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1 Burnside Health and Medicine- Politics of Health Care

Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won't Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care

by

Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won't Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Every once in a while a book comes along that rocks the foundations of an established order that's seriously in need of being shaken. The modern American hospital is that establishment and Unaccountable is that book.”—Shannon Brownlee, author of Overtreated

Dr. Marty Makary is co-developer of the life-saving checklist outlined in Atul Gawande's bestselling The Checklist Manifesto. As a busy surgeon who has worked in many of the best hospitals in the nation, he can testify to the amazing power of modern medicine to cure. But he's also been a witness to a medical culture that routinely leaves surgical sponges inside patients, amputates the wrong limbs, and overdoses children because of sloppy handwriting. Over the last ten years, neither error rates nor costs have come down, despite scientific progress and efforts to curb expenses. Why? To patients, the healthcare system is a black box. Doctors and hospitals are unaccountable, and the lack of transparency leaves both bad doctors and systemic flaws unchecked. Patients need to know more of what healthcare workers know, so they can make informed choices. Accountability in healthcare would expose dangerous doctors, reward good performance, and force positive change nationally, using the power of the free market. Unaccountable is a powerful, no-nonsense, non-partisan diagnosis for healing our hospitals and reforming our broken healthcare system.

Review:

"We demand accountability from Wall Street and the White House, yet are shockingly reluctant to demand it from our hospitals, laments Makary, a Johns Hopkins surgeon and professor of health policy, in this urgent call for doctors and hospital administrators to ditch their dangerous culture of secrecy. Lifting the veil on the existing wealth of data from hundreds of hospitals' rates of infections, surgical complications, and other negative patient outcomes, he argues that making those statistics public would force low performers to fix their problems and compete far more effectively rather than waste money on ad campaigns. Moreover, every patient should routinely be able to see a hospital's re-admission rate; its surgical or treatment complication rates; its 'never happen' events, like surgery on the wrong side of a patient; its safety-survey scores from its own workers; its volume of operations and treatments; and its programs to streamline access to patient records. For a noteworthy example, Makary dishes that one patient boasted that his surgeon operated on President Reagan — but had no clue Reagan suffered from complications caused by an improperly placed central-line for IV fluids and medication. This thought-provoking guide from a leader in the field is a must-read for M.D.s, and an eye-opener for the rest of us. Agent:Glen Hartley, Writer's Representatives LLC. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A New York Times Bestseller

Synopsis:

Why is surgery so expensive?

 

Surgeon Paul A. Ruggieri reveals little-known truths about his profession—and the hidden flaws of our healthcare system—in this compelling and troubling account of real patients, real doctors, and how money influences medical decisions behind the scenes. Even many well-informed patients have no idea what may be contributing to the cost of their surgery. With up-to-date research and stories from his practice, Ruggieri shows how business arrangements among hospitals, insurance companies, and surgeons affect who gets treatment—and whether they get the right treatment. Pulling back the curtain from the hospital bed, he explains how to safeguard ones own health (and finances), and how America can make surgery more affordable for all without sacrificing quality care.

 

Synopsis:

“Every once in a while a book comes along that rocks the foundations of an established order that's seriously in need of being shaken. The modern American hospital is that establishment and Unaccountable is that book.”—Shannon Brownlee, author of Overtreated Dr. Marty Makary is co-developer of the life-saving checklist outlined in Atul Gawande's bestselling The Checklist Manifesto. As a busy surgeon who has worked in many of the best hospitals in the nation, he can testify to the amazing power of modern medicine to cure. But he's also been a witness to a medical culture that routinely leaves surgical sponges inside patients, amputates the wrong limbs, and overdoses children because of sloppy handwriting. Over the last ten years, neither error rates nor costs have come down, despite scientific progress and efforts to curb expenses. Why? To patients, the healthcare system is a black box. Doctors and hospitals are unaccountable, and the lack of transparency leaves both bad doctors and systemic flaws unchecked. Patients need to know more of what healthcare workers know, so they can make informed choices. Accountability in healthcare would expose dangerous doctors, reward good performance, and force positive change nationally, using the power of the free market. Unaccountable is a powerful, no-nonsense, non-partisan diagnosis for healing our hospitals and reforming our broken healthcare system.

