers; a home as much to romance and love poems as to prostitution and opium dens. The many pieces of the city coexist, each one as real as the next. What's more, the conflicted identity of the city is visible everywhere — between cobblestones, in bars, on the métro.

In this lively and lucid volume, Andrew Hussey brings to life the urchins and artists who've left their marks on the city, filling in the gaps of a history that affected the disenfranchised as much as the nobility. Paris: The Secret History ranges across centuries, movements, and cultural and political beliefs, from Napoleon's overcrowded cemeteries to Balzac's nocturnal flight from his debts. For Hussey, Paris is a city whose long and conflicted history continues to thrive and change. The book's is a picaresque journey through royal palaces, brothels, and sidewalk cafés, uncovering the rich, exotic, and often lurid history of the world's most beloved city.

Review:

"The 16th-century French wars of religion were less about Christian theology than about who ruled France; centuries later the French authorities, aided by, a significant number of ordinary citizens 'willingly and enthusiastically' sent tens of thousands of Parisian Jews to their deaths during WWII. In his sprawling, eclectic, self-indulgent and entertaining unofficial antihistory of Paris, Hussey (The Game of War: The Life and Death of Guy Debord), head of French and comparative literature at the University of London in Paris, tells the story of Paris from the perspective of the city's marginal and subversive elements insurrectionists, criminals, immigrants and sexual outsiders. Highlights include descriptions of the Pont-Neuf during the reigns of Henri IV and Louis XIII as a cultural epicenter, a hangout for con artists and prostitutes, and a cauldron of antigovernment, antiroyal and antireligious activity. Hussey also tells of the 'sacred geometry' of Notre-Dame as vivified by Victor Hugo. Also noteworthy in this overstuffed, unrestrained effort are Hussey's critique of former French president Mitterrand as 'a master of double-dealing and double-talk whose only real loyalty was to himself and his position in power,' and Hussey's take on the 2005 riots instigated by violent black and Arab suburban youths." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The 16th-century French wars of religion were less about Christian theology than about who ruled France; centuries later the French authorities, aided by , a significant number of ordinary citizens 'willingly and enthusiastically' sent tens of thousands of Parisian Jews to their deaths during WWII. In his sprawling, eclectic, self-indulgent and entertaining unofficial antihistory of Paris, Hussey (The Game of War: The Life and Death of Guy Debord), head of French and comparative literature at the University of London in Paris, tells the story of Paris from the perspective of the city's marginal and subversive elements — insurrectionists, criminals, immigrants and sexual outsiders. Highlights include descriptions of the Pont-Neuf during the reigns of Henri IV and Louis XIII as a cultural epicenter, a hangout for con artists and prostitutes, and a cauldron of antigovernment, antiroyal and antireligious activity. Hussey also tells of the 'sacred geometry' of Notre-Dame as vivified by Victor Hugo. Also noteworthy in this overstuffed, unrestrained effort are Hussey's critique of former French president Mitterrand as 'a master of double-dealing and double-talk whose only real loyalty was to himself and his position in power,' and Hussey's take on the 2005 riots instigated by violent black and Arab suburban youths. B&w illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"For anyone with notions of Paris as the most romantic city on Earth, try digesting this image of ordinary residents' lives during the Prussian attack of 1870: 'As the siege hardened, the most desperate among them took to digging up corpses in various cemeteries around the city, mincing the bones to make a thin sort of gruel which offered little nutritional value, but at least kept them warm.'

... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"For anyone with notions of Paris as the most romantic city on Earth, try digesting this image of ordinary residents' lives during the Prussian attack of 1870: 'As the siege hardened, the most desperate among them took to digging up corpses in various cemeteries around the city, mincing the bones to make a thin sort of gruel which offered little nutritional value, but at least kept them warm.'

... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"In the closing pages...Andrew Hussey notes, 'As violence and terror dominated the streets, sex and love somehow still remained central to the ethos and mythology of Paris.' As it happens, he is referring to the mid-1990's, but the description could apply to almost any period in the last 500 years. Paris, Mr. Hussey amply demonstrates, has always been a city of darkness as well as light." New York Times

Review:

"This is a timely book, for Hussey observes that Paris is still being shaped by new arrivals who are playing a role in remaking the city yet again." Library Journal

Review:

"An immensely readable, richly detailed and sometimes disturbing chronicle that explores much of the darkness in the City of Lights." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

If Adam Gopnik's Paris to the Moon described daily life in contemporary Paris, this book describes daily life in Paris throughout its history: a history of the city from the point of view of the Parisians themselves. Paris captures everyone's imaginations: It's a backdrop for Proust's fictional pederast, Robert Doisneau's photographic kiss, and Edith Piaf's serenaded soldier-lovers; a home as much to romance and love poems as to prostitution and opium dens. The many pieces of the city coexist, each one as real as the next. What's more, the conflicted identity of the city is visible everywhere--between cobblestones, in bars, on the métro.

 

In this lively and lucid volume, Andrew Hussey brings to life the urchins and artists who've left their marks on the city, filling in the gaps of a history that affected the disenfranchised as much as the nobility. Paris: The Secret History ranges across centuries, movements, and cultural and political beliefs, from Napoleon's overcrowded cemeteries to Balzac's nocturnal flight from his debts. For Hussey, Paris is a city whose long and conflicted history continues to thrive and change. The book's is a picaresque journey through royal palaces, brothels, and sidewalk cafés, uncovering the rich, exotic, and often lurid history of the world's most beloved city.

