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Change.Edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy

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Change.Edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy Cover

ISBN13: 9781607144410
ISBN10: 1607144417
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Proprietary higher ed industry leader, Andy Rosen discusses how ""edupreneurs"" are uniquely positioned to educate the nontraditional students shut out of the traditional college experience and are, in the process, preparing America's future workforce, tightening the talent gap, and ensuring our competitive edge in the global marketplace

It’s no wonder American higher education is facing a crisis.

While low-income students can’t find a spot in their local community colleges for lack of funding, public four-year universities are spending staggering sums on luxurious residence halls, ever-bigger football stadiums, and obscure research institutes. We have cosseted our most advantaged students even as we deny access to the working adults who urgently need higher education to advance their careers and our economy. In Change.edu: Rebooting for the new talent economy Andrew S. Rosen clearly and entertainingly details how far the American higher education system has strayed from the goals of access, quality, affordability, and accountability that should characterize our system, and offers a prescription to restore American educational pre-eminence.

To change, our system will have to end its reflexive opposition to anything new and different. Rosen describes how each new wave of innovation and expansion of educational access— starting with the founding of Harvard in 1636, and continuing with the advent of land-grant colleges in the 19th century, community colleges in the 20th century and private sector colleges over the last two decades—has been met with misunderstanding and ridicule. When colleges like the University of California, Cornell and Purdue were founded, they were scorned as “pretenders to the title of university” – language that tracks later criticisms of community colleges and most recently for-profit colleges.

Avoiding that condescension is just one of the reasons colleges have come under the sway of “Harvard Envy” – schools that were founded to expand access feel an inexorable tug to become more prestigious and exclusive. Even worse, the competition for the best students has led universities to turn themselves into full-fledged resorts; they’ve built climbing walls, French bistros and 20-person hot-tubs to entice students to their campuses.

How can America address an incentive system in higher education that is mismatched to the challenges of the years ahead? In Change.edu, Rosen outlines “seven certainties” of education in the coming 25 years, and presents an imperative for how our system must prepare for the coming changes. He proposes a new “playbook” for dealing with the change ahead, one that will enable American higher education to regain its global primacy and be a catalyst for economic growth in the 21st century.

Book News Annotation:

Rosen (the chairman and CEO of Kaplan, Inc., the for-profit education services company owned as a subsidiary by the Washington Post) promotes the role of for-profit educational institutions in American education, arguing that American education has benefited in the past from innovations such as land-grant colleges and community colleges that have also been greeted with the same kind of derision and charges of illegitimacy that have more recently been leveled at for-profit colleges, that "Harvard envy" has led to a situation in which university constituents measure education primarily by the prestige and attractiveness of the institution, that this "Harvard envy" has led to frequently wasteful and inefficient use of resources, and that for-profit colleges have demonstrated a sound approach to pedagogy that is more efficient and effective than many traditional schools. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

It’s no wonder American higher education is facing a crisis.

While low-income students can’t find a spot in their local community colleges for lack of funding, public four-year universities are spending staggering sums on luxurious residence halls, ever-bigger football stadiums, and obscure research institutes. We have cosseted our most advantaged students even as we deny access to the working adults who urgently need higher education to advance their careers and our economy. In Change.edu: Rebooting for the new talent economy Andrew S. Rosen clearly and entertainingly details how far the American higher education system has strayed from the goals of access, quality, affordability, and accountability that should characterize our system, and offers a prescription to restore American educational pre-eminence.

To change, our system will have to end its reflexive opposition to anything new and different. Rosen describes how each new wave of innovation and expansion of educational access— starting with the founding of Harvard in 1636, and continuing with the advent of land-grant colleges in the 19th century, community colleges in the 20th century and private sector colleges over the last two decades—has been met with misunderstanding and ridicule. When colleges like the University of California, Cornell and Purdue were founded, they were scorned as “pretenders to the title of university” – language that tracks later criticisms of community colleges and most recently for-profit colleges.

