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Mrs. Woolf and the Servants: An Intimate History of Domestic Life in Bloomsbury

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Mrs. Woolf and the Servants: An Intimate History of Domestic Life in Bloomsbury Cover

 

Staff Pick

Virginia Woolf may have had a room of her own, but someone else cleaned it. Desperate to erase their Victorian past, the members of the Bloomsbury group were eager to set informal standards with their staff — to varying degrees of success. Nevertheless, their homes were divided between "us" and "them." (Someone, after all, had to coddle them while they created.) Alison Light's Mrs. Woolf and the Servants offers a unique look into the below-stairs world of Bloomsbury and the not-always-silent role played by the domestic servant.
Recommended by Christopher, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

In Mrs. Woolf and the Servants, a mix of social history, biography and literary criticism, Alison Light takes a sustained look at these servants and their relationships with their artistic, semibohemian, upper-middle-class employers. Though Light spends equal time upstairs and downstairs, the dominant figure of the book is Woolf....Light digs deeper into Woolf's experience with servants and pieces together the servants' stories — a method that allows her to examine, from fresh angles, the institution of domestic servitude, which intimately bound together women of different classes who thought they had little in common and often found each other baffling. Elaine Blair, The Nation (read the entire Nation review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A revealing and personal new perspective on the Bloomsbury set and the servants who shared their lives.

When Virginia Woolf wrote A Room of Ones Own in 1929, she established her reputation as a feminist, a woman who could imagine a more open and liberal reality, and an advocate for the female voice. Indeed the Bloomsbury set has often been identified with liberal, open-minded views; Woolfs circle of artists and writers were considered Bohemians ahead of their time. But they were also of their time. Like thousands of other British households, Virginia Woolfs relied on live-in domestics for the most intimate of daily tasks. That room of her own she so valued was cleaned, heated, and supplied with meals by a series of cooks and maids throughout her childhood and adult life. In Mrs. Woolf and the Servants, Alison Light gives depth and dignity to the long-overlooked servants who worked for the Bloomsbury intellectuals.  

The result is twofold. For one, Light adds revealing nuances to our picture of Virginia Woolf, both as a woman and as writer. She also captures a fascinating period of British history, primarily between the wars, when modern oil stoves were creeping into kitchens to replace coal, and young women were starting to dream of working in hat shops rather than mansions. 

Despite the liberal outlook of the Bloomsbury set, and their conscious efforts to leave their Victorian past behind, their homes were nevertheless divided into the worlds of "us" and "them." Alison Light writes with insight and charm about this fraught side of Bloomsbury, and hers is a refreshingly balanced portrait of Virginia Woolf, flaws and all. 

Review:

"Virginia Woolf is a feminist icon, and her husband, Leonard, was a committed socialist and supporter of workers' rights. Yet, says Light, in this fresh take on Bloomsbury, the couple perpetuated the class system by paying a pittance to their charwoman. In her attempt to restore the servants to the Bloomsbury story, Light also ruminates about whether the dependence of Woolf and her sister, Vanessa Bell, on their assorted live-in maids and cooks plays havoc with the idealized image of them as 'bohemian, free women creating a new kind of life.' Light also dissects Woolf's fictional servants as a window into contemporary social class prejudices and delves into the personal histories of Woolf's servants in context with their peers. British scholar Light (Forever England), the granddaughter of a live-in domestic, often seems to be pushing a personal agenda, and her insistence that without the hard work of the servants there would have been no Bloomsbury is unconvincing, yet her analyses of both the Bloomsbury notables and the servant class of their time are deft and engrossing. Illus. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

About the Author

Alison Light is the author of Forever England: Femininity, Literature and Conservatism between the Wars and edited Virginia Woolf's Flush for Penguin Classics. She is currently a Professor at the Raphael Samuel History Centre at the University of East London, and teaches English at Newcastle University. She is a contributor to the London Review of Books. Her grandmother worked as a domestic servant.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781596915602
Author:
Light, Alison
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Authors, English
Subject:
Women domestics
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain - General
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Authors, English -- 20th century.
Subject:
Bloomsbury (London, England)
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20080931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
BandW Illustrations throughout
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Mrs. Woolf and the Servants: An Intimate History of Domestic Life in Bloomsbury Used Hardcover
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Product details 400 pages Bloomsbury Press - English 9781596915602 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Virginia Woolf may have had a room of her own, but someone else cleaned it. Desperate to erase their Victorian past, the members of the Bloomsbury group were eager to set informal standards with their staff — to varying degrees of success. Nevertheless, their homes were divided between "us" and "them." (Someone, after all, had to coddle them while they created.) Alison Light's Mrs. Woolf and the Servants offers a unique look into the below-stairs world of Bloomsbury and the not-always-silent role played by the domestic servant.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Virginia Woolf is a feminist icon, and her husband, Leonard, was a committed socialist and supporter of workers' rights. Yet, says Light, in this fresh take on Bloomsbury, the couple perpetuated the class system by paying a pittance to their charwoman. In her attempt to restore the servants to the Bloomsbury story, Light also ruminates about whether the dependence of Woolf and her sister, Vanessa Bell, on their assorted live-in maids and cooks plays havoc with the idealized image of them as 'bohemian, free women creating a new kind of life.' Light also dissects Woolf's fictional servants as a window into contemporary social class prejudices and delves into the personal histories of Woolf's servants in context with their peers. British scholar Light (Forever England), the granddaughter of a live-in domestic, often seems to be pushing a personal agenda, and her insistence that without the hard work of the servants there would have been no Bloomsbury is unconvincing, yet her analyses of both the Bloomsbury notables and the servant class of their time are deft and engrossing. Illus. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , In Mrs. Woolf and the Servants, a mix of social history, biography and literary criticism, Alison Light takes a sustained look at these servants and their relationships with their artistic, semibohemian, upper-middle-class employers. Though Light spends equal time upstairs and downstairs, the dominant figure of the book is Woolf....Light digs deeper into Woolf's experience with servants and pieces together the servants' stories — a method that allows her to examine, from fresh angles, the institution of domestic servitude, which intimately bound together women of different classes who thought they had little in common and often found each other baffling. (read the entire Nation review)
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