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This title in other editions

Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City

by

Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City Cover

ISBN13: 9781770460713
ISBN10: 1770460713
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“[Delisles books are] some of the most effective and fully realized travel writing out there.” —NPR

Acclaimed graphic memoirist Guy Delisle returns with his strongest work yet, a thoughtful and moving travelogue about life in Israel. Delisle and his family spent a year in East Jerusalem as part of his wifes work with the nongovernmental organization Doctors Without Borders. They were there for the short but brutal Gaza War, a three-week-long military strike that resulted in more than a thousand Palestinian deaths. In his interactions with the emergency medical team sent in by Doctors Without Borders, Delisle eloquently plumbs the depths of the conflict.

Some of the most moving moments in Jerusalem are the interactions between Delisle and Palestinian art students as they explain the motivations for their work. Interspersed with these simply told, affecting stories of suffering, Delisle deftly and often drolly recounts the quotidian: crossing checkpoints, going kosher for Passover, and befriending other stay-at-home dads with NGO-employed wives.

Jerusalem evinces Delisles renewed fascination with architecture and landscape as political and apolitical, with studies of highways, villages, and olive groves recurring alongside depictions of the newly erected West Bank Barrier and illegal Israeli settlements. His drawn line is both sensitive and fair, assuming nothing and drawing everything. Jerusalem showcases once more Delisles mastery of the travelogue.

Review:

"Delisle returns to his autobiographical travel format (Burma Chronicles; Pyongyang) with this engaging and troubling look at life in Jerusalem in 2008 and 2009 that won a gold medal for Best Graphic Albumat Angoulême. With his wife, who works for Doctors Without Borders (Medecins sans Frontières, MSF), and their two young children, Delisle sees Jerusalem and the Israeli/Palestinian conflict with the eyes of an outsider. His experiences are recorded in vignettes that touch on such topics as the wall that separates Palestinian and Israeli territories, the problems of airport security, and the very different tours visitors receive depending on the perspective of their guides. Like MSF, Delisle's perspective tends heavily in favor of the Palestinians, particularly those killed in the bombings of Gaza during Operation Cast Lead, which took place during his year there. Delisle is not religious, and his lack of identification with any of the religions of Israel allows him to comment freely on all of them. With a more simplistic style than in Pyongyang, Delisle's use of less shading and starker line work highlights the very complex lives of Israelis, Palestinians, and foreign residents. Dascher's translation is fluid, and the colors by Delisle and Lucie Firoud are effective at setting off distinct scenes." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

“[Jerusalem] is a small miracle: concise, even-handed, highly particular.” —The Guardian

Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City is the acclaimed graphic memoirist Guy Delisles strongest work yet, a thoughtful and moving travelogue about life in contemporary Jerusalem. Delisle expertly lays the groundwork for a cultural road map of the Holy City, utilizing the classic “stranger in a strange land” point of view that made his other books required reading for understanding what daily life is like in cities few are able to travel to. Jerusalem explores the complexities of a city that represents so much to so many. It eloquently examines the impact of conflict on the lives of people on both sides of the wall while drolly recounting the quotidian: checkpoints, traffic jams, and holidays.

     When observing the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim populations that call Jerusalem home, Delisles drawn line is both sensitive and fair, assuming nothing and drawing everything. A sixteen-page appendix to the paperback edition lets the reader behind the curtain, revealing intimate process sketches from Delisles time in Jerusalem.

     Jerusalem is a masterfully hewn travelogue; topping Best of 2012 lists from The Guardian, Paste, and the Montreal Gazette, it was the graphic novel of the year.

Synopsis:

"Neither Jewish nor Arab, Delisle explores Jerusalem and is able to observe this strange world with candidness and humor...But most of all, those stories convey what life in East Jerusalem is about for an expatriate."—Haaretz

"Engaging...[ Delisle] highlights the very complex lives of Israelis, Palestinians, and foreign residents."—Publishers Weekly Starred Review

 

Guy Delisle expertly lays the groundwork for a cultural road map of contemporary Jerusalem, utilizing the classic stranger in a strange land point of view that made his other books, Pyongyang, Shenzhen, and Burma Chronicles required reading for understanding what daily life is like in cities few are able to travel to. In Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City, Delisle explores the complexities of a city that represents so much to so many. He eloquently examines the impact of the conflict on the lives of people on both sides of the wall while drolly recounting the quotidian: checkpoints, traffic jams, and holidays.
 
