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Bottlemania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It

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Bottlemania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It Cover

ISBN13: 9781596913714
ISBN10: 1596913711
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An incisive, intrepid, and habit-changing narrative investigation into the commercialization of our most basic human need: drinking water.

Having already surpassed milk and beer, and second now only to soda, bottled water is on the verge of becoming the most popular beverage in the country. The brands have become so ubiquitous that we're hardly conscious that Poland Spring and Evian were once real springs, bubbling in remote corners of Maine and France. Only now, with the water industry trading in the billions of dollars, have we begun to question what it is we're drinking and why.

In this intelligent, eye-opening work of narrative journalism, Elizabeth Royte does for water what Eric Schlosser did for fast food: she finds the people, machines, economies, and cultural trends that bring it from nature to our supermarkets. Along the way, she investigates the questions we must inevitably answer. Who owns our water? What happens when a bottled-water company stakes a claim on your town's source? Should we have to pay for water? Is the stuff coming from the tap completely safe? And if so, how many chemicals are dumped in to make it potable? What's the environmental footprint of making, transporting, and disposing of all those plastic bottles?

A riveting chronicle of one of the greatest marketing coups of the twentieth century as well as a powerful environmental wake-up call, Bottlemania is essential reading for anyone who shells out two dollars to quench their daily thirst.

Review:

"Royte (Garbage Land) plunges into America's mighty thirst for bottled water in an investigation of 'one of the greatest marketing coups of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.' As tap water has become cleaner and better-tasting, the bottled water industry has exploded into a $60 billion business; consumers guzzle more high-priced designer water than milk or beer and spend billions on brands such as Pepsi's Aquafina and Coke's Dasani that are essentially processed municipal water. It's an unparalleled — and almost exclusively American — 'social phenomenon.' With journalistic zeal, Royte chronicles the questionable practices of Nestle-owned Poland Springs and documents the environmental impact of discarded plastic bottles, the carbon footprint of water shipped long distances and health concerns around the leaching of plastic compounds from bottles. Not all tap water is perfectly pure, writes Royte, still, 92% of the nation's 53,000 local water systems meet or exceed federal safety standards and 'it is the devil we know,' at least as good and often better than bottled water. This portrait of the science, commerce and politics of potable water is an entertaining and eye-opening narrative. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"[A] compelling story of how beverage companies have successfully persuaded Americans to spend more than $10 billion annually on a product that's available everywhere practically free of charge." Very Short List

Review:

"Readers will be surprised at the many facets of the story of bottled water, and the blend of narrative with historical fact keeps the book compelling and dynamic." Library Journal

Review:

"Bottlemania is eye-opening and informative; you will never look at water — either 'designer' or tap — in quite the same way. Royte demonstrates how everything is, in the end, truly connected." Elizabeth Kolbert

Review:

"Though [Royte] personally chooses not to support the bottled-water industry, she shines just as bright a light on the problems with tap-water production....Lively investigative journalism." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"The facile answer is marketing, marketing and more marketing, but Elizabeth Royte goes much deeper into the drink, streaming trends cultural, economic, political and hydrological into an engaging investigation of an unexpectedly murky substance." Lisa Margonelli, NY Times Book Review

Review:

"Ingenious. Amiably, without haranguing or hyperventilating, this veteran environmental writer has produced what could be, assuming enough people read it, one of the year's most influential books." Boston Globe

Review:

"[A] timely, densely reported but also very readable and distressing examination of the way we drink." Abe Streep, San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"This tautly paced volume more closely resembles a travel narrative than a tree-hugging jeremiad." Mark Coleman, Los Angeles Times

Synopsis:

In this intelligent, eye-opening work of narrative journalism, Royte does for water what Eric Schlosser did for fast food: she finds the people, machines, economies, and cultural trends that bring it from nature to the supermarkets.

Synopsis:

“An engaging investigation of an unexpectedly murky substance…After you read it you will sip warily from your water bottle.”—New York Times Book Review

Bottled water is on the verge of becoming the most popular beverage in the country. But whats the cost of all this water—for us and for the environment? In this eye-opening book, Elizabeth Royte does for water what Michael Pollan did for food: She examines the people, machines, economies, and cultural trends that surround it on its journey from distant aquifers to our supermarkets and homes. She looks at the various sources of drinking water (including the embattled Maine town that Poland Spring exports from), the chemicals we dump into it to make it potable, and the real differences between tap and bottled. Bottlemania is the story of one of the greatest marketing coups of the twentieth century—and one of the most troubling issues facing our environment today. With a new afterword on the developing issues in clean water around the world.

Synopsis:

An incisive, intrepid, and habit-changing narrative investigation into the commercialization of our most basic human need: drinking water.

Having already surpassed milk and beer, and second now only to soda, bottled water is on the verge of becoming the most popular beverage in the country. The brands have become so ubiquitous that were hardly conscious that Poland Spring and Evian were once real springs, bubbling in remote corners of Maine and France. Only now, with the water industry trading in the billions of dollars, have we begun to question what it is were drinking and why.

In this intelligent, eye-opening work of narrative journalism, Elizabeth Royte does for water what Eric Schlosser did for fast food: she finds the people, machines, economies, and cultural trends that bring it from nature to our supermarkets. Along the way, she investigates the questions we must inevitably answer. Who owns our water? What happens when a bottled-water company stakes a claim on your towns source? Should we have to pay for water? Is the stuff coming from the tap completely safe? And if so, how many chemicals are dumped in to make it potable? Whats the environmental footprint of making, transporting, and disposing of all those plastic bottles?

