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Rose of No Man's Land

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Rose of No Man's Land Cover

ISBN13: 9781596921603
ISBN10: 1596921609
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When theres nowhere to go but up, why bother going anyplace at all?

Fourteen-year-old Trisha Driscoll is a hungry machine, taking in her hometown of Mogsfield, Massachusetts – a place that has shamelessly surrendered to neon signs, theme restaurants, and cookie-cutter chain stores. Cynical but naive, Trisha observes the disappointing world from the ignored perspective of a teenager: creepy guys, the unfathomable sadness of the elderly, illegal tattoos, and the wild kingdom of mall culture.

After being hired and abruptly fired from the most popular shop at the absurd and kaleidoscopic Square One Mall, Trisha finds herself linked up with a chain-smoking, physically stunted mall rat named Rose, and her life shifts into manic overdrive.

A whirlwind exploration of poverty and dropouts, Rose of No Mans Land is the world according to Trisha–a furious love story between two weirdo girls, brimming with snarky observations and soulful wonderings on the dazzle-flash emptiness of contemporary culture.

Review:

"Tea follows up her Lambda Award — winning San Francisco prostitution memoir, Valencia (2000), her sporadically transcendent collected poems, The Beautiful (2003), and last year's graphic novel, Rent Girl (now in development for TV), with this inspired queer bildungsroman. In Trisha Driscoll, Tea has developed an unreliable narrator who stands on her own. Trisha is a doughy, alcoholic 10th-grade denizen of Mogsfield, Mass., a fictional white trash nowhere. Her father is long gone; her mother, owing to psychosomatic back problems, does not leave the couch; her mother's boyfriend, Donnie, enters the kitchen only to make ramen; her younger sister, Kristy, is obsessed with launching herself onto reality TV and constantly films the family dysfunctioning around her. The first half of the novel establishes Trisha's grim bedroom-to-mall despair. In the second, a new friend, Rose, a fry cook who looks 12 — appears, and the two go on a crystal meth — fueled adventure with blissful highs and crashing lows. Tea is brilliant in making the stakes for Trisha abundantly clear as she discovers sex (and, concurrently, her sexuality), drugs and the emotional gains and losses attendant to each. Add in minor characters like the never-seen but oft-discussed Kim Porciatti and various dumb guys in cars, and you have a postmillennial, class-adjusted My So-Called Life." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The heroine of 'Rose of No Man's Land,' Michelle Tea's riotous paean to teenage-girl lonerdom, is Trisha Driscoll, a world-weary 14-year-old who sits in her room guzzling beer. She lives in a blue-collar suburb of Boston with her hypochondriac slacker mom, her mom's 'mulleted loser' boyfriend and her hairdresser sister Kristy, whose big plan for the summer is to put together an audition tape for 'The... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

A whirlwind exploration of poverty and dropouts, "Rose of No Man's Land" is the world according to Trisha--a furious love story between two weirdo girls, brimming with snarky observations and soulful wonderings on the dazzle-flash emptiness of contemporary culture.

About the Author

Michelle Tea lives in San Francisco, where she is beloved for her writing, her spoken word, and her innovative arts organization that brought the world Sister Spit. Her published books include Rent Girl, The Chelsea Whistle, and Valencia. She loves – like, really loves–beauty products.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

crowyhead, August 18, 2006 (view all comments by crowyhead)
Trisha's life is not exactly thrilling. Her mother is a hypochrondriac on disability, and her father is a junkie and is rumored to be in Louisiana somewhere. The best thing that can be said for Donnie, her mother's boyfriend, is that he doesn't try to molest Trisha or her older sister, Kristy. Kristy's the only one who has any ambition -- and her main ambition is to get on MTV's "The Real World" by documenting how screwed up her family is. Trisha feels like she's ready for something -- anything! -- to happen, and when she meets Rose she gets her wish...

This is sort of a rough book to review without giving too much away. The first half had me laughing out loud and shaking my head at Trisha's attitude and the way that she describes the things around her; her narrative voice is fantastic. It's very similar to Tea's style in her other books, but Trisha does feel like her own character rather than a stand-in for Michelle Tea. The second half of this had me holding my breath hoping that nothing too terribly horrible was going to happen. I did really, really like it, though.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781596921603
Author:
Tea, Michelle
Publisher:
MacAdam/Cage Publishing
Subject:
General
Subject:
Gay
Subject:
Teenage girls
Subject:
Lesbian youth
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20060431
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
A-&#8220; <br>&#8211; <i>Entertainment Weekly</i>
Language:
English
Pages:
306
Dimensions:
8.20x5.34x1.19 in. .99 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Rose of No Man's Land Used Hardcover
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Product details 306 pages MacAdam/Cage Publishing - English 9781596921603 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Tea follows up her Lambda Award — winning San Francisco prostitution memoir, Valencia (2000), her sporadically transcendent collected poems, The Beautiful (2003), and last year's graphic novel, Rent Girl (now in development for TV), with this inspired queer bildungsroman. In Trisha Driscoll, Tea has developed an unreliable narrator who stands on her own. Trisha is a doughy, alcoholic 10th-grade denizen of Mogsfield, Mass., a fictional white trash nowhere. Her father is long gone; her mother, owing to psychosomatic back problems, does not leave the couch; her mother's boyfriend, Donnie, enters the kitchen only to make ramen; her younger sister, Kristy, is obsessed with launching herself onto reality TV and constantly films the family dysfunctioning around her. The first half of the novel establishes Trisha's grim bedroom-to-mall despair. In the second, a new friend, Rose, a fry cook who looks 12 — appears, and the two go on a crystal meth — fueled adventure with blissful highs and crashing lows. Tea is brilliant in making the stakes for Trisha abundantly clear as she discovers sex (and, concurrently, her sexuality), drugs and the emotional gains and losses attendant to each. Add in minor characters like the never-seen but oft-discussed Kim Porciatti and various dumb guys in cars, and you have a postmillennial, class-adjusted My So-Called Life." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , A whirlwind exploration of poverty and dropouts, "Rose of No Man's Land" is the world according to Trisha--a furious love story between two weirdo girls, brimming with snarky observations and soulful wonderings on the dazzle-flash emptiness of contemporary culture.
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