Avoiding that condescension is just one of the reasons colleges have come under the sway of “Harvard Envy” – schools that were founded to expand access feel an inexorable tug to become more prestigious and exclusive. Even worse, the competition for the best students has led universities to turn themselves into full-fledged resorts; they’ve built climbing walls, French bistros and 20-person hot-tubs to entice students to their campuses.

How can America address an incentive system in higher education that is mismatched to the challenges of the years ahead? In Change.edu, Rosen outlines “seven certainties” of education in the coming 25 years, and presents an imperative for how our system must prepare for the coming changes. He proposes a new “playbook” for dealing with the change ahead, one that will enable American higher education to regain its global primacy and be a catalyst for economic growth in the 21st century.

Synopsis:

It’s no wonder American higher education is facing a crisis.

While low-income students can’t find a spot in their local community colleges for lack of funding, public four-year universities are spending staggering sums on luxurious residence halls, ever-bigger football stadiums, and obscure research institutes. We have cosseted our most advantaged students even as we deny access to the working adults who urgently need higher education to advance their careers and our economy. In Change.edu: Rebooting for the new talent economy Andrew S. Rosen clearly and entertainingly details how far the American higher education system has strayed from the goals of access, quality, affordability, and accountability that should characterize our system, and offers a prescription to restore American educational pre-eminence.

To change, our system will have to end its reflexive opposition to anything new and different. Rosen describes how each new wave of innovation and expansion of educational access— starting with the founding of Harvard in 1636, and continuing with the advent of land-grant colleges in the 19th century, community colleges in the 20th century and private sector colleges over the last two decades—has been met with misunderstanding and ridicule. When colleges like the University of California, Cornell and Purdue were founded, they were scorned as “pretenders to the title of university” – language that tracks later criticisms of community colleges and most recently for-profit colleges.

Avoiding that condescension is just one of the reasons colleges have come under the sway of “Harvard Envy” – schools that were founded to expand access feel an inexorable tug to become more prestigious and exclusive. Even worse, the competition for the best students has led universities to turn themselves into full-fledged resorts; they’ve built climbing walls, French bistros and 20-person hot-tubs to entice students to their campuses.

How can America address an incentive system in higher education that is mismatched to the challenges of the years ahead? In Change.edu, Rosen outlines “seven certainties” of education in the coming 25 years, and presents an imperative for how our system must prepare for the coming changes. He proposes a new “playbook” for dealing with the change ahead, one that will enable American higher education to regain its global primacy and be a catalyst for economic growth in the 21st century.

About the Author

Andrew S. Rosen, CEO, Kaplan, Inc. is a leader in the rapidly changing education field, having pioneered the development of new learning technologies and formats that have expanded educational access to young people, working professionals, and non-traditional students across the globe. Previously, as CEO of the company’s largest business, Kaplan Higher Education, Rosen redefined the higher education landscape by bringing online and campus-based learning opportunities to working adults—more than 100,000 students across the country. As President of Kaplan University, Rosen led the school’s growth to more than 100 online programs and multiple campuses, and oversaw Concord Law School, the nation’s first online law school, and Kaplan Virtual Education, a leader in virtual high school instruction and curriculum development. Rosen holds an B.A. degree from Duke University and a J.D. from Yale Law School. Rosen currently serves on the boards of Enterprise Florida, the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale, the Broward Workshop, and the Council for Educational Change.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Joyce Allen, January 19, 2012 (view all comments by Joyce Allen)
Andrew Rosen is an industry insider, and as such knows the higher education landscape well. He builds a case for the cause and issues related to what he terms Harvard Envy. The message is sobering. We are supporting an education race that puts effort and money into attracting the same pool of privileged prospective students with lush campus trappings instead of with greater academic quality or more access to those with more limited financial means. Where Rosen falls short is in proposing a way through and out of this misdirected race.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781607144410
Author:
Rosen, Andrew
Publisher:
Kaplan Publishing
Author:
Rosen, Andrew S.
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Education-School Reform & Controversy
Subject:
Education-Higher Education
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20111031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8 x 5.25 in

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
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Change.Edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy Used Hardcover
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$11.50 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Kaplan Publishing - English 9781607144410 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , It’s no wonder American higher education is facing a crisis.