About the Author

Marty Makary, M.D., M.P.H. is a surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and a professor of Health Policy at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. He is a regular medical commentator for CNN and FOX News, and appears weekly on a wide variety of programs to discuss health topics. He is a leading patient-safety researcher and led the World Health Organization effort to develop ways to measure healthcare quality. He tweets @DrMartyMD. He lives in the Baltimore/DC area.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781608198368
Author:
Makary, Marty
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Author:
Makary, Marty , M.D.
Author:
Marty Makary, MD
Author:
Ruggieri, Paul A.
Author:
Makary, Martin
Author:
Makary, MD, Marty
Subject:
Health Care Issues
Subject:
Health and Medicine-General
Subject:
Clinical medicine
Subject:
General Medical
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
What Hospitals Won't
Publication Date:
20120931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
BandW art t/o (7 images)
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in
Age Level:
from 18

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Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won't Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Bloomsbury Publishing PLC - English 9781608198368 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "We demand accountability from Wall Street and the White House, yet are shockingly reluctant to demand it from our hospitals, laments Makary, a Johns Hopkins surgeon and professor of health policy, in this urgent call for doctors and hospital administrators to ditch their dangerous culture of secrecy. Lifting the veil on the existing wealth of data from hundreds of hospitals' rates of infections, surgical complications, and other negative patient outcomes, he argues that making those statistics public would force low performers to fix their problems and compete far more effectively rather than waste money on ad campaigns. Moreover, every patient should routinely be able to see a hospital's re-admission rate; its surgical or treatment complication rates; its 'never happen' events, like surgery on the wrong side of a patient; its safety-survey scores from its own workers; its volume of operations and treatments; and its programs to streamline access to patient records. For a noteworthy example, Makary dishes that one patient boasted that his surgeon operated on President Reagan — but had no clue Reagan suffered from complications caused by an improperly placed central-line for IV fluids and medication. This thought-provoking guide from a leader in the field is a must-read for M.D.s, and an eye-opener for the rest of us. Agent:Glen Hartley, Writer's Representatives LLC. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
A New York Times Bestseller
"Synopsis" by ,
Why is surgery so expensive?

 

Surgeon Paul A. Ruggieri reveals little-known truths about his profession—and the hidden flaws of our healthcare system—in this compelling and troubling account of real patients, real doctors, and how money influences medical decisions behind the scenes. Even many well-informed patients have no idea what may be contributing to the cost of their surgery. With up-to-date research and stories from his practice, Ruggieri shows how business arrangements among hospitals, insurance companies, and surgeons affect who gets treatment—and whether they get the right treatment. Pulling back the curtain from the hospital bed, he explains how to safeguard ones own health (and finances), and how America can make surgery more affordable for all without sacrificing quality care.

 

"Synopsis" by ,
“Every once in a while a book comes along that rocks the foundations of an established order that's seriously in need of being shaken. The modern American hospital is that establishment and Unaccountable is that book.”—Shannon Brownlee, author of Overtreated Dr. Marty Makary is co-developer of the life-saving checklist outlined in Atul Gawande's bestselling The Checklist Manifesto. As a busy surgeon who has worked in many of the best hospitals in the nation, he can testify to the amazing power of modern medicine to cure. But he's also been a witness to a medical culture that routinely leaves surgical sponges inside patients, amputates the wrong limbs, and overdoses children because of sloppy handwriting. Over the last ten years, neither error rates nor costs have come down, despite scientific progress and efforts to curb expenses. Why? To patients, the healthcare system is a black box. Doctors and hospitals are unaccountable, and the lack of transparency leaves both bad doctors and systemic flaws unchecked. Patients need to know more of what healthcare workers know, so they can make informed choices. Accountability in healthcare would expose dangerous doctors, reward good performance, and force positive change nationally, using the power of the free market. Unaccountable is a powerful, no-nonsense, non-partisan diagnosis for healing our hospitals and reforming our broken healthcare system.
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