When observing the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim populations that call Jerusalem home, Delisles drawn line is both sensitive and fair, assuming nothing and drawing everything. Jerusalem showcases once more Delisles mastery of the travelogue.

About the Author

Guy Delisle spent a decade working in animation in Europe and Asia. In 2008-2009, he accompanied his wife, an administrator for Doctors Without Borders, on a yearlong posting in Jerusalem. He lives in the south of France with his wife and children.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lukas, October 29, 2013 (view all comments by lukas)
This French comic artist belongs to a small group (Joe Sacco is the other prominent example) who combine reporting with autobiography. He's traveled to China, North Korea and Burma and then illustrated his experiences. In this book, he and his family spend a year in Jerusalem and he acts as a wry, mostly impartial observer to the continuing tensions. His artwork is a little more cartoonish than Sacco's, but still detailed and striking. Even if you dismiss comics, this is worth your time. Also see: Persepolis, Palestine.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781770460713
Author:
Delisle, Guy
Publisher:
Drawn & Quarterly
Author:
Dascher, Helge
Subject:
Graphic Novels-Literary
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Full-Color Illustrations Throughout
Pages:
344
Dimensions:
8.5 x 6 in

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » General
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Literary
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Nonfiction

Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City New Hardcover
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$24.95 In Stock
Product details 344 pages Drawn & Quarterly - English 9781770460713 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Delisle returns to his autobiographical travel format (Burma Chronicles; Pyongyang) with this engaging and troubling look at life in Jerusalem in 2008 and 2009 that won a gold medal for Best Graphic Albumat Angoulême. With his wife, who works for Doctors Without Borders (Medecins sans Frontières, MSF), and their two young children, Delisle sees Jerusalem and the Israeli/Palestinian conflict with the eyes of an outsider. His experiences are recorded in vignettes that touch on such topics as the wall that separates Palestinian and Israeli territories, the problems of airport security, and the very different tours visitors receive depending on the perspective of their guides. Like MSF, Delisle's perspective tends heavily in favor of the Palestinians, particularly those killed in the bombings of Gaza during Operation Cast Lead, which took place during his year there. Delisle is not religious, and his lack of identification with any of the religions of Israel allows him to comment freely on all of them. With a more simplistic style than in Pyongyang, Delisle's use of less shading and starker line work highlights the very complex lives of Israelis, Palestinians, and foreign residents. Dascher's translation is fluid, and the colors by Delisle and Lucie Firoud are effective at setting off distinct scenes." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
“[Jerusalem] is a small miracle: concise, even-handed, highly particular.” —The Guardian

Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City is the acclaimed graphic memoirist Guy Delisles strongest work yet, a thoughtful and moving travelogue about life in contemporary Jerusalem. Delisle expertly lays the groundwork for a cultural road map of the Holy City, utilizing the classic “stranger in a strange land” point of view that made his other books required reading for understanding what daily life is like in cities few are able to travel to. Jerusalem explores the complexities of a city that represents so much to so many. It eloquently examines the impact of conflict on the lives of people on both sides of the wall while drolly recounting the quotidian: checkpoints, traffic jams, and holidays.

     When observing the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim populations that call Jerusalem home, Delisles drawn line is both sensitive and fair, assuming nothing and drawing everything. A sixteen-page appendix to the paperback edition lets the reader behind the curtain, revealing intimate process sketches from Delisles time in Jerusalem.

     Jerusalem is a masterfully hewn travelogue; topping Best of 2012 lists from The Guardian, Paste, and the Montreal Gazette, it was the graphic novel of the year.

"Synopsis" by ,

"Neither Jewish nor Arab, Delisle explores Jerusalem and is able to observe this strange world with candidness and humor...But most of all, those stories convey what life in East Jerusalem is about for an expatriate."—Haaretz

"Engaging...[ Delisle] highlights the very complex lives of Israelis, Palestinians, and foreign residents."—Publishers Weekly Starred Review

 

Guy Delisle expertly lays the groundwork for a cultural road map of contemporary Jerusalem, utilizing the classic stranger in a strange land point of view that made his other books, Pyongyang, Shenzhen, and Burma Chronicles required reading for understanding what daily life is like in cities few are able to travel to. In Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City, Delisle explores the complexities of a city that represents so much to so many. He eloquently examines the impact of the conflict on the lives of people on both sides of the wall while drolly recounting the quotidian: checkpoints, traffic jams, and holidays.
 
When observing the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim populations that call Jerusalem home, Delisles drawn line is both sensitive and fair, assuming nothing and drawing everything. Jerusalem showcases once more Delisles mastery of the travelogue.
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