While low-income students can’t find a spot in their local community colleges for lack of funding, public four-year universities are spending staggering sums on luxurious residence halls, ever-bigger football stadiums, and obscure research institutes. We have cosseted our most advantaged students even as we deny access to the working adults who urgently need higher education to advance their careers and our economy. In Change.edu: Rebooting for the new talent economy Andrew S. Rosen clearly and entertainingly details how far the American higher education system has strayed from the goals of access, quality, affordability, and accountability that should characterize our system, and offers a prescription to restore American educational pre-eminence.

To change, our system will have to end its reflexive opposition to anything new and different. Rosen describes how each new wave of innovation and expansion of educational access— starting with the founding of Harvard in 1636, and continuing with the advent of land-grant colleges in the 19th century, community colleges in the 20th century and private sector colleges over the last two decades—has been met with misunderstanding and ridicule. When colleges like the University of California, Cornell and Purdue were founded, they were scorned as “pretenders to the title of university” – language that tracks later criticisms of community colleges and most recently for-profit colleges.

Avoiding that condescension is just one of the reasons colleges have come under the sway of “Harvard Envy” – schools that were founded to expand access feel an inexorable tug to become more prestigious and exclusive. Even worse, the competition for the best students has led universities to turn themselves into full-fledged resorts; they’ve built climbing walls, French bistros and 20-person hot-tubs to entice students to their campuses.

How can America address an incentive system in higher education that is mismatched to the challenges of the years ahead? In Change.edu, Rosen outlines “seven certainties” of education in the coming 25 years, and presents an imperative for how our system must prepare for the coming changes. He proposes a new “playbook” for dealing with the change ahead, one that will enable American higher education to regain its global primacy and be a catalyst for economic growth in the 21st century.

"Synopsis" by , It’s no wonder American higher education is facing a crisis.

While low-income students can’t find a spot in their local community colleges for lack of funding, public four-year universities are spending staggering sums on luxurious residence halls, ever-bigger football stadiums, and obscure research institutes. We have cosseted our most advantaged students even as we deny access to the working adults who urgently need higher education to advance their careers and our economy. In Change.edu: Rebooting for the new talent economy Andrew S. Rosen clearly and entertainingly details how far the American higher education system has strayed from the goals of access, quality, affordability, and accountability that should characterize our system, and offers a prescription to restore American educational pre-eminence.

To change, our system will have to end its reflexive opposition to anything new and different. Rosen describes how each new wave of innovation and expansion of educational access— starting with the founding of Harvard in 1636, and continuing with the advent of land-grant colleges in the 19th century, community colleges in the 20th century and private sector colleges over the last two decades—has been met with misunderstanding and ridicule. When colleges like the University of California, Cornell and Purdue were founded, they were scorned as “pretenders to the title of university” – language that tracks later criticisms of community colleges and most recently for-profit colleges.

Avoiding that condescension is just one of the reasons colleges have come under the sway of “Harvard Envy” – schools that were founded to expand access feel an inexorable tug to become more prestigious and exclusive. Even worse, the competition for the best students has led universities to turn themselves into full-fledged resorts; they’ve built climbing walls, French bistros and 20-person hot-tubs to entice students to their campuses.

How can America address an incentive system in higher education that is mismatched to the challenges of the years ahead? In Change.edu, Rosen outlines “seven certainties” of education in the coming 25 years, and presents an imperative for how our system must prepare for the coming changes. He proposes a new “playbook” for dealing with the change ahead, one that will enable American higher education to regain its global primacy and be a catalyst for economic growth in the 21st century.

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