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Indigo: In Search of the Color That Seduced the World

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Indigo: In Search of the Color That Seduced the World Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For almost five millennia, in every culture and in every major religion, indigo-a blue pigment obtained from the small green leaf of a parasitic shrub through a complex process that even scientists still regard as mysterious-has been at the center of turbulent human encounters.

Indigo is the story of this precious dye and its ancient heritage: its relationship to slavery as the "hidden half" of the transatlantic slave trade, its profound influence on fashion, and its spiritual significance, which is little recognized but no less alive today. It is an untold story, brimming with rich, electrifying tales of those who shaped the course of colonial history and a world economy.

But Indigo is also the story of a personal quest: Catherine McKinley is the descendant of a clan of Scots who wore indigo tartan as their virile armor; the kin of several generations of Jewish "rag traders"; the maternal granddaughter of a Massachusetts textile factory owner; and the paternal granddaughter of African slaves-her ancestors were traded along the same Saharan routes as indigo, where a length of blue cotton could purchase human life. McKinley's journey in search of beauty and her own history ultimately leads her to a new and satisfying path, to finally "taste life." With its four-color photo insert and sumptuous design, Indigo will be as irresistible to look at as it is to read.

Review:

"In this memoir of longing, community, and personal maturation, McKinley (The Book of Sarahs), half African-American by birth, adopted and raised by white parents who were plant devotees, seeks her roots through the intertwined European and African history of the once rare indigo. A plant dye long prized for its deep blue color, indigo became a staple of trade from Africa across the Mediterranean and Europe; indigo and the fabric dyed from it evoke stories of slavery (past and present), global trade, and entrenched cultural traditions. McKinley's journey to the source of indigo leads her unexpectedly to politically unstable areas like the Ivory Coast, as well as to Ghana, Mali, and other African countries, where she is welcomed. McKinley's passion for the rare blue dye — created from ash, urine, and leaves, and used to painstakingly imprint storytelling designs — leads to intense friendships and an introduction to the complexity of social and economic status in a continent so far removed from the woman who inspired McKinley's journey — her grandmother — a questioning, tartan-clad woman in a rich blue coat. Photo insert; map. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Book News Annotation:

Symbolically associated with royalty, divinity and spirituality, indigo, a deep blue pigment which comes from the small green leaf of a parasitic shrub, has fascinating and until now untold stories steeped in history. Known as "The Devil's Dye" from its involvement in the bitter trade wars, as well as being a cornerstone in the slave trade, author McKinley's obsession and attraction to the color led her on a personal journey through nine countries of Africa to discover the power and effect indigo has had in shaping the course of history and world economics. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Brimming with rich, electrifying tales of the precious dye and its ancient heritage, Indigo is also the story of a personal quest: Catherine McKinley is the descendant of a clan of Scots who wore indigo tartan; Jewish "rag traders"; a Massachusetts textile factory owner; and African slaves—her ancestors were traded along the same Saharan routes as indigo, where a length of blue cotton could purchase human life. McKinleys journey in search of beauty and her own history leads her to the West African women who dye, trade, and wear indigo—women who unwittingly teach her that buried deep in the folds of their cloths is all of destiny and the human story.

About the Author

Catherine E. McKinley is the author of The Book of Sarahs. She is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College, where she has taught creative nonfiction, and a former Fulbright Scholar in Ghana, West Africa. She lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781608195053
Author:
Mckinley, Catherine E.
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Author:
McKinley, Catherine E.
Subject:
General History
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20110531
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16p 4/c insert
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8 x 6 in

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Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Sale Books
History and Social Science » Western Civilization » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Crafts » Dyeing and Surface Design
Science and Mathematics » Botany » Ethnobotany and Useful Plants

Indigo: In Search of the Color That Seduced the World New Hardcover
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Product details 256 pages Bloomsbury Publishing PLC - English 9781608195053 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this memoir of longing, community, and personal maturation, McKinley (The Book of Sarahs), half African-American by birth, adopted and raised by white parents who were plant devotees, seeks her roots through the intertwined European and African history of the once rare indigo. A plant dye long prized for its deep blue color, indigo became a staple of trade from Africa across the Mediterranean and Europe; indigo and the fabric dyed from it evoke stories of slavery (past and present), global trade, and entrenched cultural traditions. McKinley's journey to the source of indigo leads her unexpectedly to politically unstable areas like the Ivory Coast, as well as to Ghana, Mali, and other African countries, where she is welcomed. McKinley's passion for the rare blue dye — created from ash, urine, and leaves, and used to painstakingly imprint storytelling designs — leads to intense friendships and an introduction to the complexity of social and economic status in a continent so far removed from the woman who inspired McKinley's journey — her grandmother — a questioning, tartan-clad woman in a rich blue coat. Photo insert; map. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

Brimming with rich, electrifying tales of the precious dye and its ancient heritage, Indigo is also the story of a personal quest: Catherine McKinley is the descendant of a clan of Scots who wore indigo tartan; Jewish "rag traders"; a Massachusetts textile factory owner; and African slaves—her ancestors were traded along the same Saharan routes as indigo, where a length of blue cotton could purchase human life. McKinleys journey in search of beauty and her own history leads her to the West African women who dye, trade, and wear indigo—women who unwittingly teach her that buried deep in the folds of their cloths is all of destiny and the human story.

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