Synopsis:

If Adam Gopnik's "Paris to the Moon" described daily life in contemporary Paris, this book describes daily life in the city throughout its history. Two 8-page inserts.

About the Author

Andrew Hussey is a cultural historian and biographer. His previous book, a critically acclaimed biography of Guy Debord, was published in 2001. He is Lecturer in French studies at the University of Aberystwyth and divides his time between Ireland, Wales and Paris.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Freitasgirl, December 24, 2006 (view all comments by Freitasgirl)
If your interested in finding out about the history and daily lifestyle of Paris, then this book will satisfy your needs. With a detailed view of the many changes that have taken place, and the ideology of today is certainly well written.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 12 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781596913233
Subtitle:
The Secret History
Author:
Hussey, Andrew
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Subject:
Europe - France
Subject:
History
Subject:
Civilization
Subject:
France
Subject:
Paris (France) Intellectual life.
Subject:
Paris (France) Civilization.
Subject:
Europe - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20061128
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
bandw/color illustrations throughout, pl
Pages:
512
Dimensions:
9.26x6.54x1.60 in. 1.95 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Europe » France » Paris
History and Social Science » World History » France » General

Paris: The Secret History Used Hardcover
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$18.95 In Stock
Product details 512 pages Bloomsbury Publishing PLC - English 9781596913233 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The 16th-century French wars of religion were less about Christian theology than about who ruled France; centuries later the French authorities, aided by, a significant number of ordinary citizens 'willingly and enthusiastically' sent tens of thousands of Parisian Jews to their deaths during WWII. In his sprawling, eclectic, self-indulgent and entertaining unofficial antihistory of Paris, Hussey (The Game of War: The Life and Death of Guy Debord), head of French and comparative literature at the University of London in Paris, tells the story of Paris from the perspective of the city's marginal and subversive elements insurrectionists, criminals, immigrants and sexual outsiders. Highlights include descriptions of the Pont-Neuf during the reigns of Henri IV and Louis XIII as a cultural epicenter, a hangout for con artists and prostitutes, and a cauldron of antigovernment, antiroyal and antireligious activity. Hussey also tells of the 'sacred geometry' of Notre-Dame as vivified by Victor Hugo. Also noteworthy in this overstuffed, unrestrained effort are Hussey's critique of former French president Mitterrand as 'a master of double-dealing and double-talk whose only real loyalty was to himself and his position in power,' and Hussey's take on the 2005 riots instigated by violent black and Arab suburban youths." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The 16th-century French wars of religion were less about Christian theology than about who ruled France; centuries later the French authorities, aided by , a significant number of ordinary citizens 'willingly and enthusiastically' sent tens of thousands of Parisian Jews to their deaths during WWII. In his sprawling, eclectic, self-indulgent and entertaining unofficial antihistory of Paris, Hussey (The Game of War: The Life and Death of Guy Debord), head of French and comparative literature at the University of London in Paris, tells the story of Paris from the perspective of the city's marginal and subversive elements — insurrectionists, criminals, immigrants and sexual outsiders. Highlights include descriptions of the Pont-Neuf during the reigns of Henri IV and Louis XIII as a cultural epicenter, a hangout for con artists and prostitutes, and a cauldron of antigovernment, antiroyal and antireligious activity. Hussey also tells of the 'sacred geometry' of Notre-Dame as vivified by Victor Hugo. Also noteworthy in this overstuffed, unrestrained effort are Hussey's critique of former French president Mitterrand as 'a master of double-dealing and double-talk whose only real loyalty was to himself and his position in power,' and Hussey's take on the 2005 riots instigated by violent black and Arab suburban youths. B&w illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "In the closing pages...Andrew Hussey notes, 'As violence and terror dominated the streets, sex and love somehow still remained central to the ethos and mythology of Paris.' As it happens, he is referring to the mid-1990's, but the description could apply to almost any period in the last 500 years. Paris, Mr. Hussey amply demonstrates, has always been a city of darkness as well as light."
"Review" by , "This is a timely book, for Hussey observes that Paris is still being shaped by new arrivals who are playing a role in remaking the city yet again."
"Review" by , "An immensely readable, richly detailed and sometimes disturbing chronicle that explores much of the darkness in the City of Lights."
"Synopsis" by ,
If Adam Gopnik's Paris to the Moon described daily life in contemporary Paris, this book describes daily life in Paris throughout its history: a history of the city from the point of view of the Parisians themselves. Paris captures everyone's imaginations: It's a backdrop for Proust's fictional pederast, Robert Doisneau's photographic kiss, and Edith Piaf's serenaded soldier-lovers; a home as much to romance and love poems as to prostitution and opium dens. The many pieces of the city coexist, each one as real as the next. What's more, the conflicted identity of the city is visible everywhere--between cobblestones, in bars, on the métro.

 

In this lively and lucid volume, Andrew Hussey brings to life the urchins and artists who've left their marks on the city, filling in the gaps of a history that affected the disenfranchised as much as the nobility. Paris: The Secret History ranges across centuries, movements, and cultural and political beliefs, from Napoleon's overcrowded cemeteries to Balzac's nocturnal flight from his debts. For Hussey, Paris is a city whose long and conflicted history continues to thrive and change. The book's is a picaresque journey through royal palaces, brothels, and sidewalk cafés, uncovering the rich, exotic, and often lurid history of the world's most beloved city.

"Synopsis" by , If Adam Gopnik's "Paris to the Moon" described daily life in contemporary Paris, this book describes daily life in the city throughout its history. Two 8-page inserts.
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