A riveting chronicle of one of the greatest marketing coups of the twentieth century as well as a powerful environmental wake-up call, Bottlemania is essential reading for anyone who shells out two dollars to quench their daily thirst.

About the Author

Elizabeth Royte has written for the New York Times Magazine, Harper's, National Geographic, Outside, Smithsonian, and the New Yorker. She is the author of Garbage Land and The Tapir's Morning Bath.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

bsmith, July 23, 2008 (view all comments by bsmith)
Excellent and interesting that something so common has such an impact . This book is a good gift for many ages.
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(173 of 201 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781596913714
Author:
Royte, Elizabeth
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Subject:
General Social Science
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection - General
Subject:
Social aspects
Subject:
Bottled water.
Subject:
Industries - General
Subject:
Corporate & Business History - General
Subject:
Beverages - General
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection
Subject:
Bottled water industry - Social aspects
Subject:
Bottled water - Social aspects
Subject:
General
Subject:
Business-History and Biography
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
May 2008
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.1 x 6.12 x 1.02 in

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Related Subjects

» Business » History and Biographies
» Cooking and Food » Beverages » Bartending and Liquor
» History and Social Science » Geography » Water and Hydrology
» Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment

Bottlemania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Bloomsbury USA - English 9781596913714 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Royte (Garbage Land) plunges into America's mighty thirst for bottled water in an investigation of 'one of the greatest marketing coups of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.' As tap water has become cleaner and better-tasting, the bottled water industry has exploded into a $60 billion business; consumers guzzle more high-priced designer water than milk or beer and spend billions on brands such as Pepsi's Aquafina and Coke's Dasani that are essentially processed municipal water. It's an unparalleled — and almost exclusively American — 'social phenomenon.' With journalistic zeal, Royte chronicles the questionable practices of Nestle-owned Poland Springs and documents the environmental impact of discarded plastic bottles, the carbon footprint of water shipped long distances and health concerns around the leaching of plastic compounds from bottles. Not all tap water is perfectly pure, writes Royte, still, 92% of the nation's 53,000 local water systems meet or exceed federal safety standards and 'it is the devil we know,' at least as good and often better than bottled water. This portrait of the science, commerce and politics of potable water is an entertaining and eye-opening narrative. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[A] compelling story of how beverage companies have successfully persuaded Americans to spend more than $10 billion annually on a product that's available everywhere practically free of charge."
"Review" by , "Readers will be surprised at the many facets of the story of bottled water, and the blend of narrative with historical fact keeps the book compelling and dynamic."
"Review" by , "Bottlemania is eye-opening and informative; you will never look at water — either 'designer' or tap — in quite the same way. Royte demonstrates how everything is, in the end, truly connected."
"Review" by , "Though [Royte] personally chooses not to support the bottled-water industry, she shines just as bright a light on the problems with tap-water production....Lively investigative journalism."
"Review" by , "The facile answer is marketing, marketing and more marketing, but Elizabeth Royte goes much deeper into the drink, streaming trends cultural, economic, political and hydrological into an engaging investigation of an unexpectedly murky substance."
"Review" by , "Ingenious. Amiably, without haranguing or hyperventilating, this veteran environmental writer has produced what could be, assuming enough people read it, one of the year's most influential books."
"Review" by , "[A] timely, densely reported but also very readable and distressing examination of the way we drink."
"Review" by , "This tautly paced volume more closely resembles a travel narrative than a tree-hugging jeremiad."
"Synopsis" by , In this intelligent, eye-opening work of narrative journalism, Royte does for water what Eric Schlosser did for fast food: she finds the people, machines, economies, and cultural trends that bring it from nature to the supermarkets.
"Synopsis" by ,
“An engaging investigation of an unexpectedly murky substance…After you read it you will sip warily from your water bottle.”—New York Times Book Review

Bottled water is on the verge of becoming the most popular beverage in the country. But whats the cost of all this water—for us and for the environment? In this eye-opening book, Elizabeth Royte does for water what Michael Pollan did for food: She examines the people, machines, economies, and cultural trends that surround it on its journey from distant aquifers to our supermarkets and homes. She looks at the various sources of drinking water (including the embattled Maine town that Poland Spring exports from), the chemicals we dump into it to make it potable, and the real differences between tap and bottled. Bottlemania is the story of one of the greatest marketing coups of the twentieth century—and one of the most troubling issues facing our environment today. With a new afterword on the developing issues in clean water around the world.

"Synopsis" by ,
An incisive, intrepid, and habit-changing narrative investigation into the commercialization of our most basic human need: drinking water.

Having already surpassed milk and beer, and second now only to soda, bottled water is on the verge of becoming the most popular beverage in the country. The brands have become so ubiquitous that were hardly conscious that Poland Spring and Evian were once real springs, bubbling in remote corners of Maine and France. Only now, with the water industry trading in the billions of dollars, have we begun to question what it is were drinking and why.

In this intelligent, eye-opening work of narrative journalism, Elizabeth Royte does for water what Eric Schlosser did for fast food: she finds the people, machines, economies, and cultural trends that bring it from nature to our supermarkets. Along the way, she investigates the questions we must inevitably answer. Who owns our water? What happens when a bottled-water company stakes a claim on your towns source? Should we have to pay for water? Is the stuff coming from the tap completely safe? And if so, how many chemicals are dumped in to make it potable? Whats the environmental footprint of making, transporting, and disposing of all those plastic bottles?

A riveting chronicle of one of the greatest marketing coups of the twentieth century as well as a powerful environmental wake-up call, Bottlemania is essential reading for anyone who shells out two dollars to quench their daily thirst.

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